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Sous Vide Tri Tip

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  • chudzikb
    replied
    So, put the dreadful quality Aldi tri tip in for 20+ hours at 131 degrees. Really made it better than 10 hours. At 10, it was seriously tough. 20 made it edible, not as good as better quality tri tips, but, workable. Will be good in sandwiches day 2.

    Leave a comment:


  • Huskee
    commented on 's reply
    Wow.

  • Troutman
    commented on 's reply
    BFlynn go to Costco, buy a tri-tip, stick it in a water bath at 131 for 4 hours, sear it on your big green whatever, carve, tell the family its time to eat, then stuff your mouth. Oh yea make a board sauce to go along with it

  • BFlynn
    commented on 's reply
    I keep clicking the picture to place my order, but nothing happens!

    How do I get this tasty tri tip to my mouf....

  • Troutman
    replied
    PKB is spot on, it's time for tenderness. I remember when I first got into sous vide about 3 years ago I got the bright idea that inside skirt steak, as tough as it can be, would come out tender as a baby's bottom if I just left it in there for like 12 hours. What I ended up with was ground up mess that I literally poured the out of the bag and into the garbage, it had totally disintegrated.

    On big cuts like tri-tip, I tend to keep it well under 3-4 hours and that's all the tender I want. Sweet spot on tougher cuts like chuck, 18-22 hours depending on the size. I guess you really need to experiment and see what works best for you and the degree of doneness you prefer.

    As to resting, or even shocking before the sear, forget it. Unless you are cooking it the next day all you are doing is letting the meat settle down by resting or shocking only to have to ramp it back up again. Some say it helps keep the meat from over shooting but I've found that it ends up giving me more of that tell tale grey banding instead. But again, each to his own.

    Here's a SVQ tri-tip I recently did as described. Came out good.

    Click image for larger version

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  • Potkettleblack
    replied
    There are two schools of thought on what the desired end result is. One school is that tri-tip should have some chew and some want it as tender as ribeye or filet. Some folks think of it as a steak, others as a roast, I think that's where the difference in opinion comes from.

    If you want that ribeye/filet tenderness, you go long, like 12-24 hours. Temp at whatever you want, 129-135.
    If you think tritip should have some texture to it, then you go for minimum for cooking through at the temp you want, per the Baldwin chart and the thickness at the center of the thing. If it's sitting on the counter, you want the height at the vertex of the thing. Or somewhere close to that, if one end of the thing is a bit thicker.

    I don't do a lot of tri tip as they don't really cut a lot of sirloin for tri tip here in Chicago. I like it more chewy, so maybe like 3 hours @131, shock, sear on the flat grill grates.

    As always, the pinch test is your friend. How it pinches will be roughly how it chews.

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  • Potkettleblack
    commented on 's reply
    Time is tenderness, temp is doneness. That's the full saying.

  • chudzikb
    replied
    It truly depends upon the quality of the meat. Lesser time with better meat. Get a piece from ALDI, and 10 hours was not nearly enough. I would not hesitate to do 15 just to get some tenderness, it was a beast of a piece of meat.

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  • Skip
    replied
    I usually SV at 134 for 10-12 hours then paint with avocado oil and sear. I haven't chilled. My Family prefers more medium than rare. A simple board sauce will push the cook over the top. I do believe that a 12-24 hour Dry Brine does make a noticeable difference IMO.
    Last edited by Skip; December 19, 2020, 06:56 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Oakgrovebacon
    replied
    I do 6 hrs at 131. Then sear. My wife prefers a more medium cooked beef so I sear to about 140 it. The two us cannot eat it all so the leftovers get chilled then shaved on the slicer for roast beef sammies or to the griddle for cheesesteak sammies.

    Leave a comment:


  • tbob4
    replied
    My buddy, who I consider to be the SV king, says 7 hrs and he goes directly to the grill. He has shocked but said it adds nothing to the cook. His kids agree with him.

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  • barelfly
    replied
    To quote Potkettleblack, time is tenderness - at least I think that’s what he always says. So, really the question is how tender do you want it? A few hours gives you about the same tenderness you could get from smoking, so you can go off of that. I usually stick with about 2 hours for a tri-tip then a sear. and I don’t cool, I just go straight from SV, season and sear and serve.

    Enjoy!

    Leave a comment:


  • Kblief
    replied
    Much appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Glory
    replied
    I use a Joule and cook it at 129 for 90-120 minutes for non-frozen. Quick sear on cast iron or over charcoal and it is fantastic. Be sure to cut across the grain.

    I do not cool unless I am eating it later.

    Leave a comment:


  • mgaretz
    replied
    I do mine for about 8 hours (usually from frozen). No need to cool first unless you are not eating right away or you have a very weak searing setup.

    Leave a comment:

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