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Smoke Scrubber For Traeger?

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  • zzdocxx
    commented on 's reply
    Yes indeed it worked great ! There's a big umbrella tree back there that partially overhangs. Next time I'll bring the grill a bit more out from under so the smoke doesn't hang up in the tree.

    Fantastic and simple solution. I shot a few seconds of video but unable to post vid here, far as I can see.

    haha, there is the new Silverton, assembled with the cover on, in the background. I will need to spend some time seasoning and then wrangling with the wifire setup.

  • IowaGirl
    commented on 's reply
    MacGyver-ing at its best! Did it work as well as you hoped it would?

  • zzdocxx
    replied
    Originally posted by IowaGirl View Post
    I used to work in a wastewater treatment plant where we also ran an incinerator, so I'm a bit familiar with odor problems.

    I honestly doubt a shop vac or cyclone separator can effectively remove smoke smell, unless you get a system that's able to remove gases as well as extremely small particulates. Smoke particles that are visible are around 10 microns or larger, but smoke is also composed of much smaller particles invisible to the eye as well as gases. They all can have an odor and the gases and really small particulates are tough to remove.

    A water scrubber is probably going to be more effective than a vac or cyclone. Another possibility is simple dilution and redirection of the smoke leaving your cooker. You want to drive the smoke upward and dilute it -- that might work well enough to minimize the odor near ground level where people's noses are. That's the reason why power plants that burn coal have these hugely tall smokestacks.

    Use a large shop fan blowing clean air and direct the flow upwards at the smoke from the cooker. The airflow from the fan will dilute the smoke and the force of the airflow will drive the smoke higher up. Both things will reduce the chance of odor issues nearer ground level. Be careful the airflow from the fan isn't creating suction near the smokestack, however, because that will change the airflow through the cooker.
    Hope this is the right pic.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • zzdocxx
    commented on 's reply
    Dewey "Pigmeat" Markham:

    https://youtu.be/NRS62nccwmw

    Hmmm any way to embed this ?
    Yup, jus become a Master at BBCODE LOL.

    actual example + square bracket Uncle Roger Lima=httrp(S) baleh de blah wtf ever] link ya was wantin to post[/Unruly Roger Loses.]
    Try it out. pm me if ya git stumped.
    Last edited by Mr. Bones; July 4, 2020, 10:24 PM.

  • dubob
    commented on 's reply
    The hell you say! 😁

  • Mr. Bones
    replied
    "Here comes Th Silverton"... LOL!
    Yeah, I know I'm both old, an very Weird.

    Leave a comment:


  • zzdocxx
    replied
    Originally posted by IowaGirl View Post
    I used to work in a wastewater treatment plant where we also ran an incinerator, so I'm a bit familiar with odor problems.

    I honestly doubt a shop vac or cyclone separator can effectively remove smoke smell, unless you get a system that's able to remove gases as well as extremely small particulates. Smoke particles that are visible are around 10 microns or larger, but smoke is also composed of much smaller particles invisible to the eye as well as gases. They all can have an odor and the gases and really small particulates are tough to remove.

    A water scrubber is probably going to be more effective than a vac or cyclone. Another possibility is simple dilution and redirection of the smoke leaving your cooker. You want to drive the smoke upward and dilute it -- that might work well enough to minimize the odor near ground level where people's noses are. That's the reason why power plants that burn coal have these hugely tall smokestacks.

    Use a large shop fan blowing clean air and direct the flow upwards at the smoke from the cooker. The airflow from the fan will dilute the smoke and the force of the airflow will drive the smoke higher up. Both things will reduce the chance of odor issues nearer ground level. Be careful the airflow from the fan isn't creating suction near the smokestack, however, because that will change the airflow through the cooker.
    Genius idea, I've got a new floor fan and I think I'll give it a try.

    On another note, I totally get it about not wanting to draft air through the smoker grill, I had been think more of a hood type smoke catcher .

    But I like this idea of blowing it straight up the best. Probably I'll point it into the wind off the ocean, and up over a bit toward the neighbors to the downhill side.

    You guys are awesome.

    Hoping to pick up a new Silverton 620 this weekend, just a matter of logistics. I hope setting up the wifire doesn't take all day.

    Leave a comment:


  • klflowers
    replied
    I have lived a lot of places and never had anyone complain, and I have generated lots of smoke at times. I wouldn't worry about it. Lay a shotgun on the deck next to the smoker...

    Leave a comment:


  • klflowers
    commented on 's reply
    Or TN - sometimes in the summer all you can smell is sweet Q smoke.

  • Troutman
    replied
    Just shove a smoked chicken leg in their complaining mouths and that will take care of it

    Leave a comment:


  • rickgregory
    replied
    I simply wouldn't worry unless someone complained. Life has too many actual problems to make one up and then worry about how to fix it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Bones
    commented on 's reply
    Haha, they probly knocked til it likedta breaked yer door down, Brother, an ya jus couldn't hear em, over th dang dang shop vacs lol!

  • jfmorris
    commented on 's reply
    Mr. Bones - exactly! I had to run 2 shop vac's overnight when I was putting a new liner in the pool about 5 years ago, to suck the vinyl liner down to the poolcrete and walls, and worried about the noise I was producing, but no one came knocking...

  • Mr. Bones
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks, Jim!
    I was gonna mention that I'd much rather smell my neighbour's BBQ smoke, than listen to a screamin shop vac, fer more than a moment or two...
    Last edited by Mr. Bones; June 30, 2020, 09:42 AM. Reason: ficksed a tipoe

  • jfmorris
    replied
    Yeah, I see where this is going - zzdocxx has probably seen some of these articles about some of the loony lawsuits like that one in Australia a year or two ago, where folks sued neighbors for letting smoke from a grill waft across the property line. Or in California where a jogger complained that folks should only be grilling veggies, and they were running through a neighborhood they didn't even live in.

    First - if this happens to you - its a sure fire sign you live in the wrong neighborhood, and need to move somewhere better! Try Alabama or Texas.

    Second - the smoke profile from pellet cookers is soooooo light compared to about any other smoker out there, that I seriously doubt it will be an issue, ever. It's much lighter than the smoke from a charcoal or wood smoker.

    Third - if you were to try a scrubber, it cannot be attached directly to the smoker, as that would cause suction and increase airflow, screwing up smoker operation, maybe increasing the temperature of the fire, and all sorts of things. You need to think more like a vented hood over your stove in the house, where its catching most of the smoke, but is not directly attached. And to be honest, I think your neighbors will complain more about the sound of a shop vac running for 18 hours than they will smelling a light aroma of smoke and cooking meat.

    Just my 2 or 3 cents - take it for what its worth!

    Jim
    Last edited by jfmorris; June 30, 2020, 09:06 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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