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Pulled Pork Test #87 AKA Foil Vs. Butcher Paper This Weekend

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  • Jerod Broussard
    commented on 's reply
    My wife asked if she could use my butcher paper to cut out clothes patterns. My response was, "Pleeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaase, that thing weighs 800 pounds!!"

  • _John_
    replied
    So my pork butts were wrapped together in the cryovac and I separated them today for dry brining. Usually I just have fat trimming to do, and every so often there are little slivers of bone in silverskin on top. Today's butt #1 was just like this, probably about 9 pounds (I assumed they were both about 7) but the other looked butchered by Ray Charles. Pieces hanging off everywhere, they cut about 2 inches too much off of one side the whole way down. Since they are awkwardly sized, I think I am going to just do foil vs paper.
    Then the decision was which butt gets what treatment and I made an executive decision that since I have done like 75 of them foiled in the last 12 months, I have a pretty good idea what they are like and will know if the smaller one is like those. This will give a bit of a skewed test, but at the end of the day it is a test to find out if I should change the way I do things, so giving the paper wrapped butt the best butt gives me the best chance to do that.

    Oh and I hope I like it, only butcher paper I could find was a thousand foot roll.

    Leave a comment:


  • FLBuckeye
    commented on 's reply
    I am going to start injecting, just to prepare for comps

  • David Parrish
    commented on 's reply
    Breadhead that was me. I've found ramping the heat up to around 275F while the meat goes from 150F to 175F speeds up the cook without too much impact to the final result. In a perfect world I cook at 225F for 17 hours. But how often are things perfect?

  • Jerod Broussard
    commented on 's reply
    PHOTB, Plenty Hanging Off The Back

  • FLBuckeye
    commented on 's reply
    The ones I wrap in foil come out super moist

  • Breadhead
    commented on 's reply
    _John_. The last thing that really got me to change my technique when BBQing large hunks of meat was a month or 2 ago. I think it was either David Parrish or Huskee that said you can power through the stall with a higher temperature if you don't want to wrap. That hit home and changed my game. It gave me a more desirable option.

    I haven't needed to use it yet but I'm pleased its in my arsenal of options.

  • _John_
    commented on 's reply
    Mine are always a bit drier, which isn't a surprise really. I think I will like butcher paper because it lets out some moisture, even without injecting, and wrapping as tightly as possible, I can still hear the liquid boiling in the foil when I take it off. Foil is quite literally boiling and steaming it.

  • _John_
    commented on 's reply
    Breadhead We are in agreement, but until I saw someone doing a 321 with ribs it never occurred to me to wrap them, I tried it and like unwrapped better. This is just an in writing opportunity for me to test out and see if another method works better, and hopefully get others to try it if it is better and not waste the money if it isn't. What would you see that would make you say, Man I need to try it that way?

  • Breadhead
    commented on 's reply
    _John_. The great part of BBQing is that you're the Chef and like Meathead says, there ain't no rules. I like to keep notes on any new cook where I try new techniques, temps, rubs or wrapping.

    My main goal is to use all of my past cooks to create food that tastes extraordinary. My goal with pork butts is a moist interior, a tasty rub applied with just the right quantity and a beautiful tasty bark. A good bark adds to the taste and texture... IMHO.

    I admire your desire to try everything to develop the flavor you, your family and your friends prefer. That's what makes cooking, BBQing and grilling so much fun.

    The only difference between an 8 hour cook and a 16 hour cook is planning. There is no, zero, zilch extra labor. Fortunately I have about $500 worth of temp controllers and temp thermometers that control and track my cook for me. I feel very comfortable going to bed during long low and slow cooks or going away for a two hour breakfast with friends while I'm BBQing big hunks of meat.

    We ALL have different techniques and methods and I encourage everyone to do it their way.
    Last edited by Breadhead; June 25, 2015, 02:26 PM.

  • Breadhead
    commented on 's reply
    FLBuckeye. Hmmm... I learned long ago "it's not what you say but how you say it" that makes your opinion palatable with those that you disagree with.😎

  • FLBuckeye
    replied
    I didn't wrap for the first time ever this past weekend. Results were dry for some reason. I had the pink butchers paper I just received; I should have wrapped the butts in foil and paper to compare. Oh well...next time

    Leave a comment:


  • FLBuckeye
    commented on 's reply
    Breadhead Your buddy mucho over at Stella strongly disagrees with you. And he dissed Meathead too. I decided to stay out of the discussion because I just joined and don't want to get banned. You showed admirable restraint.

  • _John_
    replied
    Breadhead

    I have no traditionalist views so I don't mind injecting anything, though when wrapping I don't really think there would be a difference anyway.

    I wrap 8 out of 10 times. Almost everyone wraps at some point, it's just whether you do it during the cook or after to rest it, though they both have the same essential purpose. Everyone who has tried both of mine, which is all of my family and friends, prefer the wrapped (doesn't mean you or yours will, just like a pure salt and pepper brisket wouldn't go here). I do wish I could have a slightly crispier crust, which I may figure out, but a full cook with no wrap is too much.

    As far as simplicity, wrapping in foil a few hours early isn't a challenge for me, certainly less work than those buns i'll be serving this on!

    So the test is about wrapping specifically, which you don't do, but if I do a non-wrapped version is there a test you propose to objectively compare the two, or is it simply if wrapped bark isn't the same as unwrapped it fails? As in the Franklin video I fully expect to find differences in all 3 or what would be the point. Taste is always subjective, so what metrics/measures/attributes could I describe to compare them?

    A thought for the fourth was spritzing maybe?

    Leave a comment:


  • Breadhead
    replied
    I never inject butts.

    I never wrap unless I failed to plan properly or fail to control my cooking temp.

    I test the bark, moisture and taste.

    I keep it simple.

    Leave a comment:

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