Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Newbie Brisket Question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Spinaker
    replied
    Keep in mind that a grass fed steer will be leaner than a corn fed one. So they do tend to dry out easier when cooking.

    For the bark, I like to let the brisket go until I have the color I like. That is usually around 185 F or so. Then I will wrap. If I am using Wagyu or a good prime grade brisket, I will let it go all the way, without wrapping at all.

    I also tend to spritz the brisket for the first 3 hours or so. Mostly because I don't run water pans in my smokers. The spritz helps to keep those corners from drying out too fast. It also allows for more smoke adhesion. I use Champagne Vinegar, Apple Cider Vinegar, Liquid Aminos and water for my mixture. (Equal parts)

    Holding the brisket in a faux cambro is a huge part of the cooking process. I like to shoot for at least 2 hours for the rest and up too 4 hours. The longer the better. This will make a big difference in tenderness and moisture retention.

    Last thing, I also make sure to not slice the meat until I am ready to serve it. Once you slice it, it will start to dry out.

    Leave a comment:


  • kidbwapo
    replied
    The second cook was with a very high grade brisket. Organic, grass fed, no hormones or antibiotics. I think that helped enormously. Have ordered another Brisket from them to try again.

    Take the point y'all made on letting the beef cook a little longer before the wrap. Will have a go at that on the next cook.
    Thanks
    KB

    Leave a comment:


  • mountainsmoker
    replied
    Brisket being the animal it is depends a lot on the quality of the piece of meat you are cooking. I just looked up the UK grading system and your Good grade is the 4th grade down from the best. Normally we try to use the top 2 grades. I believe that was the problem with your 1st try. In the future try to use the best grade you can afford.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve R.
    commented on 's reply
    That does look like a heavy application of pepper (just the way I like it, though ) The only thing I would do differently is wait until the bark is fully formed before wrapping. I think this will also help your "peppery" issue, as the pepper mellows out a bit with the bark formation. You could also try using a more coarsely ground pepper.
    Last edited by Steve R.; June 3, 2020, 07:16 AM.

  • JP7794
    replied
    Brisket is one of the harder cuts to cook which makes it that much more satisfying when you get one right. If available, you are certainly ready for a whole brisket (packer) so you can experience the true love (lust if done right ) a brisket point can provide.

    Leave a comment:


  • kidbwapo
    replied
    Originally posted by fzxdoc View Post
    Nice brisket cook. You sure took a quantum leap up the learning curve on that one. Kudos to you.

    Like many, I never wrap a brisket until the bark sets, which is usually around 170-180°F. That helps preserve all that wonderful barkiness that we love on a brisket.

    Kathryn
    Hey thanks Kathryn. It turned out so good. Next time i'll try and leave it a little longer before putting the paper on.

    Leave a comment:


  • fzxdoc
    replied
    Nice brisket cook. You sure took a quantum leap up the learning curve on that one. Kudos to you.

    Like many, I never wrap a brisket until the bark sets, which is usually around 170-180°F. That helps preserve all that wonderful barkiness that we love on a brisket.

    Kathryn

    Leave a comment:


  • kidbwapo
    replied
    Hi
    Follow up to my last post. Had another go at Brisket and this one turned out really well. Some interesting points:
    • Meat from a different supplier. Flat brisket with much more fat that certainly helped.
    • Simple rub of salt/pepper/garlic powder in 60/40 split with half an ounce of garlic.
    • Hotter cook. Normally I'd cook at 250F but this time I cooked at 285 - 290F.
    • Removed the Brisket at when internally at 163F and wrapped in butcher paper before putting back. I think this made a HUGE difference to the end result.
    • Brisket stalled at 178F for 1 hour before it picked up again.
    • Removed it at 196F and let it rest for an hour.
    Final observations. Bark could've been a lot better but it was good for a second ever effort. Good smoke ring and the taste of the beef was phenomenally good. I was fighting the family off! I'll try this method again next time to see if it works again. One change I would make is reduce the pepper in the mix as it was overly peppery but that's a minor complaint.

    Thoughts fellow smokers?
    Thanks
    KB
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • fzxdoc
    replied
    Do keep us posted, kidbwapo , when you cook something else or another brisket.

    When my briskets "speed" through a stall, I take it to mean that I'm cooking a bit too hot for the cut of meat. That said, you had a really small and skinny brisket flat there, so it may just be how that particular brisket chose to ride through the cook.

    Kathryn

    Leave a comment:


  • kidbwapo
    replied
    Thanks again everyone. I'll let you know how the next cook goes!

    Leave a comment:


  • ofelles
    replied
    Welcome from the California Delta. Brisket can be stubborn and independent. Keep at it and you'll get the hang of it. Good advice so far.

    Leave a comment:


  • DeusDingo
    commented on 's reply
    i've had meat fly through the stall as well and it came out dry. i figured it means that there isn't enough material to create a stall which also means there isn't enough to keep it moist. that being said, dry brining is always a good idea especially for lean cuts like a brisket flat (or white meat chicken). also i would guess taking out at 88C was a little early unless it was prime grade equivalent.

  • FireMan
    replied
    Git yerself over to the interducin yerself page & interduce yerself! Welcome, eat good and have fun!

    Leave a comment:


  • kidbwapo
    replied
    Hey
    Thanks all, what a friendly bunch! Some additional clarification:
    • Good quality Flat brisket but I thought it looked too lean. I don't know if that makes a difference. Schwyy
    • A few inches thick, not pre-brined nor injected nor FC'd. It looked dry when checking it after 4hrs when it was sitting at 70C. fzxdoc
    Also, it flew through the stall which made me sit up and spill a brew. Literally like 20 mins which suggested to me it was already dry at that point? I'm trying again this weekend with a Point brisket to see how that works out. I was also thinking of wrapping in butchers paper? Sorry for the metrics, over the pond we work that way :-)
    Thanks
    KB

    Leave a comment:


  • Donw
    replied
    Welcome from Maryland.

    Leave a comment:

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
Working...
X
false
0
Guest
500
["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
false
false
{"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
Yes
Rubs Promo
Meat-Up in Memphis