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>15% moisture wood - Need Advice

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    >15% moisture wood - Need Advice

    I have an order of guava chunks coming from Hawaii and I got this message in the email:

    We regret to inform you that we made a mistake on our last shipment of guava wood smoker chunks. Due to a malfunctioning moisture meter, and some human error, we sent out your order before it was fully dried. The chunks did spend time in hot kiln, just not enough time. As a result, the chunks contain more than 15% moisture. You may see some mold forming on them if they are not used right away and not allowed to breathe.

    The chunks are still 100% usable. You may use them as they are or further season them in a dry space with air flow. I recommend setting them on a piece of cardboard or scrap wood in a green house or on a patio that is warm dry and gets a breeze. Be aware that as they dry they will drip sap which will stain most surfaces.
    I live in the upper Midwest. There is no warm, dry patio and no greenhouse. It's a half acre lot (if that)...

    My wife has a room that she keeps her cactus collection in. It has a ceiling fan to keep the air flowing, it's generally the warmest room in the house, but in the summer, with the AC blowing, even with the vent closed, it's probably about 72-74 in there. Wife lights her cacti with LED lights that don't throw much extra heat.

    So, the plan is to lay out the chunks on a two ply sheet of corrugated cardboard, maybe in the center of the room, right under the fan.

    Do we think this is a good idea or an invitation to mold, and maybe insect infestation of the cacti?
    Last edited by Potkettleblack; August 2, 2021, 01:50 PM.

    #2
    I would think as long as they have air movement and it's not a moist environment you should be good. You can get a moisture meter online. I got one earlier this year because I run a wood stove in the winter and was curious how people knew the percentages. It was less than $30 and works pretty well. Lets me know when the wood I'm going to use is seasoned enough.

    Comment


    • Potkettleblack
      Potkettleblack commented
      Editing a comment
      Good idea.

      It's on it's way.

    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      I agree they're a handy little tool. Like a thermometer for wood moisture, can't believe they're that affordable.

    #3
    I have some cherry wood seasoning, I just put on a wood shelf in my garage.
    Garage doors are up and down a coupla times a day so plenty of air flow.
    My garage faces south so plenty of sun to keep it warmer in there.
    No experience with Guava so don't know if it will season like cherry.

    Comment


    • Potkettleblack
      Potkettleblack commented
      Editing a comment
      We don't really use our garage (reasons... sigh). So it's hot and stuffy in there. Not a ton of airflow unless I crack a window...

    #4
    Throw them in your oven at 250 for a few hours and dry them out. I have done that before, works like a charm.

    Comment


    • Loren
      Loren commented
      Editing a comment
      This. Done it a few times with oak that wasn't quite seasoned. A few long sessions at 170 degrees helps significantly with seasoning and makes your house smell like a lumber yard.

    • mrteddyprincess
      mrteddyprincess commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes, agreed, but, uh, I had a friend, yeah, a friend who used his electric smoker to dry out wood splits for his offset and he found that magical temp at which wood ignites. Caught his electric smoker on fire. Ironically it was the one time that there was actually enough smoke in the electric smoker...

    • Loren
      Loren commented
      Editing a comment
      Haha I did the same thing once with a Traeger - I was very amused by the fact I was smoking my smoking wood until it caught fire 😕🤣

    #5
    I see no worries in wood >15% moisture at all. I also don't think you have the slightest thing to worry about regarding mold. Unless by saying they're >15% moisture that means they're 45% or something. Assuming they mean to to say they're 20% I think you're good.

    Edit: to be transparent though, I am not familiar with guava wood. Maybe it's different.

    Comment


    • Potkettleblack
      Potkettleblack commented
      Editing a comment
      He didn't say. I'm not sure he knows how much more than 15% (and is 15% some tipping point number... I dunno, I'm asking).

    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Potkettleblack I've always heard 20-25% is good. That's been my line in the sand. But again, not familiar with guava if it's different in some way w/ its moisture.

    #6
    I think we need to know if this is a bag or a pallet of wood. For smallish quantities, I'd try what Spinaker suggests, even if you had to do that a few times because of volume.

    The other thing is what Huskee brings up, whether it's 20% or 50%.

    Comment


    • Potkettleblack
      Potkettleblack commented
      Editing a comment
      Box or so... nothing like a pallet. One order of chunks...

    #7
    It must be a hard wood if ur going to smoke with it,,,,
    don’t know how big the chunks are but they should dry out pretty quickly by keeping them undercover and air flowing thru the box
    there is a vid out there somewhere stating that naturally season wood gives you a better end product than kiln dried for the fact that the moisture content is a tad higher,,,in the 20% range

    Comment


    • Potkettleblack
      Potkettleblack commented
      Editing a comment
      Recommended on the free side:
      https://www.hawaiiguava.com/
      Recommended on their site by Greg Rempe of the Pitcast...
      According to the Horticulture department at Perdue:
      Wood: The wood is yellow to reddish, fine-grained, compact, moderately strong, weighs 650-750 kg per cubic meter; is durable indoors; used in carpentry and turnery. Though it may warp on seasoning ... It is good fuelwood. and also a source of charcoal.

    #8
    I remember the time when you were battling condo association. New world, big ‘Ol lot & battling wood chunks. Nice!
    Last edited by FireMan; August 2, 2021, 07:06 PM.

    Comment


    • Potkettleblack
      Potkettleblack commented
      Editing a comment
      I feel like someday I might have a battle worth fighting.

      Funny story, the problem lady at the Condo... her unit was recently listed for sale. I had a long laugh about that.

    #9
    Your plan will work just fine. The main thing is you don't want them to sit around in the box or a plastic bag for awhile. Any place out of the elements and with air flow will be fine.

    Comment

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