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REALLY feeling old.

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    REALLY feeling old.

    Sat down to Supper last night with my Son and Granddaughter who is 11 years old.
    She wanted to talk about the old days because she is taking a HISTORY class and was asked to question Grandparents on how we grew up.
    Kind of a sobering experience.
    I KNOW I'm old but kind of avoid thinking about it.
    One of the things that kind of shocked her, and I think left her doubting I was being honest was food, and drink.
    I grew up in the '60s in a small rural Kansas town out in the boonies.
    Family of 7 with 3 brothers, a sister, and 2 parents who actually lived together!
    As clearly as I can remember we NEVER went out to a meal in a restaurant. I mean NEVER!
    I do recall an occasional Saturday morning with my Grandma and a trip to Duckwalls to visit the diner inside. A REAL treat was the ham salad sandwich on toast.
    Back then NO fast food chains, no McD's or Hardees, no 7-11's or Quick Trips with the hot dog rollers and a bank of soda machines 100' long.
    We did have a Dairy Queen and made a trip twice a year. Right before school, and another right after school let out.
    When we would travel it was a quick trip into the local grocery store in whatever town was closest at the time for a loaf of bread, lunch meat and chips. You hungry? Well there you go. There was always one of those old water bladders tied onto the front of the car so beverages were included if you liked tepid water.
    My fine dining experience in my later years was pretty much limited to bar food because that was usually where I would end up after courses at college and work was over. Sandwiches or dogs or sausages or whatever they're serving was way better than going back to the apartment and warming up water on the stove top for ramen or Mac and cheese. No microwaves back then. unheard of yet and 15 years in the future.
    The one miraculous event was. I was going to College in Wichita, KS the home town of Pizza Hut which was just getting started back then. THAT was some fancy fine dining and I did manage a LOT of pizza eating.
    I will never forget meeting my wife and being introduced to Chinese food. I had absolutely NO clue what the hell was going on or what she was talking about. I do remember thinking--well this will be the end of this relationship because I'm kind of looking like a REAL hick. She did guide me through it though.
    Once again my Grand daughter who can order Chinese with the best of them, and handle chopsticks like a pro just couldn't comprehend not understanding even a little what the hell I was being asked to order so long ago.
    Grand daughter has her story to tell but I think she is still a bit skeptical.
    Strange how times change, and how what is normal today was exotic beyond comprehension not that long ago.
    AND! I am a RETRO MAN. I still love a white bread and bologna sandwich to this day. Truthfully kind of to the point my wife gets a little upset sometimes when she asks what I would like for Supper and I request them. Fry that bologna and I'm a happy man!



    #2
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Name:	9ECB0CED-42AC-497A-AA98-798CEEDBA82F.jpeg
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ID:	924935 Fried bologna on white bread. Yes! Man that’s still livin’ to me! I mean that. And now, I smoke it! 🤣

    Comment


    • Cheef
      Cheef commented
      Editing a comment
      OH hell yes!!!

    • Bkhuna
      Bkhuna commented
      Editing a comment
      Oklahoma Prime Rib is a very underrated meat. I make a yellow mustard based slaw to go on mine.

    #3
    Yup. A fried bologna sandwich is tough to beat!! I bought and older 1 ton truck for hauling stuff . It has hans crank windows in it.. my kids thought I was joking when I told them that's how the windows go up and down,. They didn't believe me but the spent hours cranking the windows up and down!!

    Comment


      #4
      While a different generation, I begin to feel old when I have conversations with my kids about growing up with:
      • a TV with 3 channels you got up to change,
      • if you missed a show you missed it, so you make plans to be there to watch a show
      • my dad getting a satellite dish (the giant things of the 80s out in the yard)
      • a record player with 8-track deck that my parents had in the living room (my kids think vinyl was recently invented),
      • a phone that hung on the wall and you spun the dial to make a call,
      • "downloading" a song was recording it off the radio on a blank tape,
      • air conditioning in a vehicle was a luxury for the wealthy,
      • McDonald's (et al) had smoking sections and ash trays on the tables,
        • my mom gasped when she saw that a McD's value meal cost $2.99 ("there's NO WAY I'm paying that!" she exclaimed)
      • gas caps were behind the license plate,
      • roller skating rinks were a thing, and we loved it
      • you wrote letters to a girl you liked, actual handwritten letters on paper
      • etc etc etc

      Comment


      • EdF
        EdF commented
        Editing a comment
        Dewesq55 - likewise, but not on the lake except for the first 3-4 years. Your description of Val's was on-target. That was always a treat when it happened.

      • Dewesq55
        Dewesq55 commented
        Editing a comment
        Where did you live EdF ?

      • EdF
        EdF commented
        Editing a comment
        Most of the time Golden Hill, not far from Main St. Went to St. Joseph, then out of town for High School.Guessing from your handle, you may have known my brother Gary Falis. He went to Immaculate for a year, then DHS.

        Yourself?

      #5
      Guys....all I can say is I get it!!!!
      We never lacked for the basic things growing up be there was no over the top either.
      Seen more things than some, less things than most.
      I'm 64 and 2 months and 11 days, I feel every bloody moment of it some day's.
      Seems I eat more Advil Gel caps than food these days.
      Looks like I may move my retirement up to Nov 30 from Jan.

      Comment


      • Cheef
        Cheef commented
        Editing a comment
        We were the same.
        Always well fed but always fed at home.
        Never went hungry but I will have to say I absolutely refuse to eat ham and lima beans to this day.
        I think my childhood was pretty much normal for back then.

      • Bkhuna
        Bkhuna commented
        Editing a comment
        You know your getting old when you take all your drugs AFTER the concert.

      #6
      I like this thread. I'm 65 and glad I grew up when I did. My Dad was a Dairy Farmer. There was always something to do. Work was encouraged and fun! We ate lots of meat and potatoes type meals and my Mom was a very good baker. Being the youngest of 6 was good too. Life was simpler. Great memories!

      Comment


        #7
        I'm in the same boat - my parents never went to a restaurant except the yearly trip from VA to MS to visit my grandparents. I always got fried chicken - not strips, and every place we went had it. I never had Chinese or Mexican until I was an adult. And my wife introduced me to Chinese.

        But just in case you are not feeling old enough, my brother sent me this and I was going to post it in jokes, but it seems to fit here:

        Click image for larger version

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        Comment


        • bbqLuv
          bbqLuv commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks for the walk down memory lane.
          68 yrs old.

        • TripleB
          TripleB commented
          Editing a comment
          I’m 62. Back in my 20’s I was a bartender while going to college. Coming home from closing the bar, I stopped and got a meatball sandwich and propped myself up in front of the TV and turned on MTV. By chance got to see the original broadcast of Michael Jackson’s music video Thriller. Memories.

        #8
        What a great opportunity you and your grandchildren have. I regret not asking my grandparents, parents, aunts and uncles more about themselves and their early lives, and I regret all the missed opportunities to get to know them even better. With me being so young they were always just there and I could not conceptualize one day they would not be.

        And to Huskee, for us it was one channel that came on at 4 PM and went dark at 11 PM. We all spent a lot of our young lives watching an Indian Chief test pattern on the TV just waiting for 4 PM for them to start showing a program. Now I’ve got 100’s of channels available but still only one that we watch regularly.(PBS) so we still don’t ever need to change the channel.🙂

        Comment


        • smokin fool
          smokin fool commented
          Editing a comment
          Yup remember the TV channels' there were 2 back then in Toronto, if you had a really good antenna you could get Hamilton, if you were cutting edge antenna and the wind was blowing the right way across the lake BUFFALO....Dude, if you could pull in Buffalo you had friends and lots of em

        • Cheef
          Cheef commented
          Editing a comment
          Gramper Gayle is getting frail in the body but his mind is amazing.
          He remembers things from 80 and 90 years ago with amazing clarity.
          Names, dates, locations. I seem to have developed a knack to get him talking while others in the family seem to have difficulty making him understand them. I believe the trick is SLOW and LOUD and I am both. That plus you have to give him a bit of time to process and get his memories out. REALLY cool as hell to listen to him.

        #9
        Donw
        My family is doubly blessed as we are caregivers to my wifes 95 year old Father.
        We bought a little house next door to ours and grabbed him out of the home he was unhappy in and we moved him into that house I had plans to rent out 3 years ago. Bad for my budget but invaluable for my own feeling of giving back a bit.
        He is one of the Greatest Generation and teaches my Grand Daughter valuable lessons weekly when everyone comes over for Family Dinner.
        He was one of the first occupying troops to land on the Japanese mainland in WWII.
        My Grand daughter went through a super hero phase a few years ago, and I was able to set her down and explain to her she was eating with a real life super hero every Friday night.
        I believe what I told her to be absolute truth.
        Those farm boys were gathered up and volunteered to rid the world of what at that time was unspeakable evil. For him and millions of others it was a first look at a world outside their community and must have been just frightening.
        It is a bit strange how the gentlest of people aren't what they seem to be.
        He has had spells of UTI which gives him hallucinations or I guess flashbacks. His blood daughters kind of head for the hills when they happen because they say it is like their Dad disappears and someone else takes over. I kind of take care of him when that happens and it IS surprising to hear his stories. You absolutely would never hear those stories when he was feeling well.
        WOW--that kind of went off track but Ormas Gayle Richmond IS definitely one to listen to and learn from and I wanted top mention his generation while I had a chance.

        Comment


        • Donw
          Donw commented
          Editing a comment
          You all are blessed and my hat is off to you and the rest of your family for realizing how precious our previous generations are to not only who we are, but all that surrounds us. I also think I realize how tough your wife’s father is. My dad and three of my uncles all served in the Pacific during WW2. Nicest but toughest men I have ever known.

        • Cheef
          Cheef commented
          Editing a comment
          I had an Uncle. Rudy Springer. I knew him as a small in size, quiet farmer. Turns out he flew Corsair in the Pacific theater. I still just can't get that to register into mind. He is definitely one I would love to talk to again

        #10
        Many folks I talk to cannot believe that I worked for years with no internet or email. Did not exist. Cut my teeth on Windows 3.1. Everyone looks at me like I am ancient. I am 59 but it really has not been that long ago since we did not have those things...

        Comment


        • 58limited
          58limited commented
          Editing a comment
          To this day, Windows 3.1 is my favorite version.

        • TripleB
          TripleB commented
          Editing a comment
          I tell my kids that I saw the birth of the home computer. We had the Tandy 1000 where memory was recorded on a cassette player and the monitor was a portable TV. The only game was Pong.

        #11
        I can identify with most of your description even though I grew up in the 59s and early 60s in the city. I could especially identify with eating in a restaurant and if there were appliances there were only one of each.

        A friend of mine asked her grandmother to tell her how it was in the “good old day.” Her grandmother responded, “Honey, you are living in the good old days.” Aren’t we all?

        Comment


        • 58limited
          58limited commented
          Editing a comment
          Those who fondly remember the 'Good Old Days' forget what it was like without A/C.

        • Cheef
          Cheef commented
          Editing a comment
          I've tried to think back to what that was like.
          It seems it must have been miserable but I don't recall it being that way at all.
          I believe it was something we were just used to and might have made the occasional Man it's hot comment and just went on with life.

        • 58limited
          58limited commented
          Editing a comment
          I think people were basically acclimated plus work habits were different - at least in rural areas (or maybe just on my uncle's ranch - I think he had the right idea) : Work in the morning until 12noon -1pm, eat lunch, rest until early evening (or putter around indoors fixing things), then back to work until sundown. He didn't have A/C but had lots of fans.
          Last edited by 58limited; October 18, 2020, 12:32 PM.

        #12
        Cheef, This a great thread. Thanks for starting it. I too don't like to think about getting older but the replies here bring back some fond memories. I like to think I'm not THAT old but to put things in perspective I was not quite two years old when the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. Not that that is a memory but that's about when it started.

        As a kid in the mid 50's, in the summer my brother and sister and I together with friends would go tubing on a fair sized creek in the Big Horn Mountains in Wyoming. This involved cold mountain water running from melting snowpack over rocks in the creek bed. We'd wear swimsuits, t-shirts to keep the sun off and canvas tennis shoes (they didn't make them out of anything else back then) which had been our gym shoes the previous school year. The shoes kept our feet more or less protected from the big rocks. The rocks we couldn't see we'd find with other parts of our bodies. We each had an inner tube salvaged from the local tire shop when they were so far gone they couldn't be either hot or cold patched to function reliably in a tire. I don't recall if tubeless tires were available back then but I'm glad old inner tubes were still available.

        Somebody's mother would be waiting two or three miles down stream to pick up us up, usually two or three hours after we got in the water. There were very few rules we had to follow: Don't get out of the creek at the Jones place cuz they don't like kids, especially those who are on their property uninvited; don't get into fights with anyone, especially your sister or brother; and (the only one we took seriously) keep an eye on everyone's fingernails and lips. If they turn blue get out of the water. Considering we were only nine or ten years old then, today that would be considered child neglect.

        All of us could leave the house in the morning, together with the dog, and could be gone all day if we wanted. If we wanted lunch we could either go home at the proper time and get it, go to someone else's house (at the proper time) or go without. Nobody worried unless somebody called parents and reported we were doing something we shouldn't be doing which didn't happen, very often.

        The local creamery would deliver milk in glass bottles (the ones that look like bowling pins with a flat top) which were capped with a piece of thin cardboard. Mom would sometimes get cream which came in a quart can shaped like a 10 gallon milk can. It couldn't be poured. You had to use a spoon.

        Lots of other great memories from those times: My grand mother had an ice box in her kitchen, not a refrigerator but an ice box. The block of ice went into the top compartment, the food went into the lower compartment. I won't say the ice was delivered by a horse and wagon, but it was delivered by a good sized van loaded with blocks of ice covered in sawdust for insulation. The delivery man carried it in to her house with ice tongs. I would open the top compartment for him.

        When I was the ripe old age of about 13 Ma Bell decided that dial phones needed to replace operator assisted calls in our community. Until then I remember lifting the handset off the phone cradle and saying "Operator, please give me (phone number) xxxx? Ma Bell, apparently thinking that none of us had a brain in our head, sent a guy to our Jr. high school assembly to show us all how to dial a telephone. Many of us later became a commander of a US Naval carrier strike group, state judge, US senator, federal court of appeals justice, successful trial lawyers, owners/managers of multimillion dollar corporations and ranches, and everyday successful owners and operators of their family businesses. I know where many of my schoolmates are but, except for one, I don't remember any of us going to jail or prison. But I guess the phone company needed to cover all of their bases.


        There are many more I could bore you with so I won't but I will end this with one of the more amazing things I have ever experienced even though it was after the fact. And this goes to the issue of how rapidly technology moves and may be of interest to any of you who became a licensed pilot prior to 1990. In 1987 I got my private pilot's license, something I had wanted to do for many years. In 1990 I saw an article in a statewide news paper about a man named Clyde Ice who had recently passed away. I did not know him but he was described as the father of both Wyoming and South Dakota aviation with impressive details included in his obituary. At the age of 90 he flew his family around the area including Devil's Tower in NE Wyoming. Shortly afterward he retired from flying.

        A couple of year later my wife and I were visiting her relatives in Wisconsin. Her uncle and I took a day and drove to Oshkosh, Wisconsin to visit the Experimental Aircraft Association, EAA, museum. While I was looking at a display of historical documents related to aviation I found what appeared to be the original of Mr. Clyde Ice's pilots license. It was signed by Orville Wright.

        At least for a little while I had been flying in the same airspace as a pilot who had been licensed by one of the Wright brothers. Thirty years later it still catches my breath.









        Comment


        • Cheef
          Cheef commented
          Editing a comment
          Holy Damnit.
          This thread could become a wealth of information we would never have been part of or heard the least bit about!
          It IS too bad in this day and time with all the ways to broadcast and save and access information that the common person doesn't make use of the resources.
          BUT still hearing it or reading it person to person just trumps a book or manufactured audio lesson.

          Pilots. license signed by one of the wright Brothers!

        #13
        Who of us still calls the remote control a clicker? And who knows why?

        The first remotes had two functions. Volume/power and channel. Both went in a circle, no up/down. Pressing the button actually struck a tuning fork of sorts that put out an ultrasonic frequency and made click noise when pressed. Think of a piezo igniter.

        Comment


        • Donw
          Donw commented
          Editing a comment
          I remember those and taking it apart and experiencing that Bible verse about sparing the rod.😮

        • LA Pork Butt
          LA Pork Butt commented
          Editing a comment
          My in-laws called it a zapper.

        #14
        I have a theory about the good old days. When we went through them they were uncharted territory, but somehow we figured how to negotiate them. So, we look back and think I could do it again. Whenever we face the future it is uncharted territory too, not knowing how we will make it through this new territory we tend to be nostalgic about the good old days. I think the good old days are probably less about the actual events and circumstances and more about the people and relationships associated with them.

        Comment


        • Huskee
          Huskee commented
          Editing a comment
          Well said.

        #15
        Reading through this thread again, and especially the talk of the 'good ol days', I am reminded of one of my all time favorite lyrics. It's from a country song by a briefly popular Andy Griggs from I wanna say early 2000s. "If heaven was a town it would be my town, on a summer day in 1985. When everything I wanted was out there waiting, and everyone I loved was still alive". It hits home with me because in that era both sets of my grandparents were alive & well, my small hometown was still small, and my parents were both young and healthy. We did a lot as extended family, didn't have much but had all we needed, and as kids we took it all for granted. Now it's only those faded memories, photos at mom & dad's, and songs like this that bring it all up. Thank goodness we all have those memories!

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