Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Doing An Asian Stir-Fry Tonight….Rookie Needs Help

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Doing An Asian Stir-Fry Tonight….Rookie Needs Help

    I just put my new SnS Kettle together yesterday and burned it in. Tonight I wanna do a simple Asian beef stir fry using the SnS Drip N Griddle pan I bought with it. Here’s my ingredients list: Thinly sliced beef, onion, Bok Choy, mushrooms, sugar snap peas, green bell pepper and a fresh jalapeño pepper. I also bought a package of Udon stir-fry noodles.

    I have on hand some Soy Sauce, Thai Seasoning stir-in paste and some Gochujang Chili Sauce. I’ve never used Thai seasoning paste or Gochujang before. My questions concern the above 3 and are as follows:
    1. Should I use all 3 of these in my stir-fry, or just 2 of the 3?
    2. Should I use the Soy Sauce first when stir frying the vegetables, then add 1 or more of the above when done?
    3. Basically I was wondering at what point in the cooking or serving process should I use these, including the noodles? Attjack or anyone else with experience using these,Thanks in advance.


    Click image for larger version  Name:	7DD16FF2-71AE-47AF-8A39-E1E2EBD1ACC6.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	3.21 MB ID:	1126616
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Panhead John; November 15, 2021, 02:35 PM.

    #2
    Sounds like it's going to be great.

    I would brine the beef slices a couple of hours in the fridge with a good shot of soy sauce. If you have some dry sherry to add, too, that's even better. (Drain the brine liquid off the beef before putting it on to cook.) I'd make a separate sauce to add once everything is mostly cooked and combined. The sauce can be just about any combination of the soy sauce, gochujang and thai seasoning you want. I'd add more of the sherry, too (I use Chinese rice wine, it's great). If you want to thin the sauce a bit if you're high on the ingredients that are a paste, beef broth would work. Half a teaspoon of cornstarch in the sauce can help it thicken as you cook everything together at the end, too. Have the beef broth on hand to add if your sauce sets up too thick or things start looking dry.

    Comment


      #3
      Do you have any Dry Sherry? You can use the 1TBS of each soy sauce and dry sherry as a marinade on the beef. when I’ve used gochujang, it’s also as a marinade, so you could add a little of that if you wanted.

      The Thai Seasoning, taste it before you do anything, but you could add it as the marinade, or just add it in towards the end of stir fry when you add the noodles to finished beef and veg. You may need to toss a little chicken/beef stock at the end just so the noodles don’t stick?? I’ve never worked with those kind of noodles, but just an idea.

      hope that helps. I’m not great at stir fry but make it and that is how I may tackle the cook. Have fun!

      Comment


      • Panhead John
        Panhead John commented
        Editing a comment
        barelfly The only things I have even remotely close to the sherry is some Marsala cooking wine and some Red Wine Vinegar.

      • Troutman
        Troutman commented
        Editing a comment
        Oh but no one does it like Sherry !!! Woof !!

      • ComfortablyNumb
        ComfortablyNumb commented
        Editing a comment
        It is better when Sherry is wet, not dry.

      #4
      What I would do #1 cut the bok choy in pieces, example the large meaty part from the leafy part. The meaty part will take longer to cook than the leafy part. Cook the peas also separate cuz they will take the longest to cook, about 6+ minutes. Then cook the peppers, onions, after a bit add the leafy bok choy & mushrooms. The peppers & onions 3m,than the leafs & mushrooms another 2-3. This is three cooks, set aside, after cooking each batch cooking with a tbsp to 2 tbsp &; salt BTW.Then tbsp of oil & 12oz of beef, if you have more than 12oz of beef cook in two batch’s. I am assuming you are using a 14” wok. After cookin the beef then reintroduce the veggies, the spices & sauce last. The sauces only need a minute of cooking with the ingredients.
      So much for my numbering system.
      This is Asian cooking, don’t bother with a brine. It is just an unnecessary step. No Chinese or Thai cooking requires brine. With salt & soy sauce it’s overkill.
      Last edited by FireMan; November 15, 2021, 02:22 PM.

      Comment


      • barelfly
        barelfly commented
        Editing a comment
        Here you go. This is a good step by step.

      • Panhead John
        Panhead John commented
        Editing a comment
        Great suggestions on cutting and separating the bok choy. Didn’t even think about it, but of course makes perfect sense. When you say “spices and sauce” you’re referring to using both the paste and the Gochujang? And if so, how much should I use, maybe a tablespoon or so of each?

      • FireMan
        FireMan commented
        Editing a comment
        I’m just guessing at what yer cookin, but I assume ya ain’t feedin 6. Sounds right, tbsp each. Mix the paste into the sauce in a small bowl so you’ll dilute it a bit.

      #5
      I would start with the onion and bok chok per FireMan 's advice, gradually add in the other veggies, using some oil and at most add the soy sauce. Then push it all to the side and add your meat, again with some soy. That thin beef will cook quick. You are just searing and heating up the previously cooked noodles, so I would add that at the end, and then toss it all with the other sauces. Any sugary sauces tend to burn when cooking on a griddle, so do them at the end. To be honest, the Thai seasoning versus the Korean gochujang seasoning are different flavor profiles, and sorta competing sauces. You want to use one, or the other, probably not both together. They both will work with the soy though.

      My typical hibichi stir fry process is as follows:

      1. Get the griddle to about 350F, apply some oil.
      2. Add onions along with some minced garlic and ginger. Cook a couple minutes.
      3. Add other veggies, sometimes from frozen. Continue cooking, adding oil as needed.
      4. Add salt, pepper, and soy if needed, tossing veggies in it.
      5. Push veggies to the side and start rice or noodles on the griddle, with oil or butter, seasonings, etc.
      6. In a separate part of griddle, add more oil and put down the meat, seasoning as appropriate (salt, pepper, garlic, etc).
      7. As meat finishes, add some soy or teriyaki sauce.
      8. Combine everything and add sauce as needed.
      9. Serve!

      Also FireMan is spot on about no need for a brine with this type cooking.

      My experience is that when frying rice, it needs to be cooking on the griddle for almost the entire duration of the cook, tossing and pressing down as needed. Veggies also tend to need longer to cook than beef, so those go on before beef. Chicken you want to cook to safe temps. I use cut up boneless skinless thigh meat, and start it the same time as the veggies, in a separate part of griddle.

      Just remember that the DNG is not a huge flat top, and unless you turn it for just one end over the fire, most of it will be one heat level. So you MIGHT have to take some of the food off to a separate pan once its done, and then move on to the next thing. Put the other pan beside the DNG but not over the fire, and it will keep stuff warm. Also - remember to only use enough coals to fill the SNS about halfway up when using the DNG over it. You can warp the stainless DNG, and one of my two is quite warped. Still works, but has a curve to it that makes it sit wobbly on a table top. I think I would go after the cast iron DNG if I wanted to do much stir fry on the kettle, or after the SNS plancha.
      Last edited by jfmorris; November 15, 2021, 02:48 PM.

      Comment


      • Panhead John
        Panhead John commented
        Editing a comment
        Great suggestions Jim! I was actually reading the pamphlet SnS provided with the DNG today. It did mention using only half a chimney of coals to prevent warping. I’m deciding between using the SnS for the coals, or just doing the coals on the charcoal grate. Do you have a preference?

      • jfmorris
        jfmorris commented
        Editing a comment
        Panhead John I prefer putting them in the SNS, and if you have the one with the removable water resevoir, take it out. You can move the griddle over the coals or away from the coals to control heat, or even just partially over the coals. I think with the charcoal on the regular grate the heat will not be as "contained" as it will be by the walls of the SNS, and it will be harder to control griddle temp by moving it over or away from the heat.

      • Panhead John
        Panhead John commented
        Editing a comment
        I was leaning that way also. Mine does have the removable water tray.

      #6
      Everyone has their own approach, but I find that brining the meat a while in soy doesn't make the final product too salty but does help the meat to stay a bit juicier on the inside. This seems especially so for me with chicken breast.

      Comment


        #7
        OK, Grasshopper ... there's a million ways to skin this cat (not in the recipe, so don't hurt any cats).
        You may choose to marinate the beef ... or not. When I do it, I use a bit of soy sauce and a little cornstarch. Whatever you do, DON'T add salt (there's plenty'o salt in them thar soy sauces) Adding a bit of sugar, however is pretty common.

        As FireMan suggested, you will cook in separate batches (or "layers") before combining it all at the end.
        Slice all the veggies into similar sized bits so everything cooks at about the same rate.
        I would sauté the onions in a bit of oil first, until they begin to soften. I'd then add the 'shrooms and let them start to brown. Add the bok choy and let it soften, Finally, add the peppers and peas and cook until pretty much done. Right at the end, I'd season gingerly with salt (and maybe an equal amount of sugar) then set aside.
        I'd drain and sauté the meat next. I typically reserve a little raw chopped onion and/or garlic to sauté with the meat for a bit of added flavor. When the meat is just about done, add in the cooked veggies and stir-fry to blend and to make sure everything is properly softened and done.
        Finally, add the noodles and toss/stir fry to get everything combined. Then, add the sauce(s) (including more soy sauce if you want ... but be careful not to add too much). Toss to thoroughly coat/combine it all then serve.

        Make sure you have plenty of beer and/or wine on hand for the chef before, during, and after ... that way, it'll be perfectly delicious no matter what.

        OK ... so that's my version. If you ask me tomorrow, you'll probably get a slightly different answer ... but that's half the fun of asian-style cooking.

        Enjoy! And be sure to wear a pretty hat ... ...

        Edit: One final thought (unless I think of something else), this ain't French cooking so go easy on the sauce (except the beer/wine for the chef). Asian cooking is all about letting the main ingredients shine through.
        Last edited by MBMorgan; November 15, 2021, 03:02 PM.

        Comment


        • Panhead John
          Panhead John commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks Mike! Great suggestions…..but, plenty of cold beer AND a pretty hat is a given in the Panhead house. And not just when cooking.

        • shify
          shify commented
          Editing a comment
          Agreed with the cornstarch and soy sauce (and oil) marinade. It gives beef (or chicken) the proper texture. Just mix with your meats and then prep the rest of your ingredients and that is plenty of time

        #8
        I would concoct your sauce to taste and then prep everything else. Get that DnG hot, add some oil, and cook the beef until it's rare. That will happen fast. Then remove the beef, and cook the veggies adding the quickest cooking vegetables last. Then add the noodles, sauce, the reserved meat, and stir to combine. This should take just minutes so anything else you need to do for dinner should already be done. I've never purchased udon in a frozen bag. I'm guessing a few minutes is all it needs but check the package.

        Comment


        • Panhead John
          Panhead John commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks Attjack Actually the noodles aren’t frozen, they were at room temperature on a shelf in the Asian aisle. As jfmorris suggested, I shouldn’t use both the Thai seasoning paste and the Gochujang together? Just use one or the other?

        • jfmorris
          jfmorris commented
          Editing a comment
          Panhead John that is not actual straight up gochujang paste, but is more of a gochujang sauce that has sugar, water and such added to make it a good dipping sauce or sauce at the table. I've used it before, but not in cooking, more as a condiment. I've used it for chicken nuggets and other fried stuff as a dipping sauce.

          Squirt a little of each out and taste, and use the one you like the flavor of best in the cooking.

        • Attjack
          Attjack commented
          Editing a comment
          Panhead John Yeah, I would agree that the Gochujang might not be needed or necessarily go well with the other ingredients. I know nothing about that Thai paste. I would mix it with your Soy Sauce to taste then you can always squirt a little gochujang in a spoon with the sauce to help decide if it would all go together. In the future, you should consider having some oyster sauce on hand. It will thicken your sauce. Also, fish sauce should be in your pantry.

        #9
        I start with the mushrooms to evaporate a lot of their water content, then I add the onion and other seasonings like chili flakes, garlic and ginger and cook for a few minutes. Next is the bok choy and other veggies for a few more minutes and then cover to let it steam for about 4 minutes. Then I add the noodles for a minute or two. Now I add soy and whatever other liquids. Meat goes in last.

        Note that if you have a lot of liquid to add, use some cornstarch as a thickener. I will use the soy sauce to make a slurry of the cornstarch in a 1-1 ratio or so. That keeps the cornstarch from clumping. Stir well right before adding. (The noodles I use, Yakisoba frozen from Costco, generally have enough extra starch to thicken the sauce.)

        I generally use two sauces: soy and Hoisin and also add some Cream Sherry.

        Here is what I made two nights ago, eating the last of the leftovers tonight.

        Click image for larger version  Name:	stir-fry30.jpg Views:	0 Size:	48.9 KB ID:	1126658
        Last edited by mgaretz; November 15, 2021, 03:00 PM.

        Comment


        • mgaretz
          mgaretz commented
          Editing a comment
          Most of the meat I use is already cooked so it just need to be warmed through. But when I do broccoli beef I stir fry the meat quickly first.

        • FireMan
          FireMan commented
          Editing a comment
          Just sayin, if ya cover it yer not stir-fryin, yer steamin as stated.

        • mgaretz
          mgaretz commented
          Editing a comment
          It's only covered for a bit to steam the bok choy, and it's a very common technique in stir frying.

        #10
        I'm still experimenting with my technique. I do like doing everything separately, less chance of crowding the pan and steaming stuff. I then throw everything together, add the sauce (which always contains just a bit of cornstarch to thicken stuff) and then take it off the heat and serve.

        Comment


          #11
          That’s what’s so great about this place, so many replies with great tips and suggestions in just over an hour! It’d take a couple of days over at my favorite website, BBQ Brethren . Seriously, thanks guys. I’m actually gonna use one or more of almost everyone’s suggestions.

          I did take a couple of y’all’s tip of trying the Thai paste and Gochujang first. I mixed each with just a little Soy Sauce, and man….I have a winner! That Thai Seasoning stir-in paste was incredible, I kid you not. The Gochujang was good also, but I clearly liked the Thai paste better. Both of these tasted best when mixed with a little soy sauce. Attjack and others, you’ve got to give this stuff a try!

          Click image for larger version  Name:	10C6AED7-89DE-4209-8C03-9E6243412A7A.jpeg Views:	10 Size:	2.64 MB ID:	1126708

          Click image for larger version  Name:	E4C78426-A553-401A-A051-4ED5D84102B3.jpeg Views:	10 Size:	2.91 MB ID:	1126709
          Last edited by Panhead John; November 15, 2021, 04:40 PM.

          Comment


          • CaptainMike
            CaptainMike commented
            Editing a comment
            They really do make some fine products. I use their ginger often.

          • Panhead John
            Panhead John commented
            Editing a comment
            I used to use Ginger, then she ran off with The Professor.

          • CaptainMike
            CaptainMike commented
            Editing a comment
            Really, I heard MaryAnn....

          #12
          Good advice above for sure. I didn't see it specifically stated, but cut everything up before starting. For me, everything goes in it's own container, and I line up the containers next to the wok in the order I plan to add them. I use a squirt bottle for the oil of choice so that I can easily add a bit when necessary.

          You have your sauces lined up for this cook, but here are a few more that you might want to consider if ya decide to repeat:

          teriyaki sauce
          black bean sauce, (or paste)
          chili bean paste (hot)
          toasted sesame oil
          hoisin sauce
          fish sauce
          oyster sauce
          garlic clove(s)
          fresh ginger
          I probably have forgotten something...

          Here's my basic sauce, but I do change it up from time to time:

          3 oz teriyaki sauce
          1 tbs soy sauce
          1 tbs black bean sauce
          1 tbs sesame oil
          chili bean paste to taste 'cause it's hot. I can get away with about 1/2 tbs without my wife complaining it's too hot.
          3 or 4 cloves garlic minced
          1 tbs grated ginger. A lot of recipes call for cutting the ginger into coins and frying in the oil, then remove and add whatever is next.

          I do marinate chicken and beef for an hour or two, but shrimp for only a few minutes because it seems to absorb the flavors easily.

          And the most important thing for me is to do the prep earlier in the day so it doesn't seem like I've been prepping and cooking continuously for hours...
          Last edited by RonB; November 15, 2021, 04:29 PM.

          Comment


          • Panhead John
            Panhead John commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks Ron, I forgot about the garlic and will add some. Great suggestion about using the containers and lining them up in order. I’m gonna take some pics tonight, I might just show off that suggestion on SUWYC. If so, I’ll give you full credit, don’t wanna get sued. 🥸

          #13
          If it was prepped with a nakiri or a santoku ,,,,
          Its just another twist on a veggie,protein pile of goodness,,,,

          Comment


            #14
            I'll lend you my Asian wife but its going to cost you dearly !!!!

            Comment


            • Panhead John
              Panhead John commented
              Editing a comment
              She didn’t charge me nothing last time.

              😂😂😂
              Last edited by Panhead John; November 15, 2021, 05:48 PM.

            #15

            I am late to the party and you have received some great advice. Here are a couple of links to channels for Asian Stir Fry and cooking that have helped me learn. I find watching videos helps a ton.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdqXVoop4V8

            https://thewoksoflife.com/chinese-ch...i-brown-sauce/

            https://www.recipetineats.com/real-c...tir-fry-sauce/

            https://www.youtube.com/user/theSchoolofWok


            Most recipes have you marinate the meat in some combination soy sauce, dark soy sauce, sugar, Chinese wine, and corn starch to add flavor and tenderize.

            Cut up all ingredients and put them in separate bowls - Mise en place. Important because this goes quickly.

            Make a sauce - soy, dark soy, Chinese wine, oyster sauce, brown sugar, sesame oil. I tend to avoid pre-made sauces because they taste off to me.

            Heat pan add oil. Stir fry the meat until almost fully cooked. Remove to a bowl.

            Add oil Stir fry bigger and harder veggies first (sometimes I partially steam to soften - (like broccoli). Remove.

            Add oil and onions stir fry 1-2 minutes. Add garlic and ginger stir fry 30-60 seconds. Add sauce. stir a bit. Add meat and big veggies back in. mix. If you want to thicken use a slurry of water and corn starch.

            For woks you cook in batches to keep the heat going to avoid steaming the food. On a griddle with different heat zones you can cook and then move to a lower heat section of the grill. That Drippin' Griddle looks small so you probably need to cook in batches and remove then combine at the end.

            Good luck!
            Last edited by Old Glory; November 16, 2021, 07:53 AM.

            Comment


            • Panhead John
              Panhead John commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks Old Glory. I wound up doing it mostly that way. Since I was cooking for only myself, I was able to fit all the vegetables in sequence on the DNG. I like the fact it has an edge all the way around.
              Last edited by Panhead John; November 16, 2021, 08:12 AM.

          Announcement

          Collapse
          No announcement yet.
          Working...
          X
          false
          0
          Guest
          500
          ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
          false
          false
          {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
          Yes
          Rubs Promo