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Smoke Flavor using slow n low charcoal setup

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    #16
    Also, thank you for the picture by Attjack and the link to the Popular Mechanics article by jfmorris. Both are very helpful in the exact way to stack briquettes. Thanks.

    Comment


    • glitchy
      glitchy commented
      Editing a comment
      If you already have a SnS, I’d say keep using that. Many people here use the SnS all the time.

    • jfmorris
      jfmorris commented
      Editing a comment
      Those are not applicable if using the SNS. Look at the lighting guides on the snsgrills.com website. We were going by you saying you burned a "line of charcoal"...

    #17
    My suggestion is to not make a lot of changes right off the bat. By making multiple changes at the same time, you'll have a hard time pinning things down as to what works best for you.

    I've never used B&B charcoal so I have no comment about it. But, I've used KBB, with success, for decades. My taste buds might differ from yours, this is a trial and error exercise, that will lead you to know how to produce thins the way you like them. Take your time, change one thing at a time. Good luck.

    Comment


      #18
      Unless you know you love oak smoke, I’d say go buy one of the little $6 bags of pecan or hickory chunks Weber has and try 2-3 chunks of that. I’m not sure the wife and I like oak. The couple times I’ve used it, it has actually seemed very strong or distinct to me and everyone else says it’s mild.

      You’ll probably get 100 responses for a rib method, I’ll share mine too. I follow a virtual friends competition method. 260 degrees whole cook. After two hours wrap in foil with some stuff (butter, juice, molasses, etc.), remove from foil after 1 hour and cook 1-2 more hours until where I want them. This is St. Louis ribs.

      Comment


      • glitchy
        glitchy commented
        Editing a comment
        You should be able to get the chunks at the same Ace or Lowe’s your wife found B&B charcoal. Keep on trying, just go buy a bunch of ribs at Costco or Sam’s and cook all weekend ;-)

      #19
      Most everything has been covered, but I do have one question - what do you mean by bad smoke? Because when I started smoking on the SNS/Weber combo, I would get impatient and drop the food on as I dropped the wood on and the early smoke seemed harsh to me.

      What I've learned to do now is this:

      1) Start 6-12 briquettes in the corner of the SNS. Err on the low side. DO NOT add the other coals yet.
      2) When the initial briquettes are ashed over, add the rest of the coals spread out in the SNS
      3) Plop on two chunks of wood, one on the lit coals, one the coals next to those (that will light next).
      4) put on the grill, the lid and... walk away for 20-30 minutes.

      Step 4 is important. Let the smoke settle in. Don't go longer, but give it a bit to do that. Then add the meat. Insert/postion the temp probes and go have a beer,

      Comment


      • Panhead John
        Panhead John commented
        Editing a comment
        Excellent suggestions.☝️

      #20
      I appreciate the comments about making one change at a time. I will try to change the B&B charcoal first.

      Regarding the oak: I too feel that oak produces a mild smoke. But there are many varieties of oak. The oak I used grows in The Clearwater area in Florida.

      Comment


        #21
        I appreciate what rickgregory said: I too get impatient and drop the food on as I drop the wood on. Maybe that is too soon. I will give the wood a chance to settle in during lighting.

        Comment


          #22
          How are you starting your charcoal? If you're using a petroleum based liquid starter fluid to get that job done be aware that it can show up in the taste of the food. Yuck!

          Comment


            #23
            Originally posted by glitchy View Post
            \

            You’ll probably get 100 responses for a rib method,
            Oh yeah!!

            But, there are so many variables (weather, including wind, etc.) that effect the cook, you have to be ready to make adjustments. I like my 6-7 hour ribs, and I like my 4 hour ribs, they're different but all good.

            I'm able to keep my Performer out of the wind, which really helps to maintain steady temps. I use temp probes on the grill, and in the cook when appropriate. Thermometers built into the lid are fine if you're coking on the lid, but unreliable otherwise. Get a good quality digital thermometer that offers probes for both the meat and the grill temps.

            Comment


              #24
              Update: I tried cooking ribs using KBB (as before) with the SnS and about 250F to 275F. The change was that I used only two chunks of oak at the beginning, not adding wood later. I cooked the ribs for about 3 hours initially, then wrapped in foils for about 1.75 hours, then put sauce on (unwrapped) for about 45 mins indirect heat. WOW!!! What a great flavor. There was no ashy off taste. I concluded that I was using too much wood throughout the cook. I heard this can happen but I did not think it was possible. Also, my sister and brother-in-law loved the ribs too. Thank you all who responded. I will be trying this again soon.

              Comment


              • jfmorris
                jfmorris commented
                Editing a comment
                So good to hear that your second attempt at the ribs was such a success!

              #25
              You guys really helped me by all the great discussions. Thank you!

              Comment


                #26
                W00T! Now you're off to the races!

                It's great when something "clicks" in your head based on some small changes you've made and you get to sample the results and find you really love it. I'm glad the community here could help you... you'll find that others fall in love with your BBQ when it becomes 'second nature' to you and you don't think you're really doing all that much.

                Can't tell you how many times I've been told I should open a BBQ joint, lol. I just laugh and shake my head... not a chance, I'd rather provide the meat to friends and family for free for now.

                One of my friends went through this as he became a much more proficient cook, and he LOVED entertaining and such. Spent greater than 7 figures renovating a restaurant and now 2 years later, after struggling the ENTIRE time, he's closed it. I feel for him.

                Comment


                  #27
                  It’s really different when you do something as a job than a hobby for fun. I feel for your friend, he must have been under a lot of stress.

                  Comment


                  • DogFaced PonySoldier
                    DogFaced PonySoldier commented
                    Editing a comment
                    He went back to his old job, he ain't in the poorhouse.

                  #28
                  Originally posted by tbahder1 View Post
                  Update: I tried cooking ribs using KBB (as before) with the SnS and about 250F to 275F. The change was that I used only two chunks of oak at the beginning, not adding wood later. I cooked the ribs for about 3 hours initially, then wrapped in foils for about 1.75 hours, then put sauce on (unwrapped) for about 45 mins indirect heat. WOW!!! What a great flavor. There was no ashy off taste. I concluded that I was using too much wood throughout the cook. I heard this can happen but I did not think it was possible. Also, my sister and brother-in-law loved the ribs too. Thank you all who responded. I will be trying this again soon.
                  While it's fresh in your mind, think about what you liked... was it less smoke? A different kind of smoke (less harsh etc)? Then file that away. One ting I like about charcoal smoking is the ability to adjust how much wood you use based on what you want. You might find out that you like, say, brisket or chuck with more wood. Or not. But this is a good baseline from which to start.

                  Finally, after you've been smoking, take a shower and change clothes. Sounds odd but when you've been immersed in smoke for hours, the dish itself can taste less smoky to you.

                  Comment


                  • jfmorris
                    jfmorris commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Second this. I usually change shirts and wash my face, to get rid of the smoke I smell on myself constantly after tending the smoker or grill.

                  • frailinryan
                    frailinryan commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Yeah that's the only thing that annoys me when smoking food, my clothes smelling like an ash tray when I'm done.

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