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Cornish hen...

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    Cornish hen...

    Anyone done Cornish hens? Hang them or on the grill grate?

    #2
    I hang every thing, EVERYTHIHNG. And with them little dudes, a 350 barrel temp will work great.

    The following is from Doc Blonder's website....

    The key to roasting chicken (or turkey) is to cook slowly enough to be sure the outside bakes at the same pace as the interior, so the inside still isn't raw when the outside is done. This suggests a low temperature. On the other hand, most people prefer the look, flavor and taste of crisp skin. This suggests a high temperature.
    So the cooking temperature depends on the weight of the bird. A small 3 pound bird can be cooked at 400F, and the inside and outside will be close enough in temperature to finish simultaneously. For a 5 lb bird, cook at 325F until the breast reaches 155F, then move off the indirect zone on a grill, or under the broiler in an oven, and crisp the skin.
    Last edited by Jerod Broussard; December 28, 2014, 02:25 PM.

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    • SmokinBee BBQ
      SmokinBee BBQ commented
      Editing a comment
      So wide open. Thanks!

    #3
    I've cooked many Cornish hens on my crappy 7-in-1, as well as my crappier offset. I also cook these a fair amount at work for banquets. Jerod's above mentioned technique is effective. So is real slow at 200 followed by higher heat to crisp the skin. The heat source is irrelevant , as far as culinary technique is concerned. I don't hang mine, but that is because it is just easier with my rig to just put them on the grates. I turn if needed, but for cornish hens, it usually isn't necessary, on my rig. If needed, I've gone as high as 400-425. Sometimes, on the job, you make the best of a challenging situation. As fowl is usually pretty forgiving, don't worry and just cook. You'll find what works for your situation(s) and sensibilities.

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      #4
      If I can hang quail, you can hang cornish hens. Advantage of hanging is probably fairly equal hot air surrounding the food.

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        #5
        Ahhhh Earnest, I love when you chime in. Your voluminous pics really, really help, as does your input. You are correct when you mention the even heat when hanging. I guess it just depends on the end product being what you prefer. No wrong answer, if you and yours like it, then it's "right."

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