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Smoke profile on the SnSK -- Kamado versus SnS setting

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    Smoke profile on the SnSK -- Kamado versus SnS setting

    Have a bit of the MCS (general comments/questions about what to possibly get will be in a different thread), and the SnSK has me intrigued. From a few different reviews, I hear great things about the smoke profile when in SnS mode, but never anything about when in traditional mode. Has anyone with the SnSK done a low and slow comparison? If so, what are the differences, if any, in the smoke profile? Any other noticeable differences? Thanks in advance!

    #2
    I will be curious to hear what others say. Personally, I just don't see why a kamado would need an SNS in the first place. Perhaps the water reservoir could change the flavor profile a bit, by adding more moisture to the cooking chamber; and we know smoke is attached to cold, wet surfaces.

    I get the concept of an SNS in a Kettle, to a point. It does keep all the charcoal in order and contained in the SNS and it makes for a good searing surface. I suppose you can add water to the reservoir if you want. I never add water in my kettles or my kamaods, there really is no need is a cooker that has so little airflow. (I just do the snake method now when using my kettle, even though I have an SNS.)

    Comment


      #3
      Spinaker if you go by the SnSGrills "Turbo-Slow" arguments, having the SNS in a Kamado gives you a hotter, cleaner fire, and more smoke, which means more bark, compared to traditional Kamado mode.

      Having had BBQ from a traditional Kamado, versus my kettle with the SNS or an offset, there are certainly different smoke profiles, with the Kamado being the least smokey in my personal experience. That goes from food I've tasted from a buddy's BGE, and another friend who has a ginormous Kamodo-Kamado. It was all good - just not the meteorite bark I had from my Weber+SNS or offset - it was more reddish-mohagany. I've yet to ever try food made on a pellet cooker. I know a few guys with them, but haven't been to their house for BBQ.

      The SNS mode in the SNSK is losing a lot of the efficiency of a Kamado, in order to have more smoke, and much easier access to the coals for refueling or adding wood.

      I'll be testing both modes on the new SNSK that arrived yesterday, once I figure out fire management and vent settings. On my second test run with just charcoal right now, and dropped the plate setter and upper and lower grates in, just to figure things out. It certainly takes longer to come to temp than my kettle.

      Anyway, Smoking77 - I'll have some comparisons soon. I plan to try butts or ribs made both ways, and make tasting notes and take lots of pictures.
      Last edited by jfmorris; January 19, 2021, 03:42 PM.

      Comment


      • Spinaker
        Spinaker commented
        Editing a comment
        I hear ya, I am just putting my thoughts out there. It is not an attack on you, all I am saying is don't believe everything you hear from a marketing standpoint. After years of owning several Kamados, I just don't see the need for an insert. That being said, do what works for you, if you like it, then that is all that matters.

      • Smoking77
        Smoking77 commented
        Editing a comment
        Spinaker Thanks for giving me stuff to think about. I'm guessing you are fully on board with the kamado experience, right? I've never tried food from one.

      • Spinaker
        Spinaker commented
        Editing a comment
        Oh yeah, I love my kamados. you can get great flavor, awesome bark and some great grilling options too. Smoking77

      #4
      I use the SNS mode for chicken, steaks, burgers, chops, etc. I run Kamado mode for shoulders, briskets, chucks, etc. I have smoked a shoulder in SNS mode and can tell you that I do not see any real difference in the profile. For me that is not the benefit of this cooker. The benefit is that I can easily cook in two zones or as a straight Kamado, whichever I choose. The food coming off this cooker is fantastic but what lead me to purchase was the versatility.
      Last edited by DavidNorcross; January 19, 2021, 05:46 PM.

      Comment


      • Smoking77
        Smoking77 commented
        Editing a comment
        DavidNorcross Thanks for the info! Great to know.

      • jfmorris
        jfmorris commented
        Editing a comment
        That's useful info to know. Ie. that you use the SNS for the hot and fast 2 zone setup, not for low and slow BBQ.

        I am planning to run kamado mode for my first few low and slow cooks anyway, as its different than my kettle and SNS - been there, done that a lot of times!
        Last edited by jfmorris; January 19, 2021, 10:06 PM.

      #5
      Originally posted by jfmorris View Post
      Spinaker if you go by the SnSGrills "Turbo-Slow" arguments, having the SNS in a Kamado gives you a hotter, cleaner fire, and more smoke, which means more bark, compared to traditional Kamado mode.

      Having had BBQ from a traditional Kamado, versus my kettle with the SNS or an offset, there are certainly different smoke profiles, with the Kamado being the least smokey in my personal experience. That goes from food I've tasted from a buddy's BGE, and another friend who has a ginormous Kamodo-Kamado. It was all good - just not the meteorite bark I had from my Weber+SNS or offset - it was more reddish-mohagany. I've yet to ever try food made on a pellet cooker. I know a few guys with them, but haven't been to their house for BBQ.

      The SNS mode in the SNSK is losing a lot of the efficiency of a Kamado, in order to have more smoke, and much easier access to the coals for refueling or adding wood.

      I'll be testing both modes on the new SNSK that arrived yesterday, once I figure out fire management and vent settings. On my second test run with just charcoal right now, and dropped the plate setter and upper and lower grates in, just to figure things out. It certainly takes longer to come to temp than my kettle.

      Anyway, Smoking77 - I'll have some comparisons soon. I plan to try butts or ribs made both ways, and make tasting notes and take lots of pictures.
      jfmorris Thanks for all the info. Looking forward to reading comparisons and seeing pics!

      Comment


        #6
        I didn’t want a kettle and a barrel and kamado on my deck. I chose the kamado because it can do everything you can do on a kettle with an SnS and it handles cold weather better. Oh yeah and pizza. If I need the whole grate and/or am smoking at 275+ I go traditional kamado. Brisket comes to mind.

        If I’m smoking at lower temps (like for fish) or cold smoking (I never cold smoke and you shouldn’t either ) I go with the SnS because it is easier to get clean smoke at low temps because of turboslow. The cooker is super efficient as kamados are but you can reduce your efficiency by employing SnS as it suits your needs. I personally find that a acrid flavor is notable when I try to go kamado mode at less than 275.

        If I need 2 zone to sear then the SnS mode gets the nod obviously.

        I love it and I wouldn’t have a kamado without an SnS because I would need a third cooker on my deck to fill in gaps between the barrel and kamado. Lots of kamado people say I don’t know why you would need an SnS in a kamado and the answer is you absolutely don’t but it increases the versatility so I’m a big fan.

        Attached Files
        Last edited by jhapka; January 19, 2021, 08:17 PM.

        Comment


        • Smoking77
          Smoking77 commented
          Editing a comment
          jfmorris Thank you. Good information to have.

        • Irishfuente
          Irishfuente commented
          Editing a comment
          is it a hassel to go between sns and the kamado?

        • jhapka
          jhapka commented
          Editing a comment
          Irishfuente it is a little bit. The kick ash bucket and basket helped a lot because when there’s charcoal in the cooker and you want to switch configurations you can just shake the SnS or basket over the garbage can and then transfer the charcoal. A whisk broom and the kick ash can make ash removal really quick and easy.

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