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Crisp chicken skin

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    Crisp chicken skin

    A little help please. I have a backwoods smoker (Chubby) and I'm having trouble getting a crisp skin on my chicken and turkeys. The meat turns out perfect. I use the water pan for moisture, should I take that out at the end of the cook? If so, when. Or is there something else I can do to crisp it up,

    #2
    Are you smoking the birds at the traditional low temp?
    Dry brine the birds, leave em uncovered in the refrigerator to dry the skin. Cook em at >325 degrees.
    You can rub them with a high smoke point oil before cooking.

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      #3
      Probably not relevant to your situation, but using a rotisserie is a great way to do birds. I cook at about 375°F

      Comment


        #4
        I have also found that a dusting of baking powder also helps

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          #5
          Here are a couple of topics here that might help:

          http://pitmaster.amazingribs.com/for...ry-on-a-smoker

          http://pitmaster.amazingribs.com/for...ker/48318-skin

          Kathryn

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            #6
            I agree with both Ernest and Burn. I leave mine in the fridge uncovered for at least a day and let the skin dry out. Then I dust them with baking powder to get that extra hit of crispness. The skin on the chicken will look really tight over the bird, thats what you want to get that crispy skin.
            Good luck

            -John

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              #7
              I rub the chicken (usually a 5-6 pound bird) under the skin with a salted rub and rub the skin with a 1:4 baking powder to rub mixture. Then it sits uncovered in the fridge for 24 to 48 hours. In a 325 to 370 degree smoker for an hour or so, and it's done with crispy skin. Sometimes the skin isn't crispy all over--the legs and breast skin is crisp but the "shoulder" skin is more pliable.

              Kathryn

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                #8
                It starts off like this



                And ends up like this



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                • Spinaker
                  Spinaker commented
                  Editing a comment
                  How long do you usually let it sit out? I go for about a day.

                • Ernest
                  Ernest commented
                  Editing a comment
                  3 days for turkey. Lightly tented first two days.
                  1-2 days chicken. If I'm going for 2, I lightly tent it first day.

                • Spinaker
                  Spinaker commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I am trying dial in my dry brine. How much salt and or baking soda do you use on your chickens before you throw them on the PBC?

                #9
                I'm much less motivated than my fellow Pit Members. I dry brine mine anywhere from 3 to 9 hrs, depending if the meal is planned or last minute. To me, the secret is oiling the skin lightly right before cooking and cooking it HOT. I mean 340 minimum but usually more like 360, 380, 390. They may not have the idyllic golden brown skin, more like a darker mahogany, but it gets me crisp skin.

                Comment


                • fuzzydaddy
                  fuzzydaddy commented
                  Editing a comment
                  On Friday I'm cooking 2 whole chickens using your brine I found on another post (1 C table salt, 1 C sugar, 1 gallon water - keeping these proportions if more is needed to cover), dry then add a light oil coating, cooking hot, wood the whole cook, to 160 breasts. I'm considering just sprinkling a little garlic powder and black pepper to keep it simple. Now I've worked up an appetite typing this.

                #10
                fuzzydaddy I've never done whole birds that way, that's the brine I use for pieces. I would think it would work if the chicken is submerged. If it's too salty, next time go 1/3 less time, or vice versa.

                Right now I'm doing some 1"+ thick loin chops and I used the same brine, except no sugar for loin chops. And light sprinkle garlic powder, fresh pepper, and herbs de provence. Almost done....
                Last edited by Huskee; July 7, 2015, 05:13 PM.

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                  #11
                  Thanks Huskee. I was hoping that by posting, you would catch any of my errors, and you did. Much appreciated as always.

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                  • Huskee
                    Huskee commented
                    Editing a comment
                    It might not be an error at all, it may work out just fine. I just haven't done it myself that way. I tend to dry brine whole chickens, either with salt or with my salted rib rub. Just a "how I've done it" thing. I do, however, think the sugar in a wet chicken brine is magical. If you're doing two, why not do one wet and the other dry brine? Then you'll have some great side by side comparative testing.

                  • fuzzydaddy
                    fuzzydaddy commented
                    Editing a comment
                    On the wet brine I'm going with 2/3 C table salt instead of 1 C. Good idea...I'll dry brine the other one. Cook both the same way. This will also be the first time I've used the SnS for temps above 325. I'll light a full chimney and see how it goes!

                  #12
                  Hi All,

                  This info doesn't directly relate to crispy skin, but I feel it noteworthy to present a "Plan B", i.e., Oven.

                  So I wanted to do some leg quarters on the GG's. So I salted them for several hours uncovered. Really busy domestic weekend, and #1 was insistent on Q'ing the legs in the oven. ("... know when to hold'em, know when to fold'em...").

                  We had mashed potatoes on the side, and drained BBQ sauce, drippings, and mixed 'em in.

                  Results:

                  Dinner and leftovers = CATNIP! OMG!

                  -- Ed

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