Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Brisket 3 Ways - Pastrami, burnt ends, bacon

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Johnny Booth
    commented on 's reply
    IFindZeroBadCooks. No butter. The Point normally has enough fat to fry the beef. The fried beef just about melts in your mouth. Per my notes, I rendered a little too much internal fat on the point during the cook. Next time I will cook to 190f rather than 200f in hopes of more fat.

  • IFindZeroBadCooks
    commented on 's reply
    So you slice the brisket and fry it with some butter for the bacon?

  • fzxdoc
    replied
    Epic prep and cook. This was such a fun topic to read. You've got some great eats there.

    That homemade rye bread must have put the pastrami sammies over the top.

    Congrats on your excellent cook despite the work schedule.

    Kathryn

    Leave a comment:


  • Johnny Booth
    replied
    Wrap up:
    Ambitious cook, and I had to split it up into multiple days due to a tough work schedule.
    While the brisket was outstanding...they always are; and at the same time could always get better.

    I normally cook a full packer brisket until the flat is about 200 and feels like butter. That probably means that the point, especially where it meets the fat, is most likely 195 or under. In this case, I used the flat for pastrami, and so the point separate from the flat, and so caused more fat to render. Great for fresh slices, but not as fatty and rich as I like for burnt ends and ‘bacon’.

    if you noticed the deep and wonderful bark, I attribute that to cooking with wood and fire, and particularly the Franklin.
    The high flow draft, and clean burning wood fire allows perfect conditions for producing a lot of smoke flavor, without any bitterness from dirty smoke, or over-smoked flavor. I wrap in paper because the bark will actually become over cooked and dry due to the convection, but not because I am afraid of too much smoke.

    The other thing I notice about the Franklin is that while the thermometer, and my temp probes, reflected an average of 275f, it cooks like the temp is 225-250. Things seems to always take longer than I anticipate; but everything still tastes great.

    So the taste was excellent as always, but more fat is always better.

    Here is the bacon:

    Click image for larger version

Name:	467A4CC3-1AD9-4CB2-8C64-ABE61BEBCB44.jpeg
Views:	61
Size:	234.3 KB
ID:	1110676 Click image for larger version

Name:	C9D2CDD8-0B43-481E-ACFD-A2D886C39ADF.jpeg
Views:	121
Size:	193.1 KB
ID:	1110675

    Leave a comment:


  • Johnny Booth
    replied
    Here are the shots of the burnt ends. We don’t like to soak them in bbq sauce and re-smoke. Rather we fry them in their own fat until they are crispy. Only takes about 10-15 minutes to make.
    Before Frying:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	75F891C0-008A-41D9-819C-CF42086559B4.jpeg
Views:	87
Size:	213.3 KB
ID:	1110491

    After:

    Click image for larger version

Name:	AD4F65B4-2C07-4EC0-AB10-C16B9C4777C3.jpeg
Views:	82
Size:	212.3 KB
ID:	1110492

    then I deglaze with beef broth and a little bbq sauce to soften them up and glaze them.
    for this batch the Ends soaked up about a cup of beef broth, and about a 1/2 cup of bbq sauce.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	B756BB94-8483-469C-BDC0-C440AA48ACEF.jpeg
Views:	106
Size:	202.9 KB
ID:	1110490


    The frying seems to add some durability so they don’t fall apart. They come out like candy, soft and rich, full of beefy flavor, with a nice carmalized crust and the bbq glaze for a little sweet and spicy candy coating. 😋

    Click image for larger version

Name:	D009E760-F0AC-4213-8A39-71CC1ED218F1.jpeg
Views:	81
Size:	245.6 KB
ID:	1110493

    Here is a shot of the Point after slicing off a nice hunk for burnt ends off both sides.
    This is how I discovered the ‘bacon’ idea.
    Looking at it, it is easy to see how a thin slice would fry up, and how tasty that would be.
    I will post some pics of our breakfast tomorrow.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	D60B7F60-DD8A-4CB5-86EB-79524CB4F281.jpeg
Views:	84
Size:	206.9 KB
ID:	1110494

    Leave a comment:


  • Joey877
    commented on 's reply
    I knew they were the same plant but somehow never connected the fact that people who had that genetic predisposition to cilantro would have the same reaction to coriander. That's because I'm nowhere near as smart as I would like to think I am...

  • IFindZeroBadCooks
    commented on 's reply
    Joey877 at least in the US, cilantro are the leaves and stalks of the plant while coriander is the dried seeds. So, you gotta leave both out.

  • Joey877
    commented on 's reply
    I get the soap thing as it is apparently genetic. People either like cilantro or despise it depending on their genetics. There's just a lot of coriander in that rub so your comment surprised me. I'm sure it's still good, though!

  • IFindZeroBadCooks
    commented on 's reply
    Joey877 yes I leave out both cilantro and coriander as both taste like soap to my wife. Both my daughter and the wife request my pastrami routinely so it may taste a bit different but apparently still awesome. FWIW I also double the rub recipe too for a full brisket as I don’t find it is enough.

  • Joey877
    commented on 's reply
    Question - you leave out all of the coriander from the recipe, or just the whole seeds? I have been making pastrami since before Meathead changed the recipe to use half ground and half whole peppercorns and coriander and I honestly have never changed to use the whole ones. But I can't imagine this would be the same flavor profile if you leave the coriander out altogether?

  • efincoop
    replied
    Great write up so far, I'm looking forward to reading the finale!

    Leave a comment:


  • IFindZeroBadCooks
    replied
    The pastrami looks outstanding! And yes I am like you in that I double the rub recipe while leaving out the cilantro and coriander (tastes like soap for the wife). Well done!

    I am also quite curious to see this beef bacon.
    Last edited by IFindZeroBadCooks; October 12, 2021, 06:41 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Johnny Booth
    replied
    The Cook:

    ​Pictures of my setup.

    Serial#50 Franklin BBQ, Coal Powder-coat.
    PK360 - Grey Powder-coat.
    Covered wood rack for pre-cut splits.

    The only modification to the offset was this 4-way vent on the top of the stack.
    The un-vented stack was smoking the screen and the white beams.
    This also allows me to put up the big umbrella if it rains, or is too hot.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	A4D1B45A-AD4A-42A1-8864-582918A5762C.jpeg
Views:	159
Size:	234.8 KB
ID:	1108956 Click image for larger version

Name:	B2C3BD43-3F7E-47F0-A856-A47A712A0FB8.jpeg
Views:	104
Size:	232.1 KB
ID:	1108957

    The cook. Target smoker temps above 250, averaging 275.

    I start with a full chimney of hot coals and then add a couple of large splits, 3-4” wide and 7” long, to get things going. This smoker requires a bed of coals and burning wood fire. The balance of coals to splits is similar to large offsets. Under operation, I use ~ 2”x2”x7” splits. The rest is a discussion for another channel.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	7EC1F4FE-EB00-47A3-B845-576FE73E24D8.jpeg
Views:	109
Size:	252.8 KB
ID:	1108959

    The meat. The start, Pastrami on the left and Point on the right.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	F3BA3F19-5800-4F7E-B3CB-E12C3B49BC9F.jpeg
Views:	107
Size:	180.3 KB
ID:	1108958

    .....a few hours into the cook.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	20E093D0-1F60-4337-92BA-2DB316F9298A.jpeg
Views:	105
Size:	271.3 KB
ID:	1108960

    I wrapped the pastrami in foil at 150f, about 4 hours.
    I wrapped the Point in pink paper at 165f, about 6 hours.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	223DE781-E1EE-4EEC-A7EC-7D76A636EA35.jpeg
Views:	108
Size:	199.9 KB
ID:	1108961


    The Pastrami finished quickly after I wrapped it, at about 6 hours.
    Here it is fresh off the smoker. We tasted it, but it was late, so rest for 2 hours and chilled overnight.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	9DD2D41A-3915-4AA2-8F93-A07DCE7CDF72.jpeg
Views:	110
Size:	264.2 KB
ID:	1108962

    The Point was still going for another 5 hours. More on that later.

    Here are the money shots of the pastrami.

    I sliced it thin and steamed it for about 10 minutes to heat it up.
    My wife made an artisan rye bread.
    The meat was moist, tender and FULL of flavor.
    Highly recommend trying the recipe.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	61691CD6-F544-4A47-BBD2-A3DC8B4B1916.jpeg
Views:	104
Size:	205.9 KB
ID:	1108963
    Click image for larger version

Name:	AA0C2D59-68FF-4777-8462-26126D0C3B77.jpeg
Views:	104
Size:	234.9 KB
ID:	1108964

    Next Post Tomorrow on the brisket.

    Leave a comment:


  • Johnny Booth
    commented on 's reply
    I probably should not call it bacon b/c I don’t cure the Point, just a regular smoke to around 200f.
    There is often leftover brisket and I noticed that some points can be very fatty.
    I put aside a 1/2 of a cooked point a while back. When I took it out to re-heat it, it just looked like bacon. So I cut it thin and fried it crispy. It was one of the best experiences I’ve had with brisket.

  • DogFaced PonySoldier
    replied
    Wow, looking forward to this. I've always wondered about beef bacon, but haven't ever found belly - so you're going to do bacon from the point?

    Interesting...

    Leave a comment:

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
Working...
X
false
0
Guest
500
["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
false
false
{"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
Yes
Rubs Promo

Spotlight

These are not ads or paid placements. These are some of our favorite tools and toys.

These are products we have tested, won our top awards, and are highly recommend. Click here to read how we test, about our medals, and what they mean.

Use Our Links To Help Keep Us Alive

A big part of this site is our unbiased equipment and product reviews. We love playing with toys and we have no problem calling them the way we see them. Some companies pay a finder’s fee if a reader clicks a link on AmazingRibs.com and buys a product. It has zero impact on our reviews, zero impact on the price you pay, and the sites never tell us what you bought, but it has a major impact on our ability to keep this site alive! So before you buy, please click our links. Here’s a link that takes you to a page on Amazon that has some of our favorite tools and toys: https://tinyurl.com/amazingribs


The Pit Barrel Cooker May Be Too Easy


The PBC has a rabid cult following for good reason. It is absolutely positively without a doubt the best bargain on a smoker in the world. Period. This baby will cook circles around the cheap offset sideways barrel smokers because temperature control is so much easier.

Click here to read our detailed review and the raves from people who own them


Blackstone Rangetop Combo: Griddle And Deep Fryer In One


The flat top does the burgers and the fryer does the fries. Use the griddle for bacon, eggs, grilled cheese, and so much more. And why deep fry indoors when you can avoid the smell and mess by doing it outside!

Click here to read our detailed review and to order


Finally, A Great Portable Pellet Smoker


Green Mountain’s portable Davy Crockett Pellet Smoker is one mean tailgating and picnic machine. But it’s also gaining popularity with people who want to add a small, set it and forget it pellet smoker to their backyard arsenal. And with their WiFi capabilities you can control and monitor Davy Crocket from your smart phone or laptop.

Click here to read our detailed review and to order


Groundbreaking Hybrid Thermometer!

Thermapen One Instant Read Thermometer

The FireBoard Spark is a hybrid combining instant-read capability, a cabled temperature probe, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity. We gave Spark a Platinum Medal for pushing the envelope of product capability while maintaining high standards of design and workmanship.

Click here to read our comprehensive Platinum Medal review

 

Comprehensive Temperature Magnet With 80+ Important Temps

Amazingribs.com temperature magnet
Winner of the National BBQ Association’s product of the year award. This 8.5″ x 11″ magnet contains more that 80 benchmark temperatures for meats (both USDA recommended temps as well as the temps chefs recommend), fats and oils, sugars, sous vide, eggs, collagens, wood combustion, breads, and more. Although it is not certified as all-weather, we have tested it outdoors in Chicago weather and it has not delaminated in three years, but there is minor fading.

Click here to order.


Grilla Pellet Smoker proves good things come in small packages

We always liked Grilla. The small 31.5″ x 29.5″ footprint makes it ideal for use where BBQ space is limited, as on a condo patio.
Click here for our review on this unique smoker


Is This Superb Charcoal Grill A Kamado Killer?


The PK-360, with 360 square inches of cooking space, this rust free, cast aluminum charcoal grill is durable and easy to use. Four-way venting means it’s easy to set up for two zone cooking with more control than single vent Kamado grills. It is beautifully designed, completely portable, and much easier to set up for 2-zone cooking than any round kamado.

Click here to read our detailed review of the PK 360

Click here to order directly and get an exclusive AmazingRibs.com deal