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Mountain Lion

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    Mountain Lion

    I was recently asked to cook this as a sampler for a VIP section at a charity event and thought I should add this for posterity's sake. After texting with a cook at a game reserve in South Africa, who occasionally prepares African Lion, this is the recipe we used. Fortunately, it is a very simple cook, but obtaining the meat can be hazardous to your health.

    Simple Brine:
    1 gallon water
    1 cup white sugar
    1 cup kosher salt

    Rub:
    I used Huskee RibRub without the additional brown sugar at the end. Or, use your favorite pork rub.

    Additional ingredient:
    Duck Fat

    Directions:
    1. Place the Mountain Lion in the brine mix overnight or for 12 hours. Remove and thoroughly rinse to remove all brine from surface. Pat the meat dry with paper towels, coat with duck fat, and season with rub.

    2. Over hot coals, cook the meat until it reaches an internal temp of 135 degrees. Remove, allow to rest for 5 minutes and serve.

    Cooking Notes:
    This meat, as with most wild game meats, is extremely lean. The brine, in addition to adding moisture into the meat, will also remove any "gamey" taste. The meat should be cooked to no more than a maximum internal temperature of 145 degrees, or it will become like shoe leather. The meat itself will appear to be like a pork loin and very similar in taste/texture.

    #2
    FYI- since mountain lions eat other animals, it should be cooked above 150 in order to prevent Trichinosis. 160 internal is generally recommended.

    I know Steve Rinella cooked the loin to about 165 and it seemed OK.

    I'd definitely like to try some.
    Last edited by Jerod Broussard; July 8, 2021, 11:27 PM.

    Comment


    • tstalafuse
      tstalafuse commented
      Editing a comment
      Steve R. I didn't risk my life to harvest it, someone else did, which I am always fine with them doing. It was given to me by the hunter who had it processed at a licensed facility. Again, pork has the exact same "disease" and do you not eat the pork loin and tenderloin at an IT of 140-145? Every recipe on this website for pork loin and tenderloin calls for that as the IT cook temp.

    • Steve R.
      Steve R. commented
      Editing a comment
      tstalafuse, I'm pretty sure the wild game aspect of mountain lion is what makes it higher risk for trichinosis. Commercial pork, according to the CDC, is very low risk, based on the hogs' diet. Anyway, my comment was made entirely in jest. I would definitely try some mountain lion if it was available.

    • tstalafuse
      tstalafuse commented
      Editing a comment
      Steve R. and we all know we can trust the govt.. right? Anyway, the meat is 'treated" by a licensed processor the exact same way to kill the trichinosis so that it can be consumed safely at 140-145.

    #3
    Do you have any photos?

    Comment


    • tstalafuse
      tstalafuse commented
      Editing a comment
      Unfortunately, no. We were also cooking 15 other samples, so I was moving way too fast for pictures.
      Last edited by tstalafuse; July 9, 2021, 08:48 AM.

    #4
    Now that’s a new one. How did you obtain it? +1 on pics.

    Comment


    • tstalafuse
      tstalafuse commented
      Editing a comment
      It was taken by a local hunter in Northern Colorado. No pictures.

    #5
    tstalafuse You didn't mention what the cut of meat was. It must have been frozen, as they are not in season now.

    Comment


    • tstalafuse
      tstalafuse commented
      Editing a comment
      The meat processor labeled it as a "roast", but it was slightly less than half a pound. Yes, it had been previously frozen (as were the other 15 wild game meats we cooked).

    #6
    Sound very interesting. Does it pair with PBR?
    Happy grilling to you

    Comment


    • tstalafuse
      tstalafuse commented
      Editing a comment
      I think they were serving Bud Light, but I would have served a Kolsch.

    #7
    "Fortunately, it is a very simple cook, but obtaining the meat can be hazardous to your health."...love it! Did my rub taste good on it? This is the first I've heard of using a pork/chicken rub on wild red meat. Very cool!

    Comment


    • tstalafuse
      tstalafuse commented
      Editing a comment
      Huskee Yes, it was really good, but I suspect that is because Mtn. Loin is one of the other "white meats" like chicken/pork. While I didn't try it on the other game meats I cooked, I think it would have gone nicely on the elk and other venison steaks.

    #8
    A very interesting recipe. I do not eat wild meat often, the cooking is very long and it is not always possible to get it.
    I'll try, thanks!

    Comment


    • Steve R.
      Steve R. commented
      Editing a comment
      I hear field mouse pie is pretty awesome if you can't find a mountain lion. http://wegottaeat.com/paterbabe/recipes/field-mouse-pie. It has kind of a Spammy taste when done right.

    • Donw
      Donw commented
      Editing a comment
      Boy its been busy this morning. 10 interesting posts from 8:41 to now. Hormel must have added marketing staff.

    • tstalafuse
      tstalafuse commented
      Editing a comment
      johnsoncody It was interesting to try, but no doubt expensive to actually obtain. I honestly couldn't have told you the difference between it and a pork loin, so I wouldn't go out of my way to cook it again.

    #9


    Oh, cool. You will have to try to do it.

    Comment

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