Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

holding 325 in big green egg

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    holding 325 in big green egg

    hey meatheads, i have a question i am hoping someone can answer. I have a Big Green Egg. it can hold 225 degrees forever so i have mainly used it for smoking perfect ribs and butts with the occasional salmon. i have never tried chicken and want to do one tomorrow but the recipes i see call for 325 degrees. i cant seem to keep an egg at 325, it either wants to go hotter or cooler. any tips?

    #2
    Welcome! I have a KJ so might not be an exact answer, but same concept. I wouldn’t get too caught up in keeping it dialed in at 325 exactly, rather keeping it between 300-350. Also keep in mind that these ceramic coolers have a ton of thermal mass, so changing temperature is like trying to change directions while driving a semi truck. Make small adjustments and wait and monitor for 15 minutes before making further adjustment. I typically use my bottom vent for large adjustments and then the top vent to fine tune it.

    Comment


      #3
      I cook on a BGE. If you live where winds gust on and off it can be a challenge. My solution was to build a wind block to stabilize the draft of air. The other solution is to use a controller. As USMCCrashCrew89 said you can handle 25 degree swings, since that is exactly what your kitchen oven does. Also, if you are fiddling with the settings constantly it will be difficult to stabilize. You might try marking every 1/4” on the bottom vent to help be more exact on your settings. Also, adjustments on the bottom vent will cause the larger swings and adjustments on the top vent will cause narrower swings. For consistency always fill your charcoal the same way and to the same level.

      Comment


        #4
        I have the Broil King Keg and as the boyz above stated don't look toget to precise, in the ball park will do.
        Our Keg seems to like 280-320 depending on wind and temp so I adjust cook time to suit.
        I can do 250 once and a while but its tough to control
        Then just as you think you have it figured out....420....
        Learning the dampers is a life long occupation

        Comment


          #5
          It took me years to figure out that you can’t rush a kamado.

          Since you know how to get and hold 225, get it to hold 225. Then tick both the top and bottom vents open a little more, just a tap. Wait until it restabilizes, maybe 10 minutes. See how much that changed it. Then nudge it a little more, let it stabilize again. Nudge both vents a little more. Repeat, until it hits 325.

          BGEs are sensitive to small changes, as you have no doubt noticed. Once you got that 325 dialed in, remember it. Then you can build your fire, set your 325, let it stabilize, and make small adjustments. What gets 325 today might be 300 tomorrow, depending on air temp, fire construction, wind, etc. The first shot gets close, then fine tune.

          Oh: I do my birds at 375. 325 bakes them, 375 grills them. It’s just a preference.

          250: ribs & pork butts
          275: briskets and sometimes pork butts
          350-375: birds.
          400: burgers and dogs*
          600+: steaks*

          * I really use the Weber Kettle for these. But when I do them on the BGE, that’s the temp I go for.

          Comment


            #6
            I have a large BGE and have learned to dial in different temps. I use a combination of top vent and bottom vent settings that once you learn them is very consistent. I do have the newer reggulator top vs. the daisy wheel on the large, but use the daisy wheel on my older medium. My process to start the fire is consistent every time. The following is what I do to hit 325 indirect:
            • Fill up firebox with lump and wood chunks - if using (I use a Kick Ash Basket with the bottom egg grate removed)
            • Light 1 Weber fire cube in middle of fire (pushed down lightly)
            • Leave top open and bottom grate fully open for 10 min.
            • After 10 min, put in placesetter and grate (I use PS Woo from CGS)
            • With top and bottom vent fully open, I let temp get to 275-300 (depending on conditions)
            • Then I dial top and bottom vents to 1/2, when it hits 325, dial down to 1/4 to 1/8
            • I wait until clean smoke before putting on food (about 45 min - 1hr since lighting)
            • I'll tweak bottom and top accordingly if necessary to stay at 325, but it's often good to go
            Kamados are not real easy and each one may have a mind of its own . However, once you learn the many different cooking techniques and temp settings, they are so much fun to use for a variety of cooks. I use a lot of grills and smokers, but the ones cooked on the egg are always a hit!

            Comment


              #7
              - All the above posters have given you solid advice. Take your time and creep up on the fire/temp just like you do when your shooting for typical cooking temp that you use (225°F) for ribs/butts etc. Use small incemental changes to to your desired cooking temp for your chicken cook of 325°F.
              - Mosca is spot on BGE's and all ceramics have a mind of their own. What works today might be a smidgen different tomorrow. Guarantee during a cook sometime during your "eggsperience" most likely during an overnighter a weather front will pass through your area and really futz with your settings. Additionally his cooking temp explanation is pretty darn good as a thumb rule.
              - Lastly good luck in your cook. Go lightly on any added wood for smoke. Barnyard strutters are like a smoke sponge.

              Comment


                #8
                I do chicken at 375-400, but definitely try to keep it at or below 400. My point is, you can surely aim for 325, but don’t fret about it going higher.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by tiewunon View Post
                  - All the above posters have given you solid advice. Take your time and creep up on the fire/temp just like you do when your shooting for typical cooking temp that you use (225°F) for ribs/butts etc. Use small incemental changes to to your desired cooking temp for your chicken cook of 325°F.
                  - Mosca is spot on BGE's and all ceramics have a mind of their own. What works today might be a smidgen different tomorrow. Guarantee during a cook sometime during your "eggsperience" most likely during an overnighter a weather front will pass through your area and really futz with your settings. Additionally his cooking temp explanation is pretty darn good as a thumb rule.
                  - Lastly good luck in your cook. Go lightly on any added wood for smoke. Barnyard strutters are like a smoke sponge.
                  Last year I got a new lid, courtesy of BGE. My old lid didn’t have a gasket for the daisy wheel, and 250* was just the tiniest crack of the vent. The new lid has a gasket at the top, and now 250* is a crack of about 1/2”.

                  Click image for larger version  Name:	BA0E27AA-0B72-4FAF-8443-B212B578AE0E.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	2.41 MB ID:	866656
                  Last edited by Mosca; June 21, 2020, 10:42 AM.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Mosca Wow thats a switch. None of my 4 Bge’s or Primo require the slider portion of the daisy wheel to be open. Usually just a small opening on the petals.
                    My SBGE and LBGE Nr1 still have the ceramic firebox grate and they both require a larger petal opening but not much. My MBGE and LBGE Nr 2 Have the metal firebox grate and petal opening is smaller.
                    I have no felt around any of the stacks. Just never felt the need. Only time I see an inordinate amount of smoke coming out around the daisy wheel is when using a controller bringing the cooker up to temp.
                    Often wondered what effect the KAB may have. Too cheap to buy one and don’t mind the clean out the traditional way. Might not know what I am missing.

                    Comment


                    • Mosca
                      Mosca commented
                      Editing a comment
                      tiewunon, You know, from the day I got it I’ve never used the petal openings. I’ve always used just the slider. It’s the way I figured it out.

                      The only accessory I use is the WOO ring, to move the platesetter in and out. I’ve thought about others, but a critical analysis of whether or not I need or would use any of them has landed firmly on “no”.

                    • tiewunon
                      tiewunon commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Mosca Your method is completely sound. Back in the late 70's cooking on my Kikuya Hibatchi Pot (clay Kamado) never used a daisy wheel at all. Just used the rain cap cantered on the stack to maintain temp. Was really flying by the seat of my britches in those days.

                    #11
                    thanks all, great advice. starting the fire in about an hour!

                    Comment

                    Announcement

                    Collapse
                    No announcement yet.
                    Working...
                    X
                    false
                    0
                    Guest
                    500
                    ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
                    false
                    false
                    {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
                    Yes
                    Rubs Promo
                    Meat-Up in Memphis