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Advice for brisket flats

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    Advice for brisket flats

    I am having a get together tomorrow... I got a USDA choice brisket flat that I got a $1.99/lb at a supermarket no less. It weighs in at 6 lb 10 oz. I have my great grate ready for action as I'm also planning on two to four racks of st Louis ribs. Ribs I can deal with, and I've done a flat once before which came out pretty good but that was a ton of time ago and I didn't take notes. As this is only the second time I've done it, I'm a more than just a bit apprehensive... I'd really appreciate any and all thoughts on dealing with flats! Guesstimates on time and so forth... I've dry brined and will likely use bbbr. Please let me know your thoughts....

    #2
    I started typing a reply then had to backspace the whole thing because I realized you're talking about the PBC. Drat. Me no have PBC. But, I would say take it to probe tender, which could happen anywhere from 190 to 205, then let it hold in a faux cambro wrapped for an hour or two, not letting the temp drop below 145. My apologies if you already knew this much, you're probably looking for time guesstimations.

    Comment


      #3
      No apology necessary, Huskee... I wish I kept a log when I cooked one before. I had read Catherine's stickey on cook times and was puzzled to see such a huge variation in cooking times for 5 - 7 lb flats.... Depending on details, I'm hoping no more than 8 hours total. As far as resting goes, if the temp drops, would you rather put it back in the cooker or just use the often?
      Last edited by JPP; May 23, 2015, 05:21 AM.

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        #4
        If the internal gets below 150, and you still have over 1/2 hour until you need it, pop it a 170 degree oven until serving time.

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks guys! As this is going to be a mixed meat cook ( doing some St. Louis too) im thinking that they would go into the cooker a few hours after starting the brisket. It usually takes from 3 - 4 hours depending on how many racks I put in with a fresh load of charcoal. The cooker will be going for at least a few hours by the time I add the ribs. Ideally I'd like them done about the same time... If I assume around 7 hours with wrap and an hour rest for the brisket, I'd expect to put the ribs in around three hours after the brisket was started since the output from the coals should be a bit less... Does this make sense? I'm risking over thinking this a bit!

          PS... Since this is a flat, would a water pan be of some use here?
          Last edited by JPP; May 23, 2015, 05:29 AM.

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            #6
            Nah on the water pan....timing sounds good. Youll know more when you get done. Hahaha

            Comment


              #7
              Any thought on how one should hook a flat? I could double hook thru the middle (flat perpendicular to the rebar) or run them one from each edge so the meat runs parallel to the rebar.

              Comment


                #8
                I usually double-hook perpendicular to the rebar through the thicker end. I've also done them on the flat grill. Not sure which one I liked better.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks ! Decided to use the double hook... Although there is something aesthetically pleasing if a flat is aligned with the rebar!
                  Last edited by JPP; May 23, 2015, 10:26 AM.

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                    #10
                    I've been a bit occupied but I do have a few shots from Saturday... This brisket, in spite of being heavier than the last one, was a lot thinner... Got a great ring, but I dried it out a bit. However, what I cut was consumed. My guest seem to like it more than I did at least.
                    Last edited by JPP; May 25, 2015, 07:59 AM. Reason: fixed typo

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                      #11
                      Flats are inherently dry, but slice real nice. Take a sirloin to extra-well-done, same thing.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The guests seem to love it, at least and I was quite amazed at the ring I got on it. The prior flat I dit was much thicker, and I probably shouldve left alot more of the fat cap on... I got a great temperature profile, and the thing was humming at 297 F so i plugged one of the holed to bring it down to 270 or so. I ended up getting a stall (or seemed to) at 147 F. It actually hit 151 F when I added the four racks of ribs ~ 12 lb total, and the pbc temp tanked to 210. I cracked the lid twice, never bringing the barrel above 270 because the last rib cook where I brought it over 300 leathered the ends of the ribs. Not this time... The consequence was the struggle to keep it hot enough to finish the cook and not get the boss ripped at me 😉. When I finally decided to wrap the brisket though, I had the lid off for some time (and this was five hours since I started) while I wrapped and put in the great grate so I could finish the ribs. The barrel then stabilized at 300 F. I was amazed the coals could do that after burning for that long. That suggests to me that if you add a ton of cold meat that won't take as long to cook to something like a brisket or big shoulder, then leaving the lid off for a bit would be in your best interest.

                        The ribs, as usual were super. Once again the Memphis dust did the trick. My wife's friend (who grew up in the south) raved about them.
                        Last edited by JPP; May 25, 2015, 08:21 AM.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          So them question, regarding dryness of flats, is: would a flat be less dry if you don't let it sit too long in a stall? Of course, shortening the cooking time would compromise barkring...

                          Comment


                          • Jerod Broussard
                            Jerod Broussard commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Wrapping earlier will give you more au jus to put on the dry meat.

                          • JPP
                            JPP commented
                            Editing a comment
                            There was lots of that... For some reason, nobody wanted any

                          #14
                          I did a 5.7 lb flat yesterday... temp in the PBC was running about 265 (although I am starting to wonder about my thermometer). The meat was around 170 internal in about 3 hours (!) but my temps were falling, which seems weird. So I pulled it, wrapped with some beef broth, and stuck it into the oven at 275. 2 hours later, it was 203-205, so it went into the cooler for about an hour and a half. It came out amazing! Maybe could have been a hair more tender, but still super moist and flavorful. And great bark. I am having some strange experiences with what should be longer cooks on this PBC, but everything is coming out incredible.

                          Comment


                          • mayapoppa
                            mayapoppa commented
                            Editing a comment
                            @CulrlingDog- the only incorrect thing you stated was the price... that was from the original post. I got my flat a local butcher, and paid more like 4.99/lb. So not cheap. But yes... 9:30 am into the PBC, eating about 3:30. And it was sooo good. I cannot explain it.

                          • mayapoppa
                            mayapoppa commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Oh, and I pulled from the PBC at 170-180 internal, and it went into a 275 oven for about 2 hours.

                          • JPP
                            JPP commented
                            Editing a comment
                            My hof was $1.99/lb. And while it was nearly 7 lbs, I wrapped after five hours, and it was at 203 after six. Somebody smarter than me ( when in doubt, blame the spouse! Works both ways in case anyone thinks I'm singling out the ladies here!) insisted it be served immediately... While it was a bit dry and not as tender as it could've been, it was not dreadful!

                            BTW 4.99 is still cheaper than the going rate here in Massachusetts.
                            Last edited by JPP; May 30, 2015, 06:17 AM.

                          #15
                          That looks great!

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