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Smith & Wollensky

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    Smith & Wollensky

    I am struggling with the credibility of this article. I have eated and S&W several times and I have never tasted anything like this. Anybody have any insight?
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...-steak-at-home

    #2
    Recipe seems very weird. Why would you heat the dry rub before putting on a cold steak that then is cooked? And marinating in all that olive oil? I've been to their restaurants in NYC and Las Vegas several years ago and never saw anything like this. A great steak shouldn't require all this work.

    Comment


    • Meathead
      Meathead commented
      Editing a comment
      Warming spices in oils releases more of their oils/flavors, so that makes sense. But why ALL THE FUSS?

    #3
    I saw another article/recipe/how-they-do-it story about a year or two ago. Again with a marinade of some kind, but I don't recall it being cajun. At the time, I attributed it to stupid clickbait.

    If I wanted to put my tin foil hat on, I'd say it's not in the best interests of executive chefs from high-end restaurants to give away recipes and techniques.

    Comment


      #4
      I guess one has try it & see if ya weren’t hosed or not.

      Comment


      • RonB
        RonB commented
        Editing a comment
        So you just volunteered even though you Don't Give a Rip...

      #5
      It’s a complex recipe for steak. And I’m sort of a purist about steak anyway. Buy prime beef. Salt and pepper. Fire.

      Comment


      • RonB
        RonB commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes. - It's that simple.

      • smokin fool
        smokin fool commented
        Editing a comment
        +3 don't go re-inventing the wheel

      • swartzster
        swartzster commented
        Editing a comment
        I agree

      #6
      Sounds interesting for a home cook, but pretty sure a busy steakhouse would not be using this method.

      Comment


      #7
      The only S&W I'm familiar with tastes of gunpowder. It can, however, bring a steak to its knees, along with the rest of the steer!

      Comment


      • Mr. Bones
        Mr. Bones commented
        Editing a comment
        +1 Click Click Boom

      • ecowper
        ecowper commented
        Editing a comment
        I’m more of a Ruger fella, but not gonna disagree

      • Tax Man
        Tax Man commented
        Editing a comment
        Yeah, to me S&W is guns.

      #8
      They do have a Cajun Rib Eye on their menu . I've never ordered it though. Once I start travelling again I'll visit one and order one , you know, in the pursuit of science. 😎
      Last edited by pkadare; May 24, 2020, 01:02 PM.

      Comment


      • jgreen
        jgreen commented
        Editing a comment
        Same. Happy to compare notes after we try.

      • ecowper
        ecowper commented
        Editing a comment
        Normally when I’m in New York I go to The Palm Too (used to go to The Palm, but it’s permanently closed) .... but I guess I can break my tradition and try out S&W in NYC ... S&W in Boston is my go to there.

      #9
      I’m confused what you all are confused about.

      This is an herb and spice crusted steak colored to perfection ( per every steak, all meat is different right) and finished in the oven for as long as necessary ( we don’t cook by minutes right) for the ticket temp.

      Just like we make a fabulous MMD or BBBR they make a steak rub.

      They also make a flavorful cooking medium for the sear and that’s the oil. I keep a flavored oil on hand always. My choice is garlic confit oil made with thyme, shallot and evoo. See pic below.

      so the screaming hot sear makes it. We do stuff like this all the time in the pit.

      the spice and oil is made in batches. Easy money for a steak house. The cook is the key.


      Click image for larger version  Name:	992CEA39-F22B-4744-A781-2966B331AAEB.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	2.55 MB ID:	851167

      Thant pan above my oil is marinating skirt. Yep, you guessed it. With dry chili, cumin, paprika, gran garlic, gran onion, ground oregano and salt n pepper dry brined then hit with wershire and a spot on maggie. Lastly soaked it in my garlic oil.

      guess I’ll need to post it now.
      Last edited by HouseHomey; May 24, 2020, 04:02 PM.

      Comment


      • fzxdoc
        fzxdoc commented
        Editing a comment
        Yup, you'll need to post that recipe, HouseHomey . Thanks for your insights.

        Kathryn

      #10
      I looked at their menu, it is a specific item under “Classic Dry-aged Cuts”. Myself, I wouldn’t order it. I’d get either the ribeye or the strip (I’m one of those guys who prefers the strip steak), or if I’d just hit big at the tables (we’re in Vegas) I’d get the SRF Swingin’ Tomahawk Ribeye.

      Comment


      • Mr. Bones
        Mr. Bones commented
        Editing a comment
        I prefers th Strip, my dang self.
        Mebbe alla my wirin is all kinda messud up, yall reckon???

      • Mosca
        Mosca commented
        Editing a comment
        Nah. The ribeye cap is fantastic, the eye itself kinda “eh”. The strip is all rich meaty iron-y goodness, from end to end.

        An overdone ribeye is still edible. An overdone strip steak is shoe leather, and should be chopped up and mixed in with the dog’s dinner. I think that’s where people developed their preferences, too many bad strip steaks as a kid.

      #11
      I just bought the cookbook, to support the cause.

      Serving New York: For All the People Who Make NYC Dining Unforgettable E-Cookbook

      Here's the blurb about it:

      Foreword by ROAR co-founder and west~bourne chef + owner Camilla Marcus

      100% of the proceeds from this e-book will go to ROAR (Relief Opportunities for All Restaurants) x Robin Hood’s restaurant relief fund, providing cash assistance to NYC restaurant workers.


      Practically overnight, nearly all of New York City’s 26,000-plus restaurants were forced to close their doors when the coronavirus pandemic shook every industry in the country, leaving millions of restaurant workers without jobs. NYC restaurants are the lifeblood and the backbone of our vibrant, diverse, exciting metropolis. But right now, their future looks uncertain. That’s why this book exists: to support New York City’s finest restaurants and their hard-working teams through one of the most powerful, most unifying languages on Earth: recipes. Inside are more than 45 easy, pantry-friendly recipes from NYC’s best restaurants, including Olmsted, Momofuku, King, Charlie Bird, Llama Inn, the NoMad, and more.


      Kathryn

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