Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you are a member you must log in now. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Suggestions on a non stick fry pan

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Suggestions on a non stick fry pan

    Looking for a decent not stick frying pan. I struggle keeping a good one. It either gets damage in non stick or gets this strange caked layer that doesn't come off. I have had cusinart, faberware, kirkland, and members mark. I feel like there is more but drawing a blank. I want to spend less than 50 unless we are talking a lifetime pan or set. Any help would be awesome. When I can't cook outside. Like it for eggs , sausage, chicken, and any other meat that needs a quick brown.

    #2
    Cast iron.

    Comment


    • Oak Smoke
      Oak Smoke commented
      Editing a comment
      +1

    #3
    Buy Cast Iron.

    Season th ever lovin Hail outta it...

    Poof. Yer THERE!!!!

    Comment


      #4
      The best you can get is simple:



      To 'unscrew' my wise butt but totally sincere reply, other than CI I only have one set of non-stick stuff these days, the 'copper' colored stuff. The manufacturer suggests not using oil or butter - that's a pipe dream - but use Very Little and always clean thoroughly immediately after use while still warm - that will prevent the cakey buildup.

      Comment


      • Macktechie
        Macktechie commented
        Editing a comment
        How do you clean something that they suggest not using soap for? Mainly because I don't know

      • mnavarre
        mnavarre commented
        Editing a comment
        Mostly just wipe 'em out with hot water and a dishcloth, if there's stuff stuck on a stiff scrub brush or a nylon scraper. If there's really stubborn stuff use a chainmail hanky. If it's properly seasoned it'll clean pretty easily. And the soap thing is B.S., you ain't gonna hurt your seasoning with dish soap, use it if you need it. Just don't soak it and don't go to town on it with a Chore-Boy. It'll be fine. It's cast iron, not rocket surgery.

      • JGo37
        JGo37 commented
        Editing a comment
        Agree completely with mnavarre set your hot water heater on 120F, get a stiff nylon dish brush - you'll never need more than a drop or two of Dawn. I will say I put a drop or two (at MOST) of grape oil on my CI every time after cleaning and rub it in by hand. That said, my CI is seasoned so well that after rubbing in ONE DROP I usually need to dab up the excess with a paper towel.

      #5
      Gonna agree with the cast iron recs, but if you need a regular old non-stick just realize that they're basically disposable. I wouldn't spend more than $30 for a 10 inch non stick. Faberware and OxO have skillets in that price range, or if you have a restaurant supply store you can just get whatever's around that range. Just avoid the super cheap stuff from Wally World.

      Comment


        #6
        A tip on making nonstick frying pans last longer is to never use them on heat higher than medium heat. High heat shortens their life.

        Comment


        • JGo37
          JGo37 commented
          Editing a comment
          Yep - you want to use them with anything that doesn't brown due to it's flash point. You need to be able to 'swirl around' the food, flip it, slide it, slip it out - if you can't, it's too hot or the wrong pan. Macktechie

        #7
        I bought a 2 pan set of T-fal which was recommended by America's Test Kitchen. They weren't expensive and have held up pretty well.
        Last edited by Dewesq55; September 13, 2020, 07:04 AM.

        Comment


        • Jerod Broussard
          Jerod Broussard commented
          Editing a comment
          That's what I'm talking about, 98.2% of my genetics come from France.

        #8
        A food site I can't remember said that there are really no long lasting non-stick coated pans. Their suggestion was to buy cheap and replace as needed...

        Comment


        #9
        Tramontina Pro.

        Comment


        #10
        Cast Iron or carbon steel which are well seasoned are awesome. Last December all of our "non-stick" pans were trashed. I purchased non-stick skillets (small, medium, and large) from Made In Cookware. They were reasonably priced. They get used frequently and have withstood lots of cooking of a variety of things. Highly recommend them. Good luck on your search.

        Comment


          #11
          I have used T-fal as well. This is rated #1 by Americas Test Kitchen and is $40.

          Comment


            #12
            Aside from seconding the suggestions for a good 12" cast iron skillet (I have a Lodge), I really like my Oxo 12" non-stick, which is highly rated in this article, which I found extremely helpful in building a new set of kitchen cookware for us:

            https://www.cooksillustrated.com/art...h_experience_3

            They suggest this one:

            https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PCI6XP6/?tag=cioarticle-20

            I have the Pro, which has gone up $20 since I bought it (probably COVID).

            Great non-stick.
            Last edited by jfmorris; September 13, 2020, 06:20 AM.

            Comment


              #13
              Here's the reason I don't like non-stick pans... when the coating wears out... where do you think it's going? Yeah... into the food.

              Comment


                #14
                Non stick pans are cheap and disposable...they don’t last long. The non stick coating will end up in your food. Get some cast iron.

                Comment


                • LDimick
                  LDimick commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Actually, most of it may come off in the washing and scrubbing and it ends up down the sink.

                #15
                Cast iron, cast iron, cast iron... yada, yada, yada....

                I have a non-stick pan that I use pretty much for eggs and omelettes. I'm not going to break my back trying to make a rolled french style omelette or delicate crepes with a cast iron skillet. Too heavy and the wrong shape.

                For most everything else, yes, cast iron wins.

                Comment


                • JackJ
                  JackJ commented
                  Editing a comment
                  For crepes and omelettes I like carbon steel for the reasons you state: lighter and most have a better shape with a shallower slope to the sides.

                • TripleB
                  TripleB commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Spot on. Love my CI and use it all the time, but for omelets and quick poached eggs, I go with my inexpensive (not thin and cheap) Smart & Final non-stick pan.

              Announcement

              Collapse
              No announcement yet.
              Working...
              X
              false
              0
              Guest
              500
              ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
              false
              false
              {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
              Yes

              Spotlight

              These are not paid placements, they are a curated selection of reviewed products.

              All of the products below have been tested and are highly recommended. Click here to read more about our review process.

              Use Our Links To Help Keep Us Alive

              Many merchants pay us a small referral fee when you click our “buy now” links. This has zero impact on the price you pay but helps support the site.


              Big. Bold. Flavor.

              Meathead's Amazing rubs and sauce

              Introduce big, bold flavor to your BBQ and grilling creations thanks to the Meathead’s Amazing line of pork, red meat, and poultry rubs as well as a KC-style BBQ sauce. Click here to read more and to purchase.


              A Propane Smoker That Performs Under Pressure

              The Masterbuilt MPS 340/G ThermoTemp XL Propane Smoker is the first propane smoker with a thermostat, making this baby foolproof. All you need to do is add wood to the tray above the burner to start smokin’. Click here to read our detailed review.


              The Good-One Is A Superb Grill And A Superb Smoker All In One


              The Good-One Open Range is dramatically different from a traditional offset smoker, placing the heat source behind and under the smokebox instead of off to the side. Click here to read our complete review.


              Our Favorite Backyard Smoker

              The amazing Karubecue is the most innovative smoker in the world. At its crux is a patented firebox that burns logs above the cooking chamber and sucks heat and extremely clean blue smoke into the thermostat-controlled oven. Click here for our review of this superb smoker.