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Options for thick pork chops

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    Options for thick pork chops

    Hey folks, I got this pair of so-called thick New York pork chops from Wild Fork that I'm going to make soon. They're a bit over 1.5 in./almost 4cm thick, so I don't want to just grill them hot, but instead some form of reverse sear. Here they are:

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    I've got three methods available to get the IT to target before I sear to finish: Sous vide, 2-zone on the gas grill w/GrillGrates, or in the vertical p-smoker. The finish will be on the ripping hot GrillGrates regardless.

    Any of these got an obvious advantage? This is a bit leaner cut, so is sous vide the best bet to retain moisture? Happy to hear any input.

    #2
    I like to Sous Vide 140 for a couple hours. Chill. Cook indirect to 130 and sear HOT.

    Edit- score the outer fat cap
    Last edited by Jerod Broussard; January 23, 2022, 07:38 PM.

    Comment


    • theroc
      theroc commented
      Editing a comment
      +1

    • Old Glory
      Old Glory commented
      Editing a comment
      I still don't get the need to chill then reheat if you are eating right away.

    • klflowers
      klflowers commented
      Editing a comment
      +2

    #3
    I don't think they need both SV and indirect reverse sear. I'd brine, then either reverse sear to 140 or SV. Let cool, then sear. I like something like Montreal Steak seasoning for the sear.

    @Jerod Broussard - why would you SV and indirect? Am I missing some advantage there?

    Comment


    • Jerod Broussard
      Jerod Broussard commented
      Editing a comment
      I chilled down. I like to bring back up slowly and sear.

    • Rob whatever
      Rob whatever commented
      Editing a comment
      Plus one on the brining. This lean meat needs it. It’s more important than the rub or the method chosen to cook them.

      Rob

    #4
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    I like to just grill 'em hot.

    Comment


    • Hulagn1971
      Hulagn1971 commented
      Editing a comment
      Showoff ;D

    #5
    I get those all the time from Wild Fork. In fact I did a pair just last week. I like to dry brine them overnight usually with a commercial pork rub of some sort. Plenty of salt in the rubs usually for an effective brine. Then I like to smoke them low and slow with the cooker temp at 235 until an IT of 145. I use my pellet cooker. About 90 minutes or so. Then rest for about 10-15 minutes and serve. Always very tender, juicy, and delish.
    Last edited by Jfrosty27; January 23, 2022, 08:17 PM.

    Comment


      #6
      We did a small variation on this tonight, and it was terrific. Did the brine, but did a garlic dry rub with a bit of Dijon mustard for the cook itself. Grilled slow at about 225 on the gasser for an hour to get to 135, had a smoke pack on the heat just for kicks.

      again, was terrific.

      Ensure moist and flavorful pork chops every time with this recipe for brined and smoked chops. While the lack of fat can often result in dry pork chops, a simple brine will keep them extra juicy. They are then smoked and seared on the grill for a deep smoky flavor before being finished with a tangy mustard bbq sauce.

      Comment


        #7
        Brine, smoke and sear Vinegar Hill house style.

        Comment


          #8
          I wet brine with 6% salt water solution for 4-24 hours. Then I fire up the grill for 250-275. I season with MMD. I cook slow to an internal of 130. Then I paint with a mustard based sauce and sear like I would a NY strip. Serve with fried potatoes

          Comment


            #9
            Hey thanks folks! When the chops aren't this thick, our usual recipe is to marinade the chops in a mixture of honey, dijon, and red wine vinegar for a couple of hours and then grill. So the mustard components suggested make some sense. Sounds like any of my options should work just fine.

            Comment


              #10
              For a change of pace, you might want to try a recipe ecowper posted for harissa marinated pork chops. https://pitmaster.amazingribs.com/fo...rissa-marinade

              Comment


                #11
                If you go the SV route, try at 135° so that when you sear them you end up in the neighborhood of 140°. Juicy every time.

                Kathryn

                Comment


                • smokenoob
                  smokenoob commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I just put one in the bath, those the numbers I chose also!

                • Hulagn1971
                  Hulagn1971 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Excellent advice.

                • Polarbear777
                  Polarbear777 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Always 132-135 for mine in the SV. Gives you more margin to with with on the finishing sear.

                #12
                I'll be the odd guy out here. While most of the pre-seasoning/marinading suggested is fine (maybe even necessary) for commodity pork, these are Berkshire and the one's I've had deserved to be simply seasoned to let the inherent pork flavor shine through.

                To my tastes the window of desirable doneness for pork is very narrow temp wise. A few degrees over and pork loses it's moist, tender texture quickly, especially as it cools. For that reason I don't reverse sear these because it's too tempting to get that just right, gorgeous sear and potentially overshoot if I guessed wrong on the beginning cook temp. I hit them with the sear first, then go indirect to get to the high 130s and let carryover finish it.

                Comment


                • Attjack
                  Attjack commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I agree and that's what I do with the chops from my sister's farm.

                #13
                Some great advice from previous posters!!! My thing for these and thick beef steaks is to do a front sear to build that crust then indirect low and slow with a little smoke. I seem to be able to hit my exact doneness with this method without going over like I have a tendency to do with the reverse sear method. In either case IMO i wouldn't go any higher than 145 as my final IT.....I like to pull at 135-137 let rest for 10-15 min before serving if I can wait that long...HA!

                Comment


                  #14
                  Click image for larger version

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                  This is my pork chop turn box from last November’s KCBS contest. These are Berkshire chops. I dry brined with salt only, rubbed with a Dalmatian rub, then slow smoked to 120. Put in a cast iron pan to sear them off. Heat source was right on top the fire box. I kept the tenderloin part for me, sliced the rest for samples.

                  Comment


                  • bbqLuv
                    bbqLuv commented
                    Editing a comment
                    First Place in the Money, I bet it tastes as good as it looks.

                  • DaveD
                    DaveD commented
                    Editing a comment
                    That looks amazing!

                  #15
                  Every once in a while, I post a recipe that I’ve received exactly zero requests for, and this gorgeous Mongolian pork chop is the most re...


                  Do this. Absolutely delicious. You won’t regret it.

                  Comment

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