Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Do you reverse sear in the indoor kitchen also?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Do you reverse sear in the indoor kitchen also?

    I apply reverse searing in the indoor kitchen also, in the (rare) event that I cook a steak on the stove. I believe it is superior, for these reasons:
    • Less overshoot of temp (when resting) since the actual sear is performed for a shorter period of time.
    • Way better sear surface on the meat since it is "dried" (kind of) in the oven.
    • Easier to hit your target temp within +-0.5° due to bullet point #1.
    What do you all say? Is it just me, or do you apply the same technique in your regular kitchen?

    NOTE I: the way I do this is I put the steak in the oven at 120° C / 250° F with a thermometer. When it is within 10° from the target temp, I sear it in the frying pan.

    NOTE II: Another great way to get the perfect sear surface (grill or no grill) is to let your steak rest uncovered in the fridge for a day. This dry ages it, albeit a very short time, but gives you the best possible prerequisites.
    17
    Yes, of course. Thanks to AR I have seen the light!
    88.24%
    15
    Uh...no, that's a different ball game.
    0.00%
    0
    Didn't know you could. Can you?
    11.76%
    2
    Last edited by Henrik; December 12, 2014, 08:00 AM. Reason: Made votes public

    #2
    For sure, my wife is fully converted, she will not let us do anything not reverse seared now!

    Comment


      #3
      I actually prefer an indoor steak.
      salted 2 days in advance, wrapped first 24 hours. Then left on a rack uncovered a night before.
      It goes in a 225 degrees oven until about 10 degrees shy of target temp. That surface is so dry at this stage that it pretty much forms a crust as soon as it hits the hot skillet.
      Heat a cast iron skillet, infused some ghee with garlic and thyme and sear!!

      Comment


      • Henrik
        Henrik commented
        Editing a comment
        Sweet! And the ghee with garlic and thyme on top of that? Epic win!

      • HC in SC
        HC in SC commented
        Editing a comment
        Never heard of this. Thanks homie. The infusing part has the gears spinning in my brain!

      #4
      I love ghee!! I make my own.

      Comment


        #5
        I make my own ghee as well and use it just like you do for your steaks, Ernest, although I heat a cast iron griddle on my gasser to warp temp and sear the steaks on that. Less kitchen cleanup that way. I use ghee for most of my pan frying too. It's good stuff.

        Kathryn

        Comment


        #6
        I am amazed at what I learn on here! If not from the content or the moderators, then from all the great members. Today it was 2 things...what ghee is and how to make it and that I CAN do steak in the oven. I thought that would dry it out and make it tough. Can't wait to try it! This site has made cooking fun again. Thanks everyone.

        Comment


        • David Parrish
          David Parrish commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks OTR.

        #7
        What is an "indoor kitchen". lol

        Comment


          #8
          approx how long do I leave steak in 225 oven til it hits target temp. Will use thermometer but need some idea of the cook time.

          Comment


          • Ernest
            Ernest commented
            Editing a comment
            Depends on thickness of your steak. Anywhere from 45 minutes to 1 hour thirty minutes. I had a 2 pounder, about 2 inches thick that took about 2 hours.

          • David Parrish
            David Parrish commented
            Editing a comment
            Ernest is on point. Thickness is a big factor. 45 minutes is about right for a 1.5 incher. I had a big 2+ inch steak take 2 hours. Same as Ernest.

          #9
          I'm all about bark.

          On the oven, the ribeye gets seasoning on each side. Heat up some olive oil on high until it starts to smoke, then I turn it down to medium. Drop the steak on, enough time on each side to get me to 130 internal.

          Comment


            #10
            Indoors I use a sous vide to bring the steak to about 120, then finish it on a glowing cast iron skillet.

            Comment


            • Mosca
              Mosca commented
              Editing a comment
              No problem. I got it from http://www.sousvidesupreme.com. I got the Demi, the smaller one. I'm pretty sure it was on sale, because I was going to get the Anova immersion stick, but got the oven instead because a vacuum sealer and two boxes of pouches were included. It was over a year ago, I'm going to guess I paid somewhere around $299. The downside of the Demi oven is that even though it's the smaller oven, it takes up a lot of counter space. But it performs flawlessly. It's a well thought out device. If you would rather have the space, I have friends who have the Anova, and it works well too. I will say, though, I don't sous vide more than a handful of times a year, my life is not such that I can start Sunday's dinner Thursday. But for steaks, chops, chicken, turkey breast, stuff like that, it is crackin'.

            • Mosca
              Mosca commented
              Editing a comment
              Just looked it up, I paid $329 and the free sealer and bags were the "sale" part.

            • Dewesq55
              Dewesq55 commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks for the info. I already have the vacuum Foodsaver, so I am thinking about the Anova.

            #11
            The Meathead procedure is too much work. Just put the butter in a heavy bottomed pan, leave it on low and let it go until the solids caramilize. You'll smell it when it's ready.

            Here's mine going, using Kerrygold butter (found it on sale and I wiped out the shelves). Use a coffee filter to strain it into a heated glass jar (hot jar prevents condensation when the hot ghee hits a cold jar ~ broscience)
            I use ghee about 99.9% of the time.

            Last edited by Ernest; December 14, 2014, 09:52 PM.

            Comment


            • ontheranch
              ontheranch commented
              Editing a comment
              on point again, Ernest! Sooo easy. Cooked mine on low until the crackling subsided and it smelled like I thought it should. Perfect

            #12
            Did first steak last night in oven...took a bit longer than anticipated even tho it's what you all call a "skinny Steak" 1" thick.
            Brushed it with ghee infused with garlic and thyme ( a la Ernest), then hit the warp 10 cast iron skillet and set off the durn fire alarms! The steak was outstanding, background music not so much.

            Comment


            • Huskee
              Huskee commented
              Editing a comment
              Me too on the lol. In my friend's house when I was growing up the fire alarm was the dinner bell. My mom was thankfully a better cook. Sometimes you just can't help it though.

            • fzxdoc
              fzxdoc commented
              Editing a comment
              That's why I do the searing part of the reverse sear on my gasser with a smokin' hot cast iron griddle. No smoke alarms outside.

              I bet those steaks were awesome, OTR.

              Kathryn

            • ontheranch
              ontheranch commented
              Editing a comment
              Kathryn, good plan. Dunno why I didn't think to do that...(blonde moment?) And I have GrillGrates, aren't they supposed to make a great griddle when flipped over? Will try it on my Xmas rib roast. Thanks for the wake-up call. Happy Holiday!

            #13
            I'm a huge fan of the reverse sear method... and while I prefer doing this on my Weber Kettle over coal... the oven and a hot cast iron skillet turn out some amazing steaks.

            I can't say enough good things about the reverse sear which I learned about on this site. The quality of my steaks have really improved with this method... matter of fact we seldom order steaks when at a restaurant anymore, because we are often disappointed in the steak when compared to what comes off of my grill.

            Comment


            • ontheranch
              ontheranch commented
              Editing a comment
              Right you are, Hondo! This site is one huge culinary academy and like you I'm learning so much. It has really upped my game.

            • The Burn
              The Burn commented
              Editing a comment
              Yeah, I was thinking the other night that the Restaurant Association should be boycotting AR since I'm eat out a lot less now. My steaks are as good or better as any restaurant, my wings are better, my fajitas are better, etc.

            • richinlbrg
              richinlbrg commented
              Editing a comment
              It has been well over a decade since I had a steak in a restaurant. I'm just too particular about my steaks, so I'll have something I don't cook.

            #14
            I do it with chicken breasts. America's Test Kitchen has this similar technique for indoor cooking things other than steaks. (Sorry, but my steaks don't get cooked inside as long as I'm alive!) But sometimes a good ol' stovetop skillet makes some mean meals!

            Comment


              #15
              I have a confession: I usually do the sear part of the reverse seared steak in a frying pan on the stovetop. Every time I try it on the grill, I discover I don't have it hot enough to give me a good crust, or flare-ups char my meat

              Comment


              • _Keith
                _Keith commented
                Editing a comment
                I've thought about that, but how is that really any different than tossing it in the frying pan, other than I get to say I used the grill? And how does that help the "not hot enough" issue?

              • Papa Bob
                Papa Bob commented
                Editing a comment
                Keith, if you get a foil pan to put your coals in, instead of just putting them spread out in your grill and put it closer to the grill grates it concentrates the heat and you get a real nice sear, great for skirt steaks also 1 1/2 min per side great crust and shrimp do great hot and fast

              • _Keith
                _Keith commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks, but that still leaves the "how are the results of this any different than putting it in a frying pan?" part of the question. Because I already own a frying pan, so if the results aren't much different, I don't see the point of spending the money on GrillGrates

            Announcement

            Collapse
            No announcement yet.
            Working...
            X
            false
            0
            Guest
            500
            ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
            false
            false
            {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
            Yes
            Rubs Promo
            Meat-Up in Memphis