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Darn, that's cold.

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  • FireMan
    replied
    You had me at “Big flames-Yes!

    Then ya went ahead whilst I was really excited & did it again, Big Flames-Yes. I then slumped in my chair exhausted. Yessir!

    Leave a comment:


  • HouseHomey
    replied
    Ya’all are Awesome. Don’t pay to much heed to the gray band. Tender and flavor is what you are wanting for yourself.

    Last edited by HouseHomey; May 13, 2020, 12:15 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • AZ Fogey
    commented on 's reply
    fzxdoc - Thanks, Kathryn. Sometimes obsession has an up side. LOL.

    Mike

  • fzxdoc
    replied
    That's beautiful, AZ Fogey . Keep on posting. You've certainly improved on the ThermoWorks method immensely. Thanks for doing all the work for us.

    Kathryn

    Leave a comment:


  • AZ Fogey
    replied
    This is the last time I'll post on this subject, I promise. This cook convinced me that starting with frozen steak is not only a viable technique, but is something that's really worth doing. I cooked a frozen 3/4 lb. piece of tri-tip tonight using exactly the method from post #5 above. This time I actually had fun doing it because I wasn't guessing anymore. 8 minutes of butter sear seems to be the magic number on my pit. After the sear, I put the steak on a plate, forced a meat probe into the still 29° center, and brushed some more butter on it and then seasoned it lightly with KosmosQ Dirty Bird Hot, and covered that lightly with Malcom Reed's Steak Rub. My finger brushed the steak as I was transferring it back to the 350° cold side of the pit, so of course, I licked my finger. I couldn't believe the incredible taste. I had some melted butter left and I shook a little bit of each of the rubs into bowl and mixed it up. It took about 20 minutes for the meat center to get to 50°, and then another 25 minutes to get to pull temp. I pulled the steak at 125° and put it on a plate I brushed it with the seasoned butter. Heaven. This was by far, the best tasting steak I've ever cooked, and I've cooked thousands. Sorry Montreal Steak, but I think you've been retired.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20200512_181234.jpg Views:	14 Size:	2.73 MB ID:	845248
    Last edited by AZ Fogey; May 13, 2020, 10:06 AM.

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  • IowaGirl
    commented on 's reply
    Ah ... good point about the GrillGrates performing differently than regular wire grates. I didn't think about that, but I shoulda. The different types of grates we're using will definitely make a difference.

  • AZ Fogey
    replied
    IowaGirl - Cooking with upside down Grill Grates is very similar to searing steak in a cast iron pan, only better. The heat is evenly distributed across the whole area of the steak, and, with the fat rendering, it was pretty near a perfect cook surface. I'm cooking on expanded metal grates over charcoal so the heat distribution is not quite as even (think grill marks). While this ribeye was a lot more fatty than the previous tri-tip, I would have to had to increase the sear time by quite a bit to get the same effect because there just weren't enough fat drippings to cause the flare-ups I needed. Besides which, your butcher is way better than mine. Mine is Sam's Club. Also, if you watch any of the steak competitions on YouTube, practically everyone uses Grill Grates, and they always move their steaks to a different area of the grate when they flip it because the meat has cooled off the grate immediately under it.

    Leave a comment:


  • IowaGirl
    commented on 's reply
    The sear I got was more like yours, AZ Fogey -- dark brown and crispy overall.

    I agree the Thermoworks steak wasn't seared as deeply as the steak in your pics. Their timing of 10-14 minutes total for the sear argues their heat source was a fair bit cooler than yours and mine.

    I didn't dip in butter and in retrospect I think I got a good outcome without dipping. After the first couple of flips, plenty of fat was rendering onto the GrillGrates. I love my butcher.

  • fzxdoc
    commented on 's reply
    Genius!

    K.

  • Steve B
    commented on 's reply
    Back Back Back in the USAaaaa.....
    I actually hate the beetles. But thought this was appropriate. 😁😬

  • AZ Fogey
    replied
    This is a follow-up to "Darn, it's cold." After reading IowaGirl 's and mnavarre ' s comments on cooking frozen steak and then thoroughly reading the Thermoworks article on the same subject, the whole thing was sitting in the back of my mind for a couple of days. I wasn't happy at all with sear I got on the tri-tip and the picture of the sear in the Thermoworks article didn't look very appetizing either. My thought was, that to sear frozen meat, you had to have the incredible heat of flare-up flames, and that a passive bed of charcoal just wouldn't do. I thought of using isopropyl alcohol or maybe a little gasoline, but figured butter would probably taste better. I knew butter would cause flare-up, so I hatched my plan.

    I removed the charcoal basket from the left firebox on my pit, poured in some Jealous Devil on top of once used Kamado Joe Big Block and used a propane torch to set a large area of it on fire. While the pit was heating up, I found a perfectly sized flat bowl that would fit the small steak I was going to cook, then I melted a quarter stick of butter in it. With the pit good and hot, I took the steak out of the freezer and set it in the bowl of butter - only the bottom side was buttered. I brought the charcoal grate up right underneath the grill grate and put the steak on. Big flames - YES! After a minute I dipped the steak into the butter again and put it back on the grate. Big flames again - YES!. After another minute, I turned the steak over and repeated the process, dipping the steak in butter every minute and cooking each side for two minutes for a total of 8 minutes until I was happy with the sear. Then I transferred the steak to the cooler side of the pit, seasoned it, and inserted a meat probe which read 70°. Then, it was just a matter of waiting til the steak got to 125° and pulling it.

    Here's how it came out.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20200510_174627.jpg Views:	0 Size:	2.70 MB ID:	844243

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20200510_174726.jpg Views:	0 Size:	2.80 MB ID:	844242

    Who needs sous vide, eh? But frankly, it was a hell of lot of work for a steak that barely gusted up to 1" thick, and would I use this technique if I were cooking more than maybe 2 steaks? Not a chance unless I had help at the pit. When you get bored doing reverse sear, give it a try, it's kind of fun and it would be spectacular if you had a really nice THICK steak.
    Last edited by AZ Fogey; May 10, 2020, 08:13 PM.

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  • fzxdoc
    commented on 's reply
    Welcome home, AZ Fogey .

    K.

  • AZ Fogey
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, we're back in the good ol' USofA, and I'm reveling in the availability of good beef. That was a long 6 months living on pork, chicken and Thai food of indeterminate origin. LOL

  • IowaGirl
    commented on 's reply
    Oh, I forgot to mention that when I flipped the steak, I flipped it onto a fresh smokin' hot section of the GrillGrates. I didn't do that on the first flip and didn't hear any sound of cracking fat. Moved it a few inches to a fresh part of the grill, and was back in business again. I have been musing on the thermodynamics of this method. The phase change of the water in the steak (melting from ice to water and then to water vapor) is "protecting" the inside of the meat. Cool!

  • IowaGirl
    commented on 's reply
    This steak came from a whole ribeye roll that I sliced into 1 1/2" steaks and 3" thick mini-roasts. I want to cook one of the roasts this way and see how that goes.

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