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Stall temperatures at higher altitudes

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    Stall temperatures at higher altitudes

    I live in Ft. Collins Colorado at ~5000 feet above sea level and have just recently started smoking meat again. While smoking a brisket flat I blew threw the 150 degree stall point, but when I hit 170 it stalled out. Is this something common at higher altitudes?

    #2
    I wouldn't think so. It was probably just that particular brisket you cooked. Some stall at different temps. Your thermo may have been in a warmer spot as well. That would be my best guess. My Briskets usually stall at about 165F to 170 F here is Minnesota. The higher altitude would pertain to the amount of oxygen to the fire itself, not the meat. Water boils at about 205 F at a mile high. So if anything, I think the stall may come earlier. But again I think it was just that particular flat or your probe placement.

    Comment


    • Eggman
      Eggman commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for the comment. My thinking was directly related to the oxygen/fire issue, as I was told by the gent at A-maz-n that my fire needs to be about 25 degrees hotter than recipes suggest due specifically to the altitude. I'm running at about 245-250 (using an WSM with Maverick ET-733), and using a probe in the brisket and in the grommet of the WSM for ambient internal temp. I think my probes are fine, just always hit stall at around 150 when I smoked meat in Texas. Good news: just broke through, now at almost 180.

    • Spinaker
      Spinaker commented
      Editing a comment
      Good to hear!!! Thats the thing about BBQ my friend, there are always variables that keep you guessing! Good luck with the rest of the cook. Eggman

    • Eggman
      Eggman commented
      Editing a comment
      Yep, without the variability life would be much less enjoyable. Keeps me on my toes and always learning something new.

    #3
    This is an interesting question! We should ask this question with a couple more bits of info...
    1. dr Blonder says: "The stall is evaporative cooling." http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/the_stall.html
    2. generally a higher attitude is also a dryer climate

    Lets try to answer the question with these things in mind... just an idea.




    Comment


    • Spinaker
      Spinaker commented
      Editing a comment
      Good point smarkley. Thats why I was thinking about the boiling point at a higher altitude. So i would think that it would evaporate faster than at sea level, given the lower atmospheric pressure in CO.

    • smarkley
      smarkley commented
      Editing a comment
      I live in a dry climate at 2600+ ft... my stalls are around 170 and do not last long at all... I was thinking that it is because of the drier climate evaporates faster.

      I don't know... Maybe we can get Dr Blonder to weigh in on it
      Last edited by smarkley; July 19, 2015, 07:13 PM.

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