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Dry Brining... Wrap or no wrap?

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    Dry Brining... Wrap or no wrap?

    When dry brining ahead of time, 12-24 hours in advance, do you keep the meat in the fridge covered or not covered? Does it matter? And does it differ with different meats?

    #2
    I don't know if its right or wrong, but I have had great results wrapping mine in plastic wrap, no matter what type of meat.

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      #3
      I think MH recommends unwrapped and preferably raised on a wire rack over a pan. I'm on my phone so i can't look it up, but I believe it has something to do with air exposure and better crust. I dry brine uncovered and it works great, but there are no rules in the kitchen.

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        #4
        From the article on dry brining:

        Sprinkle a little more on thick parts like the breasts on a turkey. Leave the meat uncovered on a rack in a pan. This is especially important for poultry because we want the skin to dry out a bit. Just be careful that vegetables and other raw foods do not come in contact with raw meat. And don't rinse it off before cooking. After a few hours most of it has gone in and is well past the surface anyhow.

        http://amazingribs.com/recipes/rubs_...y_brining.html

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        • Virginia Dave
          Virginia Dave commented
          Editing a comment
          From the same article:

          Here's a rule of thumb: Sprinkle about 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt per pound of trimmed meat. It 's a bit hard to measure so here's how I do it. I use kosher salt which is a larger flake than table salt and it still dissolves easily on the moist meat. Don't use large grain salts like sea salt. They won't dissolve easily. I sprinkle from about 8" above so it is evenly distributed. Do not oversalt, especially on burgers, where too much salt will gel the meat proteins and make for a dense patty. Then back in the fridge. Put it on a wire rack in a pan in the fridge so air will surround the meat. After as little as an hour or two, you're ready to cook. No need to rinse the meat, all the salt gets sucked in.

          For roasts
          For bigger cuts of meat like prime rib, the same ratio, about 1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt per pound of meat. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate overnight or for up to 2 days.

        #5
        It depends on the meat. Beef I leave unwrapped, for that semi dry aged effect. Pork butt or ribs, wrapped with the rub on.
        For whole chicken, I prefer dry brining for a minimum of 48 hours. Wrapped for the first 24 hours. My thinking is if dry brining pulls in surface moisture then wrapping will guarantee that none of the moisture is lost (bro-science).

        I accidentally dry brined a chicken for 3 days and it turned out to be one of the best chickens I've a cooked.

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          #6
          Good advice above. It depends on what your goal is. The wrapping has little if any effect on the salt migration. If you're storing a piece of meat in the fridge w/o dry brining, would you wrap it in plastic wrap, or leave it open to air dry some? Do the same while dry brining. Many people, myself included, will leave chicken unwrapped to dry the skin a bit more. I wrap pork and beef, just because.

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