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Meat-Up in Memphis

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Order men's and women's T-Shirts, Sweatshirts, Aprons, Mugs, Caps, Tote Bags, Flasks, and more, all imprinted with the Pitmaster Club logo. There's even a spiral bound journal where you can make notes on your cooks.

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BBQ Stars

SPOTLIGHT

Some Of Our Favorite
Tools And Toys

These are not ads. These are products we love and highly recommend. Click here to read more about our medals and what they mean.

 


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Surely you know somebody who loves outdoor cooking who deserves a gift for the holidays, birthday, anniversary, or just for being wonderful. There he is, right in the mirror! Here are our selections of best ideas, all Platinum or Gold Medalists, listed by price.

Click here to see our list of Gold Medal Gifts


Digital Thermometers Are Your Most Valuable Tool And Here's A Great Buy!

maverick PT55 thermometer

A good digital thermometer keeps you from serving dry overcooked food or dangerously undercooked food. They are much faster and much more accurate than dial thermometers. YOU NEED ONE!

Click here for more info on the Maverick PT-55 Waterproof Instant-Read Thermometer Review shown above. It may be the best value in a thermometer out there


If you have a Weber Kettle, you need the Slow 'N' Sear

slow n sear

The Slow 'N' Sear turns your grill into a first class smoker and also creates an extremely hot sear zone you can use to create steakhouse steaks.

Click here for our article on this breakthrough tool


Bring The Heat With Broil King Signet's Dual Tube Burners

the good one grill

The Broil King Signet 320 is a modestly priced, 3-burner gas grill that packs a lot of value and power under the hood. Broil King's proprietary, dual-tube burners get hot fast and are able to achieve high, searing temps that rival most comparatively priced gas grills. The quality cast aluminum housing carries a Limited Lifetime Warranty.

Click here to read our complete review


The Good-One Is A Superb Grill And A Superb Smoker All In One

the good one grill

The Good-One Open Range is a charcoal grill with an offset smoke chamber attached. It is dramatically different from a traditional offset smoker. The grill sits low in front and doubles as a firebox for the smoke chamber which is spliced on above and behind so it can work like a horizontal offset smoker only better. By placing the heat source behind and under the smokebox instead of off to the side, Open Range produces even temperature from left to right, something almost impossible to achieve with a standard barrel shaped offset.

Click here to read our complete review


Pit Barrel Cooker Smoker

Griddle And Deep Fryer All In One

The flat top does the burgers and the fryer does the fries. Use the griddle for bacon, eggs, and home fries. Or pancakes, fajitas, grilled cheese, you name it. Why stink up the house deep frying and spatter all over? Do your fried chicken and calamari outside. Blackstone's Rangetop Combo With Deep Fryer does it all. Plus it has a built in cutting board, garbage bag holder, and paper towel holder. An additional work table on the left side provides plenty of counter space.

Click here to read our detailed review and to order


Pit Barrel Cooker Smoker

The Pit Barrel Cooker May Be Too Easy

The PBC has a rabid cult following for good reason. It is absolutely positively without a doubt the best bargain on a smoker in the world. Period. This baby will cook circles around the cheap offset sideways barrel smokers in the hardware stores because temperature control is so much easier. Best of all, it is only 9 delivered to your door!

Click here to read our detailed review and the raves from people who own them


The Swiss Army Knife Of Thermometers

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The smart folks at ThermoWorks have finally done it: The Swiss Army Knife of thermometers, two in one. Start with the industry standard food thermometer, the Thermapen MK4, (Platinum Medal winner) truly instant (2 to 3 seconds) precise (+ or – 0.7°F). Then they built in an infrared thermometer ideal for measuring the temps of pizza stones, griddles, and frying pans (also great for finding leaks around doors and windows in your house).

Click here to read our test results and comprehensive review and why it won our Platinum Medal.


Compact Powerful Sear Machine For Your Next Tailgater

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Char-Broil's Grill2Go x200 is a super-portable, fun little sizzler made of heavy, rust-proof cast aluminum. The lid snaps shut. Grab the handle and you're off to the party! Char-Broil's TRU-Infrared design produces searing heat while reducing fuel consumption. A 16 ounce LP gas canister is enough to keep you flipping burgers for hours.

Click here to read our detailed review and to order


The Cool Kettle With The Hinged Hood We Always Wanted

NK-22-Ck Grill

Their NK22CK-C Charcoal Kettle Grill puts a few spins on the familiar kettle design. In fact, the hinged lid with a handle on the front, spins in a rotary motion 180 degrees. It's hard to beat a Weber kettle, but Napoleon holds its own and adds some unique features to make the NK22CK-C a viable alternative.

Click here for more about what makes this grill special


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G&F Suede Welder's Gloves

Heat Resistant Gloves With Extra Long Sleeves Hold The Hot Stuff

If you're using oven mitts at the grill, it's time to trade up. Say hello to these suede welder's gloves. They're heat resistant enough to handle hot grill grates, and flexible enough to handle tongs. The extra long sleeves even let you reach deep into the firebox to move hot logs without getting burned. Our Fave.

Click here to read our detailed review

Click here to order from Amazon


GrillGrates Take Gas Grills To The Infrared Zone

grill grates

GrillGrates(TM) amplify heat, prevent flareups, make flipping foods easier, keep small foods from committing suicide, kill hotspots, are easier to clean, flip over to make a fine griddle, and can be easily removed and moved from one grill to another. You can even throw wood chips, pellets, or sawdust between the rails and deliver a quick burst of smoke to whatever is above. Every gas grill needs them.

Click here for more about what makes these grates so special


kareubequ bbq smoker

Our Favorite Backyard Smoker

The amazing Karubecue is the most innovative smoker in the world. The quality of meat from this machine is astonishing. At its crux is a patented firebox that burns logs above the cooking chamber and sucks heat and extremely clean blue smoke into the thermostat controlled oven. It is our favorite smoker, period.

Click here for our review of this superb smoker


Masterbuilt MPS 340/G ThermoTemp XL Propane Smoker

masterbuilt gas smoker

The First Propane Smoker With A Thermostat Makes This Baby Foolproof

Set ThermoTemp's dial from 175° to 350°F and the thermostat inside will adjust the burner just like an indoor kitchen oven. All you need to do is add wood to the tray above the burner to start smokin'.

Click here to read our detailed review


Professional Steakhouse Knife Set

masterbuilt gas smoker

Our founder, Meathead, wanted the same steak knives used by steakhouses such as Peter Luger, Smith & Wollensky, Morton's, Kobe Club, Palm, and many others. So he located the manufacturer and had them stamp our name on some. They boast pointed, temper-ground, serrated, high-carbon stainless-steel, half-tang blades with excellent cutting edge ability. The beefy hardwood handle provides a comfortable grip secured by three hefty rivets. He has machine washed his more than 100 times. They have never rusted and they stay shiny without polishing. Please note that we do not make, sell, or distribute these knives, they just engrave them with our name.

Click here to read our detailed review and to order


PK 360 grill

Is This Superb Charcoal Grill A Kamado Killer?

The PK-360, with 360 square inches of cooking space, this rust free, cast aluminum charcoal grill is durable and easy to use. Four-way venting means it's easy to set up for two zone cooking with more control than single vent Kamado grills. It is much easier to set up for 2-zone cooking than any round kamado. Beautifully designed and completely portable. Meathead says it is his preferrred grill.

Click here to read our detailed review of the PK 360

Click here to order it direct from PK and get a special deal for AmazingRibs.com readers only


Fireboard: The Ultimate Top Of The Line BBQ Thermometer

fireboard bbq thermometer

With the ability to monitor up to six temperatures simultaneously with either Bluetooth or Wifi on your mobile phone, tablet, or computer, Fireboard is the best digital thermometer we’ve tested.

Click here to read our detailed review


Finally, A Great Portable Pellet Smoker

Green Mountain Davey Crockett Grill

Green Mountain's portable Davy Crockett Pellet Smoker is one mean tailgating and picnic machine. But it's also gaining popularity with people who want to add a small, set it and forget it pellet smoker to their backyard arsenal. And with their WiFi capabilities you can control and monitor Davy Crocket from your smart phone or laptop.

Click here to read our detailed review and to order

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Meat-Up in Memphis 2020

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Book recommendation

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  • Top | #1

    Book recommendation

    For Homebrewing, thank you in advance. P.s. I prefer something that will explain some of the science.

  • Top | #2
    "The Complete Joy of Home Brewing" by Charlie Papazian is a great place to start.

    Comment


    • Top | #3
      jfmorris

      Comment


      • Top | #4
        Byron Burch’s seminal 1986 book: “Brewing Quality Beers: The Home Brewer’s Essential Guidebook.”

        Comment


        • Top | #5
          If you want to understand how home brewing works, and the science behind it, I would recommend one of the more recent editions of "How To Brew" by John Palmer as a general purpose introduction to home brewing.

          https://www.amazon.com/How-Brew-Ever...-1-spons&psc=1

          The other book I would have in my library (and do) is Brewing Classic Styles:

          https://www.amazon.com/Brewing-Class...gateway&sr=8-2

          That has a good recipe for all 80 of the styles in the 2008 BJCP beer style guidelines. I imagine it will be updated eventually, but lets face it - the 2015 BJCP style guides suck rocks. They eliminated a lot of styles I and my home-brew club members brew (robust porter! Southern/Northern English Browns!), and created some styles for no good reason.

          I would hesitate to get a book from the 80's or 90's, that has no edition created in this decade, as things have changed a LOT since then. Ingredients, both malt and yeast, are much better than what was available back then. For example, all the old books recommend, rightly for the times, doing a primary and a secondary fermentation. Secondaries are now no longer needed or recommended except for the biggest of beers, or maybe a fruit addition.

          Anyway, enjoy getting into home brewing. You can spend as much or as little as you want on equipment, but I do highly recommend getting into all-grain brewing versus extract brewing when you can. I received 3 Northern Brewer extract kits last November, due to a shipping error by Northern Brewer (I had ordered some grain and hops!). They told me to keep them, and made it right by getting me the stuff I did order, and I decided to make one of the kits over the winter. While not BAD beer, it certainly was not great beer by any means.

          Comment


          • Richard Chrz
            Richard Chrz commented
            Editing a comment
            thank you, yes I want the science end of it first.

          • mnavarre
            mnavarre commented
            Editing a comment
            Agreed, "How to Brew" is pretty much the best book for homebrewers from a science standpoint. "Designing Great Beers" is another book that's pretty much a go to when I'm making up a new recipe.

        • Top | #6
          Richard Chrz this is based on an older version of the book How to Brew, but is a free online resource where you can read most of the text from one of the earlier editions:

          http://www.howtobrew.com

          Your basic equipment for brewing consists of:

          1. Kettle large enough to heat water in (for mash with all-grain), and for boiling the wort. I started with a 7 gallon turkey fryer pot, and now use a "keggle" - a 15.5 gallon keg with the top cut out to serve as a kettle. The minimum size would be a 5 gallon pot for partial volume boils with an extract kit. I recommend 10+ gallons, to help avoid boiling over, as you boil about 7 gallons for a 5 gallon batch of beer.

          2. Burner - you really don't want to be doing this on the stove with a 12,000 BTU burner. I use a 60,000 BTU Bayou Classic SQ14 burner.

          3. Mash tun - basically a cooler with a CPVC manifold and ball valve. This lets you mash the grains (steep them in hot water) for the all grain mash step. You can skip this if doing extract brewing.

          4. Fermentation vessel. This can be a plastic bucket with a lid with 0-ring, and an air lock, a glass carboy, or one of the newer plastic carboy style fermenters. My current favorite is a Speidel 30L fermenter, due to ease of cleaning compared to my glass carboys. https://www.morebeer.com/products/sp...0l-79-gal.html

          5. Bottling or kegging equipment.

          I first got into brewing with a bunch of brown bottles and a cheap bottle capper, a plastic fermenting bucket (7 gallons I think it was), a used turkey fryer pot and burner off the side of the road, and an old 40 quart cooler. Probably under $50 actual cash outlay. Now I use a bigger cooler for mashing (60 quart), have a grain mill for crushing the barley, thermostatic controllers to keep fermentation temperatures controlled, and at least 10 5 gallon Cornelius (Pepsi) kegs.

          Comment


          • Richard Chrz
            Richard Chrz commented
            Editing a comment
            Thankfully I do have two friends that own a micro brewery, fairly decent size one. They actually offered to have me come to the brewery and they would help me make a 12 keg batch and send it out to area bars. But, I declined for now, and just asked if I needed some help, would they. I will definitely start out with Extracts, while I learn more, and how far I want to go down this rabbit hole. lol (I am trying to do this without bothering them).
            Last edited by Richard Chrz; July 1st, 2019, 01:17 PM.

          • ComfortablyNumb
            ComfortablyNumb commented
            Editing a comment
            Richard Chrz That hole can be deep, but doesn't have to be. I started out making five gallon extract batches using a pot, carboy, a bucket and bottling. Wound up doing ten gallon all grain twice a month and kegging with this for equipment;
            https://www.morebeer.com/products/ti...lpture-v4.html
            https://www.morebeer.com/products/mo...er-14-gal.html

          • AverageJoe
            AverageJoe commented
            Editing a comment
            Richard Chrz I am not sure how much you have already, but this is a good starter homebrew kit that is done through Northern Brewer. It has everything except the Kettle for $199. They also have a popup that came through when I was on there for an additional 5% off your first order by entering your email address.

            https://www.northernbrewer.com/colle...ng-starter-kit

        • Top | #7
          I haven't brewed in years, something I hope to correct sooner rather than later. The only book I kept was 'Designing Great Beers'. Part One explains ingredients, their role and function. Part Two describes various styles and how to achieve them. It is not a recipe book, nor is it a 'how to' book. Part One will explain a lot of the science and you'll understand the roles each ingredient play. Part Two will help you form your own recipes for the style of beer you want to brew.

          My question is, are you now a homebrewer or on the doorstep looking in?

          Comment


          • Richard Chrz
            Richard Chrz commented
            Editing a comment
            door step, looking at the directions I got, to get to the doorway,

        • Top | #8
          Something I will add, 150+ kegs of beer into this hobby, is that it can seem intimidating at first, but it really isn't. The foremost principle I will stress is that sanitation and cleaning are fundamental. ANYTHING, and I mean anything, that touches the wort once you turn off the flame for the boil (or turn off the element in an electric brewery setup) MUST be sanitized properly. This includes your fermenter, any siphons, hoses, funnels, and so on that touch the wort (which is what we call the boiled "barley syrup sugar water" before it is fermented into beer). This is easy with modern food grade no rinse sanitizers such as StarSan (which I buy by the gallon jug).

          Second only to sanitization is fermentation temperature control. You need to be aware of the temperatures the yeast you choose can tolerate, and what they perform best at. Most general purpose ale yeasts ferment best in the mid to upper 60's - I keep my fermentation chamber (an old mini-fridge modified to hold a fermenter) set to 68F for most ale ferments. Lager yeasts need to ferment in the mid to upper 40's to do their best. Some yeast likes it at other temperatures (I do my hefeweizen's at 63F), and some Belgian yeast can tolerate mid 70's. Fermenting outside the temperature range of the yeast will lead to flawed beer with off flavors.

          Third, do not, I repeat DO NOT, cover your boil kettle during the boil. There are volatile compounds that NEED to off gas during the boil, and covering the kettle prevents this. You need stuff to boil off, to prevent formation of DMS (Dimethyl sulfides). And be sure to boil at least 60 minutes, sometimes 90 is required depending on the grain bill used. I caught the 20-something kid that used to live next door to me out on his patio brewing in covered kettles, and had previously sampled some of his proudly presented home brew - it was awful stuff with creamed corn flavors (DMS) and a nice rotten egg surfur aroma. You don't want to be that guy. I politely swallowed what I could, and gave him a few pointers.

          There are a million and one flaws that can occur in beer, and its not just home brewers - I've had some horrible examples of commercial "craft" beer that was flawed. But you can avoid most of the notable flaws through proper sanitation, temperature control, and process.
          Last edited by jfmorris; July 1st, 2019, 12:20 PM.

          Comment


          • ComfortablyNumb
            ComfortablyNumb commented
            Editing a comment
            The only thing I would add would be to get the wort temp down ASAP and get the yeast pitched to minimize bacteria issues. Which is why I recommend the home made wort chiller as basic. Much fewer sanitation problems with ice and partial boils.

          • Richard Chrz
            Richard Chrz commented
            Editing a comment
            So, you nailed it! I am hyper sensitive to the sanitation part of this. Like you said, it can be intimidating. And it does intimidate it,

        • Top | #9
          Richard Chrz Don't get intimidated!

          I second ComfortablyNumb in recommending morebeer.com for purchasing equipment and ingredients. Northern Brewer is where I started, and once I did maybe 2 extract kits, I went ahead and built a mash tun, and got into all-grain brewing once I had the basics of sanitizing and fermenting down pat. northernbrewer.com offers a LOT of extract kits and easy to follow directions.

          I would go to morebeer.com or northernbrewer.com and start with one of their "starter" kits if you have nothing, which will include some basic equipment. If you have a turkey fryer burner and pot, you can start with that. If you don't have anything, I recommend at least a 10 gallon pot, as it will grow with you from extract to all grain brewing.

          Here is what I mean by a starter kit:

          https://www.morebeer.com/category/ho...wing-kits.html

          https://www.northernbrewer.com/colle...-homebrew-kits

          Those will give you some basic fermenters and bottling equipment. Some of the kits have a 5 gallon pot - useful only for partial volume extract brewing, where you brew less than 5 gallons - usually 3 - and add water at the end to the fermenter. I started with a 7 gallon turkey fryer pot, and then moved to a 15.5 gallon keggle. 10 gallons would be a great all around size.

          Comment


          • Richard Chrz
            Richard Chrz commented
            Editing a comment
            I am hoping I can figure out some 1-2 gallon batches (although, I assume the measurements are not just linear and dividable, or take a 5 gallon batch into (5) 1 gallon carboys. I think I have most of the equipment for the extract as my wife bought me a kit for a bourbon barrel stout a few years ago, I put it in a closet and have not touched it since. I did not see any dates on anything that said, "use by" on them. Keep the advice coming!!!

          • jfmorris
            jfmorris commented
            Editing a comment
            Richard Chrz I would not use extract kit ingredients - hops, yeast or grain - that is old. Hops should always be stored in the freezer to prevent decay/degradation (the alpha acids for bitterness have a half life), and yeast should be stored in the fridge. Only dry malt extract would still be usable at this point. Obviously the equipment is fine.

        • Top | #10
          Richard Chrz you can do 1 or 2 gallon batches, but... why?

          A 1 gallon glass jug cannot be filled to capacity for fermenting beer, as you need headspace for the krausen - otherwise it will all be foaming out the airlock. 5 gallons is 40 pints of beer, or 52 12 ounce brown bottles. 1 gallon is like 8-10 beers. Considering it takes the same amount of time to brew 1 gallon as to brew 5, its just a lot of effort for little return, in my book.

          Grains and malt extract scale pretty linearly, but hop additions do not. And... boil off is a constant for a given pot diameter. So, if you make 5 gallons, and your boil off rate is 1 gallon per hour (mine is around 1.5 gallons boiled off per hour), you have to start with 6. If you do a 1 gallon batch in the same pot, you would need to boil 2, to end with 1. And you have loss due to true (settled out yeast and debris) in the bottom of the fermenter.

          Example. I start with 7 gallons. It boils down to 6 gallons, maybe a little less. When I rack to the fermenter, I lose a half gallon to the pot, as you don't want to siphon the stuff that settles out like hop pellets, cold break, etc). So I have 5.5 in the fermenter. When I keg, I lose another half gallon to debris and yeast in the bottom of the fermenter.

          I guess I am just saying, yes, you can do a 1 gallon batch, but it won't scale linearly from a 5 gallon recipe. Now, sure - you can split a larger batch into multiple fermenters. I often do 10 gallon batches (13 gallons when I start the boil), and split that into two 7.5 gallon carboys for fermentation, and have two 5 gallon kegs of finished product.

          All this reminds me... I gotta get busy brewing for my nieces wedding soon. I got burned out brewing beer for my daughters wedding last summer, gotta repeat this summer.

          Comment


          • Richard Chrz
            Richard Chrz commented
            Editing a comment
            So, I have introduced myself here a few places. But, I am currently in an electric wheelchair, and have nerve disease that affects lot's of systems in my body, and strength is one of them, I am trying to use all of this free time I have (I am in the hospital roughly 16 hours a week getting infusions. But, back to strength. I try not to get myself into any situation I can not get myself out of. Lifting 5 gallons of whatever that is hot on a burner is not something I can lift to get out of if need

        • Top | #11
          But, I could likely easily enough get someone to come over and do the heavy lifting. So, not saying it has to be, it would just allow me to be a lot more independent with it.

          Comment


          • ComfortablyNumb
            ComfortablyNumb commented
            Editing a comment
            I would strongly suggest a brew buddy. Find someone who either brews, or wants to learn.. Split the costs and the results. Or if you are flush, buy the equipment and split the costs of the ingredients. It isn't practical to do less than five gallons, so if you want to pursue the hobby and can't lift, get a friend. You can get brew systems that use pumps, but that can get pricey. Wish you were close, I'd partner up with you.

          • Richard Chrz
            Richard Chrz commented
            Editing a comment
            p.s. it is not a bad thing it is just a thing. I always find work around's. Personally, I like to prove what you can do, instead of focusing on what you can not do., as long as it does not add to my wife's to do list in helping me out.
            Last edited by Richard Chrz; July 1st, 2019, 07:51 PM.

          • jfmorris
            jfmorris commented
            Editing a comment
            Richard Chrz I had no idea of your circumstance before. I've got some ideas on how you can deal with larger batches of beer without much lifting involved. Gravity can be used to drain from a pot that has a ball valve into a fermenter on the ground for example. An electric pump can be used to transfer wort or hot water uphill. There are a lot of ways to solve these issues.

        • Top | #12
          Here's something interesting, uses a pump or gravity, looks like lifting could be minimised. I don't know anything about it, but I do know the folks at morebeer, they could answer any questions.

          https://www.morebeer.com/products/an...em-65-gal.html

          Comment


          • jfmorris
            jfmorris commented
            Editing a comment
            This is exactly what I am thinking. Maybe he could in fact do half batches (2.5 to 3 gallons) - I would not bother with less than that. Use a pot with a ball valve to drain from the stove top (or burner top if outside) into the fermenter. He still needs someone to pick up the fermenter at some point.

          • jfmorris
            jfmorris commented
            Editing a comment
            That Anvil system is the cheapest electric brewery I've seen yet! I am guessing at the end of the mash, you have to lift a basket or mesh bag of grain out of the top, sort of like a BIAB (Brew in a bag) setup?

        • Top | #13
          Thank you! I will check that out. I love workarounds! Nice screen name by the way!

          Comment


          • Top | #14
            jfmorris
            Like I said, I am unfamiliar with the system, but it looks like you can do an extract batch start to finish in it. 24" tall it could set on a table and be easily filled. After chilling he could transfer handleable amounts ( a half to one gallon at a time which would aid in aeration) to a fermenter. This one would be a good choice as it has a spigot or a bottling bucket, set high on a table and gravity transferred to a bottling bucket which then could be gravity transferred to bottles. Might have to bend over a little, but other than the transfer to fermenter it seems to me the entire process could be done without heavy lifting. And if he makes the step to all grain the Anvil system says it does that, so no equipment upgrade would be required.

            Comment


            • Top | #15
              Richard Chrz this is from my local homebrew store. They sell 1 or 5 gallon kits that come with instructions from the company called Brewers Best. These are what I started on about ten years ago and I now do all grain brewing and some partial mash. You should be able to google a homebrew shop close to you and theoretically they may sell these as well.

              https://www.quirkyhomebrew.com/all-p...1-gallon-kits/

              Comment

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