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Weber 310 Spirit and Grill Grates Question.

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    Weber 310 Spirit and Grill Grates Question.

    Anybody have the Spirit E310 II and using Grill Grates? I am underwhelmed by the original setup the way it is. I'm used to way more BTU's and will the Grill Grates add that much to the grill? Really thinking about cutting my losses and going charcoal only and possibly getting a SNS grill or a PK, but would love to save the money if I can.

    #2
    I had a E-330 and put full coverage GrillGrates on it. Performance wise, I really didn't notice much difference between with them vs the stainless steel grates I had for it. What I did notice was a reduction in flare ups. With the E-330 (basically a 310 with side and sear burners), I never felt shorted on BTU's at all, so kinda surprised you do with the E-310. Maybe I turned on the sear burner more than I recall. Though it sure seems I could almost max out the dome thermometer without it on and go well past with.

    When I tried to do more 'grilling' on a Traeger I became a big fan of GrillGrates. Now that I no longer have a Traeger and don't try to sear steaks on my CampChef, I'm becoming far less of a fan. I sold my gasser because I rarely used it, but was thinking about putting the stainless grates back in instead of the GrillGrates. I don't like how much gunk the GrillGrates hold and how spotless you need to keep them not to have junk from previous cooks liquify and splatter onto your food. And I didn't want to buy another $50 worth of GrillGrates special cleaning brushes, etc.

    My personal take is they are super popular for two things, people that want to use the flat side a lot as a griddle and people that want perfect diamond grill marks on their steaks.
    Last edited by glitchy; August 3, 2020, 03:24 PM.

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    • glitchy
      glitchy commented
      Editing a comment
      and so my vote would be put the $100+ for full GrillGrates towards the charcoal grill. It will give you more options all around if you don't have a true smoker of some sort already.

    • RichieB
      RichieB commented
      Editing a comment
      glitchy makes a good point. However, get the GG for the spirt, then a Kettle with SnS and Vortex. MCS alive and well!

    • Parkin
      Parkin commented
      Editing a comment
      THX...I had an old Jenn Aire gas for years that would get 700-800* really easily. It got replaced by the Weber and am just not that impressed. I'm trying to give the Weber a shot but The Bronco in grill position is better at getting a sear than the Weber is.

    #3
    I have a Genesis 3 burner and can safely say it ups the heat. I have 3 panels grate side up and 2 flat side up. I've read pretty high heat on both grates and flat with the IR gun. I don't think you'll be dissapointed.
    EDIT: Didn't make very clear I have the full set of Grill Grates for the Genesis. It ups the game.
    Last edited by RichieB; August 3, 2020, 03:41 PM.

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      #4
      I agree with glitchy I only use my Weber 3 burner Genesis gasser for rotisserie now. 98% of my cooks are on the Recteq pellet smoker or the Weber 22” kettle with SnS and/or Vortex.

      Comment


        #5
        My father has the older Spirit E-330, and my son has a Spirit II E-310 that I got him as a wedding gift. They get pretty hot. My dad has a full set of Grillgrates - my son does not.

        I have Grillgrates on a Genesis II E-410, and find that they do increase searing capability, but more than that, reduce flareups and give more versatility to the grill. For cooking veggies, fish, other things that would stick or fall through the grate, they are the bomb. The flat side is good for searing as well.

        I do a LOT of reverse seared steaks using the Genesis with Grillgrates when I am too lazy or time constrained to fire up charcoal in the kettle.
        Last edited by jfmorris; August 3, 2020, 08:24 PM.

        Comment


          #6
          I have the Spirit II E-310 and was not impressed with the stock grates. I got the full set of GG and like it a lot. I actually have to turn the gas down sometimes to keep them from getting too hot! (Just Kidding). Seriously, it has done much better at searing with the GG than without. Problem is, I caught MCS a while back and picked up a Cuisinart gas griddle, so sometimes I play with it instead of the Spirit for searing. Both work very well.

          Comment


            #7
            Thanks for all the replies. Think I'm going to give the GG set a try. The wife wants something simple she can cook on when I'm not around and isn't very interested in using charcoal herself....I guess worst case is I get it working right and have it around as a backup.

            Comment


            • jfmorris
              jfmorris commented
              Editing a comment
              I think she will find the Spirit with these easy to use. I gave my old 2 burner Genesis outfitted with these to my daughter and son-in-law when they got married in May, so that they would have a nice, easy to use grill. My wife might try my new Camp Chef flat top or the Genesis II, but I can never see her firing up charcoal, ever.

            #8
            So, I got the Grill Grates for my Weber yesterday and did some burgers and dogs for dinner. Good news is the heat was waaaaay more even and higher (at least 200* higher and more even).... the bad news is, I get what glitchy was saying about the gunk buildup and keeping them clean. Overall they saved a grill I was going to get rid of and will probably make it the last gasser I'll buy. Any advice on clean-up from anyone?

            Comment


              #9
              Parkin what I use for cleanup is a combination of things.

              First, don't let a little gunk in the valleys bother you, unless you plan on tossing a bunch of veggies or small stuff in there that would combine with the ash build up. Anyway, what I use is a combination approach:

              1. For day to day cleanup, I just scrape the surface of the rails, or the flat side if using that side, with the "Grill & Griddle Detailing & Scraper Tool" from grillgrate.com - it works well, and the pointy end is good for cleaning out the groove where the panels mate.

              https://www.grillgrate.com/the-grill...l-and-scraper/

              Locally, just get a paint scraper from Home Depot or Lowes - same thing, with a shorter handle:

              https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-15...0846/309098036

              2. If I REALLY want to get serious, I have this brush, that fits over the rail and scrubs 2 valleys at a time:

              https://www.grillgrate.com/the-grate...y-grill-brush/

              Warning though - that brush uses galvanized steel for the coils. I love that there are no bristles, but it would be better if it was stainless steel. My first one rusted up - the second one I wash off and dry and it hasn't rusted yet. I think there are similar brushes on Amazon that have stainless wire for the coils, but they may not have the same handle angle to the "brush" head.

              I don't use the brush unless things are really gunked up from the previous cook.

              3. Finally, I just use the Grate Tool that came with your set you just bought. It is perfect for scraping and shoveling debris out of the valleys. I usually do that after scraping the rails - during the preheat on the next cook. Just shove stuff to the back, then shovel out and toss into the grass for the dogs to sniff and munch on.

              https://www.grillgrate.com/the-gratetool/


              4. Finally, if grilling frequently, about once a month I just take the panels off and hose them off good, and use the 3 above tools and some dish soap to give them a better detailing.

              This all sounds like a pain, but its really just a minute or two of scrape/brush/shovel. I usually do all this during the pre-heat for a cook, versus after a cook. I usually just turn the grill off when the food is done, and wipe the lid and side tables before covering once the grill has cooled.

              Comment


              • Parkin
                Parkin commented
                Editing a comment
                Perfect. Thx, man! I used the spatula to push everything to the back and gave the rails a quick scrape.

              #10
              My hi tech tool is a flathead screwdriver. One that fits nicely the grooves where the panels attach to clean out. Push to the back then the tool that came with the GG's to shovel out. A wire brush and silicone brush to clean rails and flat side. That's it. Call me cheap, because I am.

              Comment


              • Parkin
                Parkin commented
                Editing a comment
                I've got a big old flathead that does the trick. Thx!

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