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Lodge Cast Iron

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    #46
    Are those Finex skillets bare cast iron? If I'm going to drop that much money then I'd rather get Le Creuset.

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      #47
      I scored a few gems today at the outlet barn. I picked these two lodge muffin pans and the serving dish for $20. The muffin pans are $40 a piece from the factory. And the serving dish is about $20. I got a great deal. Just gotta do a good scrub on these and re-season them. And they will be like brand new!! I am not sure why they got dumped down to the outlet, maybe they just sat on the shelf too long. I cant see anything wrong with them. other than some same surface rust. I am thinking I can use the muffin pans for chicken and for doing my corn bread on the smoker.
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      • Breadhead
        Breadhead commented
        Editing a comment
        Great snag Spinaker ... You can't have to much cast iron.👍

      #48
      Love the Lodge outlet store!!! Went by there years ago and picked up some slightly blemished things. My favorite is a deep dish with a frying pan lid. Griswald (???) is a good brand too. Very old, not around any longer. I have my Granny's corn stick pan which is a Griswald. Always check out cast iron at garage sales!

      Comment


        #49
        Originally posted by CandySueQ View Post
        Love the Lodge outlet store!!! Went by there years ago and picked up some slightly blemished things. My favorite is a deep dish with a frying pan lid. Griswald (???) is a good brand too. Very old, not around any longer. I have my Granny's corn stick pan which is a Griswald. Always check out cast iron at garage sales!
        The outlet is a great place. Such great deals.
        Yeah Griswold went out in the 1960's. Lodge is the only old one still making them in America. Kinda sad.

        Last edited by Spinaker; May 14, 2017, 01:18 PM.

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        • Thunder77
          Thunder77 commented
          Editing a comment
          I have an old Griswold frying pan. Perfect for two eggs at a time, or GREAT for grilled cheese!

        • Spinaker
          Spinaker commented
          Editing a comment
          Hang on to that one, those are collectors now!! But keep using it! Thunder77

        • gcdmd
          gcdmd commented
          Editing a comment
          There's even at least one Griswold fan club that actually holds national conventions. I own several Grizzies that I got online. They're expensive but worth it. The old Wagner line of cast iron cookware was good, too.

          http://gcica.org/
          Last edited by gcdmd; May 24, 2016, 01:56 PM.

        #50
        Check out the Dutch Oven accessories at CampMaid.com. I used the "smoker" setup (inverted dutch oven over the grill) last trip for some chicken with spectacular results.

        Comment


          #51
          http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/t...cast-iron.html

          There is absolutely no reason why you cannot use soap and water on cast iron that is properly seasoned. The key being PROPERLY seasoned. Usually it is not necessary, but it can be done without detriment to the pan. The coating on your seasoned pan is actually polymerized oils, not carbon.

          My cast iron 10" skillet is the ONLY way I make cornbread!

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            #52
            Originally posted by jgjeske1 View Post
            http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/t...cast-iron.html

            There is absolutely no reason why you cannot use soap and water on cast iron that is properly seasoned. The key being PROPERLY seasoned. Usually it is not necessary, but it can be done without detriment to the pan. The coating on your seasoned pan is actually polymerized oils, not carbon.

            My cast iron 10" skillet is the ONLY way I make cornbread!
            I just never need to use the soap. Hot water is the only thing I need on my Cast Iron, it cleans up perfect. If its properly seasoned, you don't need the soap.
            Its also the only way I ever make Cornbread. No question its the best way to do it. Especially when you grease the pan with bacon grease.
            Last edited by Spinaker; May 24, 2016, 01:28 PM.

            Comment


            • Thunder77
              Thunder77 commented
              Editing a comment
              I usually don't need it either. But it's nice to know that you can use it. But so many people say not to use it, I wanted to clear that up.

            • Spinaker
              Spinaker commented
              Editing a comment
              I hear ya. They make it sound like soap is Kryptonite. Thunder77 I think we need to emphasize that you don't NEED soap as opposed to "it will ruin your cookware"

            • Thunder77
              Thunder77 commented
              Editing a comment
              I agree Spinaker! Now I just have to decide which one of my kids gets the 10" skillet. 🤔

            #53
            Funny how old topics get bumped, I just picked up a 5-qt Lodge Dutch oven from Kroger last Sunday and made barbecue beans in it. It was on sale for $39.95.

            By the way, if it has a flat lid with a rim and feet Lodge calls it a Camp Dutch Oven. Their Dutch Oven has no feet and a rounded lid.

            Comment


              #54
              Originally posted by billg71 View Post
              Funny how old topics get bumped, I just picked up a 5-qt Lodge Dutch oven from Kroger last Sunday and made barbecue beans in it. It was on sale for $39.95.

              By the way, if it has a flat lid with a rim and feet Lodge calls it a Camp Dutch Oven. Their Dutch Oven has no feet and a rounded lid.
              Yeah, its always nice to get one bumped up. Plus, this is a great thread. Lots of good Cast Iron info on here. smarkley is into it as much as I am, and he's added a lot to this thread.

              Comment


                #55
                OK, thanks to @jgjeske1 I have Kenji's actual post from seriouseats.com, which is more informative than the one I posted earlier from the NBC web site.

                The Truth About Cast Iron Pans: 7 Myths That Need To Go Away

                The Food Lab
                J. Kenji López-Alt

                Myth #1: "Cast iron is difficult to maintain."

                The Theory: Cast iron is a material that can rust, chip, or crack easily. Buying a cast iron skillet is like adopting a newborn baby and a puppy at the same time. You're going to have to pamper it through the early stages of its life, and be gentle when you store it—that seasoning can chip off!

                The Reality: Cast iron is tough as nails! There's a reason why there are 75-year-old cast iron pans kicking around at yard sales and antique shops. The stuff is built to last and it's very difficult to completely ruin it. Most new pans even come pre-seasoned, which means that the hard part is already done for you and you're ready to start cooking right away.

                And as for storing it? If your seasoning is built up in a nice thin, even layer like it should be, then don't worry. It ain't gonna chip off. I store my cast iron pans nested directly in each other. Guess how many times I've chipped their seasoning? Try doing that to your non-stick skillet without damaging the surface.

                Myth #2: "Cast iron heats really evenly."

                The Theory: Searing steaks and frying potatoes requires high, even heat. Cast iron is great at searing steaks, so it must be great at heating evenly, right?

                The Reality: Actually, cast iron is terrible at heating evenly. The thermal conductivity—the measure of a material's ability to transfer heat from one part to another—is around a third to a quarter that of a material like aluminum. What does this mean? Throw a cast iron skillet on a burner and you end up forming very clear hot spots right on top of where the flames are, while the rest of the pan remains relatively cool.

                The main advantage of cast iron is that it has very high volumetric heat capacity, which means that once it's hot, it stays hot. This is vitally important when searing meat. To really heat cast iron evenly, place it over a burner and let it preheat for at least 10 minutes or so, rotating it every once in a while. Alternatively, heat it up in a hot oven for 20 to 30 minutes (but remember to use a potholder or dish towel!)

                For more on this stuff, check out this great article by Dave Arnold at Cooking Issues.

                The other advantage is its high emissivity—that is, its tendency to expel a lot of heat energy from its surface in the form of radiation. Stainless steel has an emissivity of around .07. Even when it's extremely hot, you can put your hand close to it and not feel a thing. Only the food directly in contact with it is heating up in any way. Cast iron, on the other hand, has a whopping .64 emissivity rating, which means that when you're cooking in it, you're not just cooking the surface in contact with the metal, but you're cooking a good deal of food above it as well. This makes it ideal for things like making hash or pan roasting chicken and vegetables.

                Myth #3: "My well-seasoned cast iron pan is as non-stick as any non-stick pan out there."

                The Theory: The better you season your cast iron, the more non-stick it becomes. Perfectly well-seasoned cast iron should be perfectly non-stick.

                The Reality: Your cast iron pan (and mine) may be really really really non-stick—non-stick enough that you can make an omelet in it or fry an egg with no problem—but let's get serious here. It's not anywhere near as non-stick as, say, Teflon, a material so non-stick that we had to develop new technologies just to get it to bond to the bottom of a pan. Can you dump a load of cold eggs into your cast iron pan, slowly heat it up with no oil, then slide those cooked eggs right back out without a spot left behind? Because you can do that in Teflon.

                Yeah, didn't think so.

                That said, macho posturing aside, so long as your cast iron pan is well seasoned and you make sure to pre-heat it well before adding any food, you should have no problems whatsoever with sticking.

                Myth #4: "You should NEVER wash your cast iron pan with soap."

                The Theory: Seasoning is a thin layer of oil that coats the inside of your skillet. Soap is designed to remove oil, therefore soap will damage your seasoning.

                The Reality: Seasoning is actually not a thin layer of oil, it's a thin layer of polymerized oil, a key distinction. In a properly seasoned cast iron pan, one that has been rubbed with oil and heated repeatedly, the oil has already broken down into a plastic-like substance that has bonded to the surface of the metal. This is what gives well-seasoned cast iron its non-stick properties, and as the material is no longer actually an oil, the surfactants in dish soap should not affect it. Go ahead and soap it up and scrub it out.

                The one thing you shouldn't do? Let it soak in the sink. Try to minimize the time it takes from when you start cleaning to when you dry and re-season your pan. If that means letting it sit on the stovetop until dinner is done, so be it.

                Myth #5: "Don't use metal utensils on your cast iron pan!"

                The Theory: The seasoning in cast iron pans is delicate and can easily flake out or chip if you use metal. Stick to wood or nylon utensils.

                The Reality: The seasoning in cast iron is actually remarkably resilient. It's not just stuck to the surface like tape, it's actually chemically bonded to the metal. Scrape away with a metal spatula and unless you're actually gouging out the surface of the metal, you should be able to continue cooking in it with no issue.

                So you occasionally see flakes of black stuff chip out of the pan as you cook in it? It's possible that's seasoning, but unlikely. In order to get my cast iron pan's seasoning to flake off, I had to store it in the oven for a month's-worth of heating and drying cycles without re-seasoning it before I started to see some scaling.

                More likely, those flakes of black stuff are probably carbonized bits of food that were stuck to the surface of the pan because you refused to scrub them out with soap last time you cooked.

                Myth #6: "Modern cast iron is just as good as old cast iron. It's all the same material, after all."

                The Theory: Metal is metal, cast iron is cast iron, the new stuff is no different than the old Wagner and Griswold pans from early 20th century that people fetishize.

                The Reality: The material may be the same, but the production methods have changed. In the old days, cast iron pans were produced by casting in sand-based molds, then polishing the resulting pebbly surfaces until smooth. Vintage cast iron tends to have a satiny smooth finish. By the 1950s, as production scaled up and was streamlined, this final polishing step was dropped from the process. The result? Modern cast iron retains that bumpy, pebbly surface.

                The difference is more minor than you may think. So long as you've seasoned your pan properly, both vintage and modern cast iron should take on a nice non-stick surface, but your modern cast iron will never be quite as non-stick as the vintage stuff.

                Myth #7: "Never cook acidic foods in cast iron."

                The Theory: Acidic food can react with the metal, causing it to leech into your food, giving you an off-flavor and potentially killing you slowly.

                The Reality: In a well-seasoned cast iron pan, the food in the pan should only be coming in contact with the layer of polymerized oil in the pan, not the metal itself. So in a perfect world, this should not be a problem. But none of us are perfect and neither are our pans. No matter how well you season, there's still a good chance that there are spots of bare metal and these can indeed interact with acidic ingredients in your food.

                For this reason, it's a good idea to avoid long-simmered acidic things, particularly tomato sauce. On the other hand, a little acid is not going to hurt it. I deglaze my pan with wine after pan-roasting chicken all the time. A short simmer won't harm your food, your pan, or your health in any way.

                What you SHOULD do:
                These are the only rules you need to know to have a successful lifelong relationship with your cast iron.

                Season it when you get it. Even pre-seasoned cast iron can do with some extra protection. To season your pan, heat it up on the stovetop until its smoking hot, then rub a little oil into it and let it cool. Repeat this process a few times and you're good to go.

                Clean it after each use. Clean your pan thoroughly after each use by washing it with soap and water and scrubbing out any gunk or debris from the bottom. I use the scrubby side of a sponge for this.

                Re-season it. Rinse out any excess soap with water, then place the skillet over a burner set to high heat. When most of the water inside the skillet has dried out, add a half teaspoon of a neutral oil like vegetable, canola, flaxseed, or shortening. Rub it around with a paper towel. Continue heating the pan until it just starts to smoke then give it one more good rub. Let it cool and you're done.

                Fry and Sear in it. The best way to keep your seasoning maintained? Just use your pan a lot! The more you fry, sear, or bake in it, the better that seasoning will become.

                Don't let it stay wet. Water is the natural enemy of iron and letting even a drop of water sit in your pan when you put it away can lead to a rust spot. Not the end of the world, but rust will require a little scrubbing and reseasoning. I always dry out my pan with a paper towel and coat it with a tiny amount of oil before storage.

                There now, was that so hard? Now get out there and start cooking!

                Last edited by gcdmd; May 26, 2016, 01:24 PM.

                Comment


                • gcdmd
                  gcdmd commented
                  Editing a comment
                  My apologies, Thunder77. I just happened to stumble across it independently while looking for something unrelated by Kenji.

                • Thunder77
                  Thunder77 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  gcdmd, no apology necessary!!

                • gcdmd
                  gcdmd commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thank you, Thunder77

                #56
                Thrift Store Bargain! Griswald 13 1/2" Reverable Magnatite Griddle with Bail Handle! Manufactured from late 30's thru early 50's! In Excellant Cond.!
                For $8.50, I think it will be Great on the Grill and the Stove!
                Eat Well and Prosper, From Fargo ND, Dan

                Comment


                • Spinaker
                  Spinaker commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Awesome score man!!! That's a great addition to any collection. I have yet to add any Griswald to my collection.

                • Danjohnston949
                  Danjohnston949 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thanks Gents! I think I've got the first two Bidders No's at Eunice's Auction Sale? 👍😉😇😉👍
                  From Fargo ND, Dan
                  Last edited by Danjohnston949; May 27, 2016, 06:06 AM.

                • Medusa
                  Medusa commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Nice find! Don't you love finding "treasures"?

                #57
                my wife and I threw a crawfish boil for 50 people a month ago and I got my first use out of my lodge cooking table in my 12" camp dutch oven for frying hushpuppies! wish I had one that was a bit deeper. but I really like this cooking table. will be really good for outdoor baking and braising over the summer.

                Comment


                • Danjohnston949
                  Danjohnston949 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  TimPowell, There is Nothing Like a Southern Ditch Bug Boil! Years ago I had the Opportunity to go to one hosted by bunch of Green Eyed Coon Asses in Lake Charles LA! It was Great! Where did you find your Lodge
                  Table? Do you have a HushPuppie Recipie that you would share? From Fargo ND, Dan

                • Spinaker
                  Spinaker commented
                  Editing a comment
                  There you go!! 😆😆👆👆👆👆😆😆😆😆

                #58
                Danjohnston949 i found the lodge table on amazon. the hushpuppy recipe is essentially the same as my wife's quick cornbread recipe with onion and bell pepper added:

                1 can creamed corn
                2 cornbread mixes (small Jiffy boxes)
                Tony Chachere's seasoning to taste
                1 diced green bell pepper
                1 diced medium onion

                I'm sure you could substitute jalapeño for the bell pepper and they would be even better

                Comment


                • Danjohnston949
                  Danjohnston949 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  TimPowell, Tim Thanks a Million tell you wife that her Recipie now resides in ND! Thank her for Me!
                  From Fargo ND, Dan

                #59
                I Made a huge pick up today. I found some vintage cast iron at an estate sale by my uncles place. I scored one 5 inch Griswold skillet from the 1930's or 40's! One #8 Martin Stove and Range Co deep skillet from the fifties with the lid skillet!! The second Martin Stove and Range Co was a Corn bread pan that looks like it's from the 50's as well. Then an old Lodge 8 inch skillet from the 60's. I also picked up a Lodge 7 cob corn bread pan that appears to be from the 30's. (according to the site I was on) I was able to find a cast iron ID website that helped me narrow down the years they were all produced. It took some digging but I think I have a pretty good grip on when and where they were produced. If anyone has any other ideas or information on these please let me know. Maybe all these years are wrong but the site seemed pretty reputable. I am just getting into collecting vintage cast iron so any information would be awesome!!
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                Next up will be the electrolysis bath for all of these to get rid of most of the rust. I figure a good 24 hour soak at 12 amps I will really help shine these up and cut through the years of rust.
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                  #60
                  I did a vinager bath on these and it did little to remove that tough rust that has accumulated over the years. Time for the Old Sparky Spa Treatment to get juiced up!! 🍳🙈⚡️🛀⚡️🙈🍳

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