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Cooking brisket and shoulder simultaneously

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    Cooking brisket and shoulder simultaneously

    Hey dudes, need a little advice here. This weekend I'm hosting a party for my son's football team. We're looking at about 50-60 guests total, about 14-20 of which are kids. I'm going to do a pork shoulder and a brisket. I'm thinking about 15 pounds of each.

    Questions:

    1. Is that enough meat, in your opinion? I haven't bought anything yet.
    2. Do both cuts need the same cooking time? Should I start the pork earlier?
    3. I'm used to doing 10 pound shoulders for about 13 hours @ 220. I'd like to keep cook time the same so what do you think? 250?
    4. Plan is to have the meat done early and put it in aluminum trays. Would it be better to finish either meat in my oven and use the tray as a crutch?
    5. My kamado isn't big enough to give two large cuts of meat their own property. Would you cook beef on top of pork or pork on top of beef?

    Any other thoughts on cooking these two cuts simultaneously?

    #2
    Welcome back Cheesefood, been a while! Whatcha been up to?

    1. It's a safe estimate to plan on 20% loss with trimming and shrinking from cooking, and plan 1/2lb finished meat weight each person, with some leftovers hopefully. With many of them being kids that should be safe, but it might be pretty slim if you do have 60 people. If your brisket weighs 15lbs pre-trimming you may end up with only a ~10lber after trimming & cooking. If there are plenty of sides you might be ok. Sure wouldn't hurt to get an extra 10lbs of pork to be safe, leftovers will be claimed quickly or you can keep them all. Better that than 3 lbs too little you know?

    2. If you leave your pork butt whole, plan on 1 - 1.25hrs per lb is a good time estimate, but remember it's just an estimate. You always cook to temp and it's rarely a perfect science.

    3. Big hunks of meat like those can easily handle 250*.

    4. Pork butt surely, if it's in a tray and covered tightly with foil and a little liquid, it will braise and soften it to a pullable point much better that way. Brisket, you usually want that sliceable not shreddable. I've held brisket for hours before at 160-170 but it does get pot roasty and overly tender.

    5. Good question. I'm not sure there's a wrong way there. You just have to worry about the different rubs you use on one vs the other, getting on the other. I'd personally opt for beef dripping on pork, but that's a 'I've never done it' guess on my part. I use sugary rubs on pork, which probably wouldn't fare as well on beef, but the peppery rub I use on beef (BBBR) would probably be pretty good on pork. There might not be enough to mater, but there might be you just don't know until you do it.
    Last edited by Huskee; October 20, 2014, 11:38 AM.

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      #3
      Might want to go beef on top. Since the drippings from the pork might/will over whelm the beef. Which ain't bad in my opinion, but reduces the "variety special" you are going for.

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