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Confused! I thought we were looking for uniform searing, not grate marks Am I uttering Heresy?

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    Confused! I thought we were looking for uniform searing, not grate marks Am I uttering Heresy?

    I took the plunge last fall and ordered a set of Grill Grates for my 5 year old Weber Summit. I have been switching between the original round rod grill that comes with the Summit, and the GGs. Yes, the Grill Grates spatula is great for being able to lift a slice of rich Atlantic or King salmon from the grill without it breaking. My usual techique calls for about 80 seconds per each of 4 sides of approximately 6-8 oz slices off of the front end of a large salmon filet. The original Weber makes a more uniform maillard reaction, with caramelized surface. The Grill Grates makes hot grill marks, and even if I rotate 90 degrees every 20-30 secs, it's not as uniform a maillard as the Weber grates. But, I admit, it never breaks into pieces, given the great GG spatula.

    Same with steaks. Heavy grill marking, instead of uniform browning. So, my question for MeatheadHuskee , and the rest of y'all, how do you square your teachings on 'Grill marks not good. Uniform browning good.' with the results with GGs. Yes, easier to flip and turn. Yes, hotter, but not uniform maillard, at least with the rails upward. Is the emperor naked?

    Let me know if I am excommunicated. Or, if for penance, I need to say 10 cosa nostras and put some money in the cup.

    This is with the Weber round rods:

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    Last edited by new2smoking; April 2, 2020, 06:56 PM.

    #2
    Turn the grill grates upside down and use them kind of like a griddle. Lots of posts about that.

    https://amazingribs.com/cast-aluminu...grillgrates-tm
    Last edited by Nate; April 2, 2020, 06:34 PM.

    Comment


    • Donw
      Donw commented
      Editing a comment
      +1

    • Mr. Bones
      Mr. Bones commented
      Editing a comment
      ^this^

    #3
    Do what works for you
    not a big fan of everything for everything I cook
    ,,,,,, what time is supper,,,,looks good
    Last edited by Greygoose; April 2, 2020, 06:35 PM.

    Comment


      #4
      I think both have merit. I'm probably shooting for even searing on a steak but some nice grill marks on a chicken thigh does look great and tastes good too.

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      • new2smoking
        new2smoking commented
        Editing a comment
        So those steaks are on round rods, with IR beneath? Pretty

      • Attjack
        Attjack commented
        Editing a comment
        Yeah, I have not used my grill grates since I replaced my gas Weber with a gas powered Blaze. I love its sear burner. I don't think grill grates would work over a sear burner though. Probably too hot for the aluminum.

      #5
      Was just about to say what Nate just said, more surface area for searing = flat side of GGs.

      Comment


      • Attjack
        Attjack commented
        Editing a comment
        Yeah, I mainly use the flat side too. More surface contact and less clean up.

      • new2smoking
        new2smoking commented
        Editing a comment
        With re: to the flat side: Is it radiating heat, vs contact (conduction)? I'm asking for a friend. The friend is a bone-in lamb chop or a steak whose bone keeps the meat from full contact. And, if no bone, do you have to push down, lay a brick on it, etc?

      • Attjack
        Attjack commented
        Editing a comment
        With either side of the grill grate, or any grate, or cast iron for that matter I try to push down enough to get full contact. I think contact is key and the flat side gets you the most contact.

      #6
      BANISHED!!!!! Haha.

      Make what ya like, eat what ya like, make no apologies.

      Comment


        #7
        I use the flat side for steaks and burgers, the rails side for fish, chicken and veggies.

        Comment


        • new2smoking
          new2smoking commented
          Editing a comment
          jfmorris So, for steaks, is it with your burners on high, so that the 'griddle' is very hot?

        #8
        new2smoking Yes, with my gas grill, I run the burners on high with the flat side up on the Grillgrates to sear my steaks, after cooking them indirect until about 120F. I get it as hot as I can - 700+ for searing.

        I do smash burgers all the time on the flat side as well, preheat on high, then run around medium, to keep the grates at 350 or so.

        Here are some pics showing how I use them...

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        • jfmorris
          jfmorris commented
          Editing a comment
          As you can see, I still keep my original grates around for when I want to cook with cast iron on the grill. It works nicely to mix ridge or flat side, or even a section of the original grate at times.

        • Donw
          Donw commented
          Editing a comment
          I’ll have what jfmorris is having!

        • jfmorris
          jfmorris commented
          Editing a comment
          Donw thanks! I was just looking through my photos for some typical cooks where I use Grillgrates, and those were the most recent examples.

        #9
        Another thing.... grill marks aren’t bad... in fact they are delicious.... they just don’t provide an optimal result for the Maillard reaction.

        Comment


          #10
          Sometimes you just can't avoid grill marks, especially on foods that cook fast like seafood.

          Comment


          • fracmeister
            fracmeister commented
            Editing a comment
            If you cooked salmon till it was brown all over on the grill it might well be too long... I do it in CI. I also think the grill marks on white fish are nice...

          #11
          We eat with our eyes first, so I like the looks of grill marks, dark-chocolate-caramelized ones.

          Comment


          • Meathead
            Meathead commented
            Editing a comment
            Read this https://amazingribs.com/more-techniq...hould-not-flip

          • jfmorris
            jfmorris commented
            Editing a comment
            Meathead good article as always! I keep part of my gas grill setup with flat GrillGrates as a sear station for steaks or making smash burgers for that very reason, or just go 1000F+ with the SnS for searing. The rails of the GrillGrates I use for the more delicate stuff you outline, and I only use the wire grates when smoking.

          • bbqLuv
            bbqLuv commented
            Editing a comment
            A seared steak with out grill marks, would that be considered GRIDDLE marks?

          #12
          Stripes for show...……..solid for go!




          Okay, okay, I do agree that chicken presents better with stripes, but that's show ain't it?

          Comment


          • Meathead
            Meathead commented
            Editing a comment
            Pretty hard to get chicken dark all over, true.

          #13
          I like the looks of the grill marks. Personally, I don't think it makes that much difference in the taste. If its a bone in piece, I think the bone prevents a nice even sear on a flat surface, so would prefer those pretty cross marks. I use the GGs both ways, depending on how I feel that day. I like the flat side for fish and burgers.

          Comment


          • Mr. Bones
            Mr. Bones commented
            Editing a comment
            I also very much likeys th grill marks, ain't gonna lie.
            Reckon mosta my life, grill marks was considered a 'Badge of Honour', a 'Level of Proficiency' , a 'Comin of Age' kinda thang, when I was growin up. etc. an all such kinda truck.

            Ain't thang one wrong with no grill marks, to start off with.
            Especial if yer wantin it, presentaion-wise.
            I do it when I want x, y, or, z result/presentation. Unapologiticelly.
            Last edited by Mr. Bones; April 17, 2020, 09:35 AM.

          • Mr. Bones
            Mr. Bones commented
            Editing a comment
            That bein said, most th time, probly in excess o 89.5%, statitsically, I go fer th Full Maillard Sear.
            Much More Flavours, per sq.in., ime.
            Last edited by Mr. Bones; April 16, 2020, 11:52 PM.

          #14
          I recently got a Weber Spirit II, and the grill grates. U am wondering, when cooking indirect, is it better to have the griddle/flat side down, to prevent as much conduction heat/searing, and is it better to have the ridges up so less contact with food, so it does not heat up as quickly? I know it is a matter of taste, and I am still getting used to gas/grill grates, but In general sausages, burgers, chicken has worked better on the flat side, leaving me wondering, why/when I would want the ridged side. I hear from you all it is good for fish....but like I said, maybe the time for the ridges is indirect cooking? Thanks!

          Comment


          • JCGrill
            JCGrill commented
            Editing a comment
            My opinion on indirect is less contact is better. If you are smoking, regular grates are going to allow smoke to circulate better.

          • Polarbear777
            Polarbear777 commented
            Editing a comment
            Agreed Flat side for hot grilling and searing, ridge side for smoking and some exceptions (like corn on the cob so it doesn't roll).

          • jfmorris
            jfmorris commented
            Editing a comment
            I find skin on chicken works better (for me) on the railed side, and the rails work well for fish, other items where I can use the "grate tool" to flip things. I only use the flat for smash burgers and searing steaks. Since I have a full replacement set, to do indirect, I just disconnect the panels in the middle, and have one side of the grill on, one off, using rails on the indirect side, for reverse searing a steak for example, with the heat on under the flat up end for searing at the end.

          #15
          I have my grillgrates turned upside down for uniform sear.
          That's how I like it for steaks.
          Will have pics Sunday.

          I use standard grates for indirect side of grill

          Comment

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