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Experienced smokers, what is a skill would you teach the younger you?

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    Experienced smokers, what is a skill would you teach the younger you?

    There are a lot of experienced people on here, curious what you find important now that would have had a big impact on you early on in your grilling lives.

    Sorry the title was too long and I had to edit. Failed.

    #2
    The same thing I am constantly teaching the old me: temperature control.

    Comment


      #3
      I agree with Dewe....temp control, and to not buy a cheap Brinkman vertical to start (ok maybe more than one). But, in all fairness, they got me to where I am now. From the smallest acorns.......
      Last edited by Gunderich_1; February 25, 2015, 06:36 PM.

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        #4
        Documentation. I'm very much new to smoking, but I have learned to document my cooks (possibly too many details at this point). From my documentation I often later learn where I went wrong or something that can be improved on, or where I got it (mostly) right and can repeat.

        Comment


          #5
          Smoking low and slow is getting so much easier these days with all of the technology being added. I've already taught my 9 year old grandson what temps I want to cook at and how to control my DigiQ to manage the heat. He could damn near do it all by himself. He likes to help me prep a pork butt or a brisket an I make sure to explain every step. He will be a very good smoker operator by the time he is 15.

          Comment


            #6
            Reverse sear

            Comment


            • Breadhead
              Breadhead commented
              Editing a comment
              Good one Doc... That's good imput.

            #7
            Don't marry my ex-wife. After that, patience, patience, and more patience. Let the food guide you, to what you need to do. Don't force it, let it happen.

            Comment


            • _John_
              _John_ commented
              Editing a comment
              I have one of those exes myself, turns out a person with only a partial brain can still live and mostly function. Not sure what that says about me though...

            • Breadhead
              Breadhead commented
              Editing a comment
              Women are great, really. I love them so much I've been married three times. But I learned a lot about prenuptial agreements after the first one. And... There is nothing wrong with forming a personal corporation. Corporation are private entities - they are NOT a party to your marriage.

            #8
            To use high quality digital thermometers and cook to specific internal temperature...

            Comment


              #9
              Sounds good, I guess if I have any I could teach my really new self it would be to get a good temp probe. It is pretty amazing how good you can do with just having the right finishing temps, you can cook in a very wide range of temps and still get decent food if you pull it off at the right time.

              Comment


                #10
                Experience is worth every penny of overcooked/wasted meat. Every minute you tried and either missed the mark by a little or a lot, you gained worthwhile experience. No matter what the cost, with the exception maybe Strat 50's ex, you are who you are now because of what you have gone through.

                Comment


                • Huskee
                  Huskee commented
                  Editing a comment
                  That's a good outlook. Another member here (John, maybe?) had said something similar to 'every time I mess something up I learn one more way NOT to do it.' I totally agree with this perspective. It's like the kid who couldn't toss the baseball up and hit it. Then he told his mom he was the greatest pitcher he knew of.

                #11
                Thick steaks need a digital thermometer and reverse sear for the easiest and best results. Not when they feel like the heel of your hand, or when they've had 6 min per side over "medium-high heat" on your grill.

                Oh, and never EVER attempt to use all 3 gas grill burners on high w/ expensive 2" porterhouses, and allow beverage and fellowship to get you sidetracked.

                Comment


                • CurlingDog
                  CurlingDog commented
                  Editing a comment
                  been there, ate that... just scrap of the burnt bits and find some A1

                • chudzikb
                  chudzikb commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Beer and friends have led to more take out pizza over the years than I care to think about now. Point well made.

                #12
                Use a digital thermometer.

                Note size of period.

                Comment


                • chudzikb
                  chudzikb commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Use a QUALITY digital thermometer.

                  There, fixed it for you.

                • Huskee
                  Huskee commented
                  Editing a comment
                  'I don't need no expensive unnecessary thermometer gadget, my grill has a thermometer on the lid, with both a BBQ and Grill zone, I'll just use that thank you. Plus I know how to feel when my steak is done right, I read it somewhere once. Thermometers are for novices who don't know what they're doing.'

                  [2 weeks later:] 'Wow Red Lobster & Ponderosa's steaks are so much better than mine, I wonder what the secret is to really good steak..?'

                  I hope you noted the sarcasm.
                  Last edited by Huskee; February 26, 2015, 03:36 PM.

                • Gunderich_1
                  Gunderich_1 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Boy Huskee, did YOU hit the nail on the head!!! Well said, sir!

                #13
                Patience

                Comment


                  #14
                  Patience. Good for cooking, good for life.

                  Comment


                    #15
                    I would teach my seven-year-old that Low and Slow is like cooking a perfectly golden marshmallow patiently suspended over a campfire With its gooy goodness cooked all the way through to the center. VS. Hot and Fast by sticking it in the fire and coming out with a charcoal meteorite that's only heated on the surface.

                    Comment


                    • Ray
                      Ray commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Great analogy, Powersmoke! Totally agree....

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