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    Greens???

    I'm going to do some greens with my butt smoke this week.

    Onion
    Garlic
    Pork fat and the trimmings from the butt
    Chicken stock
    Vinegar

    I know there are lots of ways to do greens.


    I'd love to hear what you do. Mine just seem a bit boring.

    #2
    Bacon and hot sauce? (though your pork certainly gets that bacon effect?) Last year I got a bumper crop in the garden and this was the recipe I tried first. I backed off on the brown sugar eventually. Not a big sweet fan. http://www.pbs.org/food/fresh-tastes...ollard-greens/
    Last edited by Steve Navarre; November 17, 2014, 07:50 PM.

    Comment


      #3
      I'm like Pit Boss, my greens are usually either asparagus or Brussels sprouts. Or broccoli. Do you mean smoking them or just having as a side?

      Comment


      • Jon Solberg
        Jon Solberg commented
        Editing a comment
        Side. I tend to do them in the fall instead of slaw.

      • HC in SC
        HC in SC commented
        Editing a comment
        I am thinking we have some 'lost in translation' on the word 'greens'.

        'Greens' in the South only mean one type of leafy green vegetable, usually collard greens.

        Some like turnip greens, mustard greens or a mix.

        Kinda like the location driven vernacular on the word "barbeque".

        In the North and West it is a verb meaning to cook something on a grill or pit or a type of outdoor party; in the South - especially SC and NC, the word 'barbeque' is strictly used as a noun and only means one thing: pit cooked pork. Could be a shoulder, could be whole hog - again; depends on the specific location.

      #4
      So I think you are pretty close there Jon. I use fresh collards only - fresh turnip greens can be used in a pinch.

      I add water, good applewood smoked bacon, beer, sugar, vinegar, pepper sauce, minced garlic salt and pepper -- for better or worse I usually just eyeball it and then adjust as they cook down.

      Remember - collards reduce like a mofo. You can have a huge pot jam packed with fresh chopped collards and after 15 mins of heat you might have 3/8 of a pot full. I usually keep adding fresh and reducing over and over until I get the desired amount of cooked greens.

      Always serve with pepper sauce (not hot sauce, but pepper sauce - the kind with the little peppers in the bottle filled with white vinegar. Texas Pete makes a decent one that should be readily available).

      My recipe is a copy from the place where I have had the best collards in my life - the Restaurant at Middleton Place:
      https://www.middletonplace.org/restaurant.html

      Cheers and enjoy!!
      Last edited by HC in SC; November 18, 2014, 08:58 AM.

      Comment


      • Beefchop
        Beefchop commented
        Editing a comment
        That's what I was thinking - greens to me mean collards, mustard, or turnip greens cooked down with some salt, bacon, a hunk of pork bone and those spices kept secret by families for generations!

        Great recipe HC.

      #5
      Thanks.

      I wasn't playing coy with a secret recipe or just pulling it out of my butt - I really do just eyeball the the ingredients. The wife has been asking me to write the recipe down, but since it changes as it cooks down and it is hard to measure a precise amount of chopped greens that you will get out of a bunch.

      I'll give my best guess at the starting point so at least there is a semblance of a foundation:

      1 bunch collards chopped
      6 cups water
      6-8 slices applewood smoked bacon diced in large pieces
      12 oz beer - whatever you got on hand
      5 tablespoons sugar
      1/4 cup white vinegar
      3 tablespoons pepper sauce
      5 cloves minced or chopped fresh garlic
      1 tablespoon salt
      1 tablespoon black pepper
      1 large yellow onion chopped or diced (forgot the fresh onion in the 30,000 foot view recipe above)
      2 tablespoons real butter (also forgot from previous post)

      Add chopped greens and onions to large pot. Probably the largest you have.
      Add water and all other ingredients and bring to a low boil.
      Keep stirring and adding greens into pot as they reduce when wilting.

      Once all greens are in pot and you can get a lid on reduce temp to low/simmer.
      Keep stirring every 5-7 mins for at least 30 mins adding more water if / as required.
      Do not let liquid run dry! If you do and they burn in the slightest, throw them out - there is no getting rid of the burnt bitter taste.
      The longer you let them simmer at low heat, the better.
      Each time you stir taste the pot likker and make adjustments per your preference.
      Serve with pepper sauce as a condiment.

      Leftovers are freezable in Ziploc bags, just make sure they are covered with likker and all excess air is removed. The longer you freeze them the more they will have the consistency of canned greens, but the flavor will still be there.

      Hope this helps!
      Last edited by HC in SC; November 18, 2014, 03:31 PM.

      Comment


        #6
        HC Thank you. I'll be doing some up tomorrow and let you all know how it goes.

        Comment


          #7
          Originally posted by HC in SC View Post
          Thanks.

          I wasn't playing coy with a secret recipe or just pulling it out of my butt - I really do just eyeball the the ingredients. The wife has been asking me to write the recipe down, but since it changes as it cooks down and it is hard to measure a precise amount of chopped greens that you will get out of a bunch.

          I'll give my best guess at the starting point so at least there is a semblance of a foundation:

          1 bunch collards chopped
          6 cups water
          6-8 slices applewood smoked bacon diced in large pieces
          12 oz beer - whatever you got on hand
          5 tablespoons sugar
          1/4 cup white vinegar
          3 tablespoons pepper sauce
          5 cloves minced or chopped fresh garlic
          1 tablespoon salt
          1 tablespoon black pepper
          1 large yellow onion chopped or diced (forgot the fresh onion in the 30,000 foot view recipe above)
          2 tablespoons real butter (also forgot from previous post)

          Add chopped greens and onions to large pot. Probably the largest you have.
          Add water and all other ingredients and bring to a low boil.
          Keep stirring and adding greens into pot as they reduce when wilting.

          Once all greens are in pot and you can get a lid on reduce temp to low/simmer.
          Keep stirring every 5-7 mins for at least 30 mins adding more water if / as required.
          Do not let liquid run dry! If you do and they burn in the slightest, throw them out - there is no getting rid of the burnt bitter taste.
          The longer you let them simmer at low heat, the better.
          Each time you stir taste the pot likker and make adjustments per your preference.
          Serve with pepper sauce as a condiment.

          Leftovers are freezable in Ziploc bags, just make sure they are covered with likker and all excess air is removed. The longer you freeze them the more they will have the consistency of canned greens, but the flavor will still be there.

          Hope this helps!
          Looks great!

          Comment


            #8
            For years living in Charleston, SC I learned to cook "Greens" (collards) similar to HC. Now I have been sauteing them in a pan with a little oil, butter, salt/pepper to taste, onion and garlic. Maybe some other seasoning like oregano, or whatever your palate likes. It only takes about 15-20 min. I have done this also with Kale and we were going to try Swiss Chard but the DW put it in a soup she made yesterday. I will have top go to the farm and see if there is any left in the field to get.

            Comment


            • barney
              barney commented
              Editing a comment
              Wife & I love swiss chard.

            #9
            I see Huskee has grilled Brussels sprouts. Do you are others have tips on Brussels sprouts in the smoker?

            Comment


            • Huskee
              Huskee commented
              Editing a comment
              Done it once. I didn't care for it as well as non-smoke roasting of them, but that's purely subjective. But do it HOT, light olive oil and salt on them, very light lemon juice really makes them pop flavorwise. In the oven I do them at 425 I think, maybe 450 not entirely sure (actually wife does them) until the leaves get a little black to them.

            #10
            Thanks, maybe I will try smoking them a little then throw them in the oven.

            Comment

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