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Stacked Pork Steaks

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    Stacked Pork Steaks

    I believe I have done reasonable due diligence on this subject. I have looked for this recipe that I saw on some or other food TV show (I think) here, googled it, and posted it a couple times on BBQ Facebook page(s) all to no avail. So here goes…a whole pork shoulder is cut into pork steaks I think they were around inch thick, but no thinner. The steaks were prepped on both sides, like a slab of ribs or a whole shoulder using whatever you like to set rub (I use mustard or Butcher BBQ Grilling Oil) and then rubbed. They were then stacked and cooked at typical 225* or so temp. After some period of time, it was at least an hour, the top steak was moved to the bottom and the process repeated until the original bottom steak was on the top. Then they were sauced and finished, with results promised to be more tender than other methods. Does this ring any bells??? I’d like to track down where I saw but can’t so far.


    #2
    Why stack them, what does that achieve? It creates a mass that slows cooking and doesn’t allow enough area for bark formation. Pork steaks are one of my favorites, just cook them like pork ribs individually and enjoy a great cut!

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      #3
      I don't like pork steaks or any pork meat but I would say this seems to be a good recipe.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Troutman View Post
        Why stack them, what does that achieve? It creates a mass that slows cooking and doesn’t allow enough area for bark formation. Pork steaks are one of my favorites, just cook them like pork ribs individually and enjoy a great cut!
        Slow is the main point of the stack. Bark formation should be ok (unless you want black burned carbon like bark) since much more of the shoulder is "exposed" as each side of each steak has its time. Obvious point being they'd be cooked about as long as a whole shoulder so they would be more tender than cooked...well like steaks. I think it makes sense but can't find anyone else that has heard of or seen this method.

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          #5
          i feel like all that moving will rub off a lot of seasoning over the period of time.

          i don't know why it wouldn't work to cook it, but as far as effort vs reward you might not get a big of a bang for your buck. maybe smoke them separated and then when the bark is good enough for you wrap them up.

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          • Yelnoc
            Yelnoc commented
            Editing a comment
            It goes without saying that you would reapply rub when you moved bottom to top and that the rub on the inner layers would not rub off. The idea is to end up with something very tender (cook time would be in the range of 8 hours) which in my experience is not otherwise achieved and then to finish like a traditional pork steak with more rub and sauce, not to end up with the type of bark you'd get cooking a whole shoulder.

          • DeusDingo
            DeusDingo commented
            Editing a comment
            yeah, i get it, it just seems like a lot of work for something you could just roast the pork in a whole shoulder until it's ~180, slice, season, and finish. seems like a lot of work for not much payoff but hey, if it's the best thing you've ever had then more power to you. i'm likely wrong so best of luck to you

          #6
          I don't do pork steaks, don't plan on starting. I was just trying to track down the recipe. I think it is an interesting concept.

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            #7
            If the pork was pulled in the end, wouldn't this be a way to get seasoning into the middle of the roast? I'm thinking this is what it is all about - move seasoning and smoke to the inside (and out).

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              #8
              Never heard of it but I like it.

              Comment


                #9
                Here are two Pork Tower videos, one on a smoker, one in an oven. The method is as you describe, except that they don't swap layers during cooking. But the prep is as you described it, FWIW.





                Maybe, if you haven't already done so, you want to google Pork Party Tower to find the method exactly as you describe? Just a thought...

                Kathryn
                Last edited by fzxdoc; April 1, 2021, 07:06 AM.

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