Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A case for confit and BBQ

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Potkettleblack
    commented on 's reply
    I've used their process and it's not quite the same thing... but it's very good as it's own thing, to be sure.

  • Strat50
    commented on 's reply
    You see, I discovered this by accident. I had made chicken leg confit and needed to Sear the outside, and warm up the innards, so to speak. So, I thought, why not sear in the kamado? I tried it and immediately loved it. The oily surface picked up the smoke, and the excess fat dripped away. The meat was already well seasoned. It was so freakin' good! After that, I started experimenting..

  • rickgregory
    commented on 's reply
    You don't need a lot for a couple of legs... a tablespoon or so. Usually duck has enough fat on it but if you get some with less skin/fat, add a little. Same if you do chicken since most chicken doesn't have enough fat.

  • Dr. Pepper
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks for the tip rickgregory I've got some duck fat in the freezer (from roasting Bohemian style whole ducks), and I can put some of that in the bags as well, since I can later recycle the fat.

  • rickgregory
    commented on 's reply
    Yep, this works (I've tried it) BUT... make sure there's reasonable fat on the legs. If they're trimmed down etc you might not have enough fat to really confit it, though of course it will cook.

  • Huskee
    commented on 's reply
    I'm with you on the tallow thing. Not to discredit them or their new process, but video creators need new things to get/keep interest in their videos. I've analyzed this with my thinking cap and I don't see practical benefit to outweigh the hassle. I'm open to be proven wrong as well but it won't affect my non-desire to do it.

  • Troutman
    replied
    I'm amazed none of my Mexican cooking fellows didn't mention Carnitas as another example of cooking in fat (in that case lard to be most correct). It's indeed a classic way to prepare proteins of all sorts. As mentioned it really is akin to SV in that the meat is bathed in a liquid that stays at a relatively constant temperature.

    YouTube guys Jeramy Yoder and Harry Soo are on a tallow injection and exterior application kick. Although not a confit application, it sounds like your results may have been similar. I'm really not that adventurous and don't see how that would improve a Prime or for sure a Wagyu grade brisket. But I'm open to be proven wrong!!

    Hope 2021 (what's left of it) finds you in better stead there chef. We look forward to more posts and ideas. Later.

    Leave a comment:


  • SierraBBQGuy
    replied
    I’ve been dreaming about doing another bbq competition, if this Pandemic ever allows. I usually enter the Silicon Valley Comp. In doing some poking around, I came across this, same technique as described here. I’m thinking to adapt this at next event.

    https://www.texasmonthly.com/food/re...hicken-thighs/

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Pepper
    replied
    And, according to Kenji and Daniel Gritzer (Serious Eats), in a sous-vide bag the duck will produce it's own rendered duck fat as it bathes, which not only provides rendered fat for that cook, but is recoverable as well for other uses (potatoes, veggies.) I have ordered 40 lbs (yikes! But it's 8 5 lb frozen packages) of duck 'drumettes' from Marx Foods, and will try SV per their recipe.

    https://www.marxfoods.com/pekin-duck-drumettes



    Leave a comment:


  • rickgregory
    commented on 's reply
    PS: Confiting a duck, say, in veggie oil won't give you quite the luxury of doing it in its own fat. Still works, but some of the duckiness is absorbed into the oil. IF you're doing this you ideally want to use the same fat as the animal your confiting. So for a brisket, I'd save the trimmings in a freezer back and render them for later use once you have a bunch. But it's a relatively minor upgrade for the OP (lots of other flavor and veggie oil still gives you the richness)
    Last edited by rickgregory; September 9, 2021, 10:19 AM.

  • Strat50
    commented on 's reply
    You can use any "short" fat, not just duck, of course. Lard, bacon grease, vegetable shortening,etc. When you season the fat, like sprigs of herbs, peppercorns, etc., it really infuses the flavors into the meat. This takes volume, as a thinner layer of fat is dealing with surface temps and the meat too. A larger volume of fat provides greater thermal mass, which really helps here.

  • Potkettleblack
    commented on 's reply
    The main advantage to the SV process here is that duck fat can be pricey... Using 2 TBS instead of enough to poach the whole legs in can be much more economical.

    But I do agree, it's idiot proof with a decent oven. I have a giant pizza steel in the oven to help regulate the temp. The extra thermal mass reduces the swing.

  • Strat50
    commented on 's reply
    It would be good that way, but regular confit is very forgiving, and easy to adjust as the cook progresses. You only need an oven that is precise enough to hold that 200-225 temp. It's pretty idiot proof.

  • Strat50
    commented on 's reply
    I went back to work at my old job, 2-3 hours a day to start, using a walker...lol Then crutches, then a cane, now I'm cleared for full contact cooking. Thanks so much for the sentiment, as it does mean a lot. Peace and blessings to you and yours..

  • Strat50
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks very much. So far, so good.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
Working...
X
false
0
Guest
500
["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
false
false
{"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
Yes
Rubs Promo

Spotlight

These are not ads or paid placements. These are some of our favorite tools and toys.

These are products we have tested, won our top awards, and are highly recommend. Click here to read how we test, about our medals, and what they mean.

Use Our Links To Help Keep Us Alive

A big part of this site is our unbiased equipment and product reviews. We love playing with toys and we have no problem calling them the way we see them. Some companies pay a finder’s fee if a reader clicks a link on AmazingRibs.com and buys a product. It has zero impact on our reviews, zero impact on the price you pay, and the sites never tell us what you bought, but it has a major impact on our ability to keep this site alive! So before you buy, please click our links. Here’s a link that takes you to a page on Amazon that has some of our favorite tools and toys: https://tinyurl.com/amazingribs


The Pit Barrel Cooker May Be Too Easy


The PBC has a rabid cult following for good reason. It is absolutely positively without a doubt the best bargain on a smoker in the world. Period. This baby will cook circles around the cheap offset sideways barrel smokers because temperature control is so much easier.

Click here to read our detailed review and the raves from people who own them


Blackstone Rangetop Combo: Griddle And Deep Fryer In One


The flat top does the burgers and the fryer does the fries. Use the griddle for bacon, eggs, grilled cheese, and so much more. And why deep fry indoors when you can avoid the smell and mess by doing it outside!

Click here to read our detailed review and to order


Finally, A Great Portable Pellet Smoker


Green Mountain’s portable Davy Crockett Pellet Smoker is one mean tailgating and picnic machine. But it’s also gaining popularity with people who want to add a small, set it and forget it pellet smoker to their backyard arsenal. And with their WiFi capabilities you can control and monitor Davy Crocket from your smart phone or laptop.

Click here to read our detailed review and to order


Groundbreaking Hybrid Thermometer!

Thermapen One Instant Read Thermometer

The FireBoard Spark is a hybrid combining instant-read capability, a cabled temperature probe, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity. We gave Spark a Platinum Medal for pushing the envelope of product capability while maintaining high standards of design and workmanship.

Click here to read our comprehensive Platinum Medal review

 

Comprehensive Temperature Magnet With 80+ Important Temps

Amazingribs.com temperature magnet
Winner of the National BBQ Association’s product of the year award. This 8.5″ x 11″ magnet contains more that 80 benchmark temperatures for meats (both USDA recommended temps as well as the temps chefs recommend), fats and oils, sugars, sous vide, eggs, collagens, wood combustion, breads, and more. Although it is not certified as all-weather, we have tested it outdoors in Chicago weather and it has not delaminated in three years, but there is minor fading.

Click here to order.


Grilla Pellet Smoker proves good things come in small packages

We always liked Grilla. The small 31.5″ x 29.5″ footprint makes it ideal for use where BBQ space is limited, as on a condo patio.
Click here for our review on this unique smoker


Is This Superb Charcoal Grill A Kamado Killer?


The PK-360, with 360 square inches of cooking space, this rust free, cast aluminum charcoal grill is durable and easy to use. Four-way venting means it’s easy to set up for two zone cooking with more control than single vent Kamado grills. It is beautifully designed, completely portable, and much easier to set up for 2-zone cooking than any round kamado.

Click here to read our detailed review of the PK 360

Click here to order directly and get an exclusive AmazingRibs.com deal