Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Questions About BBQ for My Church

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Questions About BBQ for My Church

    We recently began attending the First United Methodist Church of Lake Wales, FL. We are members of another Methodist church but we like the one in Lake Wales better.

    Anyway, we recently went to a church lunch, called a pot luck dinner. The meat was room temperature fried chicken from Walmart. It was dry, obviously fried in oil that had been used too many times, and tasted terrible. Apparently Walmart fried chicken is the entre at these lunches, paid for by the church. Members bring side dishes.

    So I want to feed them my BBQ baby back ribs and chicken. There are about 100 members who attend these, and probably 75% of them are over 65 years old. I estimate that 20 slabs of ribs and 10 chickens will be plenty of BBQ. I have three water smokers, two Landmann gas smokers and a Backwoods G2 Party. I can easily fit 20 slabs of ribs in the two gas smokers and 10 chickens in the G2 Party. The ribs and chickens are all three hours cooking time, at 275 degrees for the ribs and 300 for the chickens, so they will all be ready at the same time. The church is 30 minutes away, plus there will be about 15 minutes of down time before serving.

    Would it be better to prepare everything the day before, refrigerate it, then take it to the church and heat it up there before serving, or would it be better to take it directly from the smokers to the church? If I take it directly from the smokers to the church, what could I transport it in to keep it warm? I know brisket and pork butt do fine for hours in a covered aluminum pan wrapped in a blanket in a beer cooler. But the slabs of baby backs and the halves of chicken are thinner.

    #2
    When I do ribs for the church, I cook them at the church. When they get done, bring 'em in and consume them.

    I have a Cambro for briskets and butts. Never messed with chicken. My dad and them do big chicken dinners back home. They have aluminum trash cans (new of course) they line with foil, and stack the chickens in that to hold.

    Comment


      #3
      Excellent post, I have the same problem coming up in June. Cooking ribs, butt and beans for a wedding reception for about 100-150 people. I was thinking along the same lines smoking the day before, and then warming everything up back in the smokers. Does anyone see any issues with warming it up? Would that tend to dry out the meat? Any suggestions or input would be appreciated

      Comment


        #4
        Don't know about the ribs, but for the butts and beans I'd use the Ernest method. I'd smoke them in advance and catch any drippings during the smoke. Pull the pork and put in ziplock bags and add some of the drippings before you refrigerate. (If you need to do this several days in advance you can vacuum seal them and freeze.) If you can't catch drippings and the meat is a bit dry, add a bit of apple juice mixed with a splash of cider vinegar and a TBS or so of whatever rub you used. To reheat, fill a large beer cooler with hot water. You can use hot tap water and then add boiling water to get it up to 150 or so and add your meat. (If it's frozen you will want to get your initial temp higher before adding meat.) Monitor the water temp and add boiling water to bring it up to at least 140. You don't want it to drop below 140 for safety reasons. A cooler will keep your meat at an appropriate temp for several hours once you get the meat warmed up to 140. For the beans, after you smoke them, refrigerate and then just reheat them in foil pans at the church and serve. You could also put the beans in a roaster to reheat them at the church.

        Comment


          #5
          In my experience ribs don't reheat well. I love reheated, or even cold, chicken. No worries there IMO. The ribs I would do that day and transport them over wrapped. They will be much better that way than cooked a day before IMO.

          Comment


            #6
            Thanks Guys, that's the information I was looking for! Your probably right I might put a hold on the ribs, save face and embarrassment.

            Comment


              #7
              Pulled pork is a real crowd pleaser and easier to transport... And you can warm it up in a crock pot!

              Comment


              • JeffJ
                JeffJ commented
                Editing a comment
                Yes, what Pit Boss said. I've done pulled pork for a crowd on a number of occasions and it was always a huge hit.

              #8
              This is great info! I'm doing pulled pork and pulled chicken thighs for a company group outing this summer at our house...let's just say our group has grown quite a bit since this tradition started. Burgers and dogs last few years turned into a full day of grilling and not much enjoyment for those on the grills. I am planning pork on the PBC and chicken on the PK (need to do a dry run first). The vegetarians get a grill to themselves -- most likely the Weber gasser. Corn, beans, and slaw round out the main menu, with a bunch of pot luck stuff and deserts. I'll be looking for more advice as I start to freak out toward the end-of-June date.

              Comment

              Announcement

              Collapse
              No announcement yet.
              Working...
              X
              false
              0
              Guest
              500
              ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
              false
              false
              {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
              Yes
              Rubs Promo
              Meat-Up in Memphis