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Glitchy's MAK 2 Star First (cooking) Impressions

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  • ItsAllGoneToTheDogs
    commented on 's reply
    if you buy on Big Poppa Smokers, don't buy the cover or any accessories (assuming you buy the SS and the front shelf there), once it ships you will have points which should be substantial and pay for the cover and part of another accessory.

  • glitchy
    commented on 's reply
    I don’t think there’s much left to buy with SS 2 star, you get all the grates you can use. Unless you want sear grate or griddle. I guess that depends on if you’re looking to possibly replace the Lynx.

  • Midway
    replied
    Originally posted by glitchy View Post

    Midway The blank pan is all about indirect and easier cleanup. You just need to visit their site and look at the pics. The ‘dimples’ are holes that let heat up across the whole grilling surface. With the covers on the standard grill zone pan, I really didn’t notice much performance difference between it and the blank pan.

    ‘Grilling’ on the MAK is subjective, a lot of people think it works great. I’m still somewhat undecided yet. It’s good for many things, it’s just not going to sear like your LYNX. I’m waiting on a MAK sear grate yet to see what I think with that. I’ve been happy with burgers and sausages using the flame zone with the standard grates, just not steaks.

    To me, a griddle is a griddle and about the same as a cast iron pan. The differences I see are heat retention and grease drainage. Lack of any grease draining is the drawback of the MAK griddle. Heat retention is pretty good, not as good as cast iron, but seems OK. It’s worked very well when I use it, but 4 smash burgers is about all you can really comfortably do in the 1/2 griddle at least with the tools I have.
    Looking at pictures I see the standard dimpled FlameZone pan and a pair of additional pieces to cover the dimples with in order to get a more indirect heat. I can see where the blank pan would be easier to clean even when the dimples are covered. I'm also thinking if you put foil down over the standard cover with dimple covers on, not sure what they are called, that could simplify cleaning. I'm all about making things as easy to clean as possible and still deciding which accessories to add to an order I hope to place by Monday. For now I'm set on the all SS two star with front shelf and cover. Next under consideration are the grill grates. Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • glitchy
    replied
    Originally posted by Midway View Post
    glitchy You mentioned ordering the Blank FlameZone Pan and I'm trying to understand it. I assume the main advantage is easier cleanup. Does it function identically to the standard FlameZone Pan or does the blank distribute or handle heat differently than the one with dimples? You mentioned the standard pan is better for grilling so it must offer a more direct heat? If cleanup is the only difference, why have the dimpled option at all?

    I have a high quality LYNX Stainless Steel Griddle I've used with my LYNX Propane grill. Different than the aluminum hard anodized finish offered by MAK. I wonder how it would compare to the MAK Griddle and a cast Iron pan?

    Thanks.
    Midway The blank pan is all about indirect and easier cleanup. You just need to visit their site and look at the pics. The ‘dimples’ are holes that let heat up across the whole grilling surface. With the covers on the standard grill zone pan, I really didn’t notice much performance difference between it and the blank pan.

    ‘Grilling’ on the MAK is subjective, a lot of people think it works great. I’m still somewhat undecided yet. It’s good for many things, it’s just not going to sear like your LYNX. I’m waiting on a MAK sear grate yet to see what I think with that. I’ve been happy with burgers and sausages using the flame zone with the standard grates, just not steaks.

    To me, a griddle is a griddle and about the same as a cast iron pan. The differences I see are heat retention and grease drainage. Lack of any grease draining is the drawback of the MAK griddle. Heat retention is pretty good, not as good as cast iron, but seems OK. It’s worked very well when I use it, but 4 smash burgers is about all you can really comfortably do in the 1/2 griddle at least with the tools I have.

    Leave a comment:


  • Midway
    replied
    glitchy You mentioned ordering the Blank FlameZone Pan and I'm trying to understand it. I assume the main advantage is easier cleanup. Does it function identically to the standard FlameZone Pan or does the blank distribute or handle heat differently than the one with dimples? You mentioned the standard pan is better for grilling so it must offer a more direct heat? If cleanup is the only difference, why have the dimpled option at all?

    I have a high quality LYNX Stainless Steel Griddle I've used with my LYNX Propane grill. Different than the aluminum hard anodized finish offered by MAK. I wonder how it would compare to the MAK Griddle and a cast Iron pan?

    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • glitchy
    commented on 's reply
    CookinPellets are great, they’re my favorite. They do 100% hickory and they usually have less dust in their bags and burn cleaner than other pellets as they don’t use bark in their pellets. The MAK is working great and cooks well. Just ordered a sear grate and front shelf during the accessory sale.

  • zero_credit
    replied
    How goes the new MAK buddy?

    I have been meaning to ask if you have ever used Cookin Pellets? Any thoughts?

    Leave a comment:


  • 70monte
    commented on 's reply
    Sometimes the convenience would be nice but I'm retired so I have plenty of time to use the other cookers I have so if I don't feel like making the effort, it's just me being lazy. I guess I don't like having to rely on electricity or possible mechanical issues when I'm doing a long cook so I have not talked myself into a pellet cooker yet. Maybe some day.

  • glitchy
    commented on 's reply
    Pellet grills are first about convenience, if you don’t mind the effort with the M1 or others, than you might not love it. From what I’ve seen the MAK produces towards the top of the pellet spectrum, but that caps about a WSCG with 3-4 decent chunks of smokin wood if that makes sense. Until recently, I never had the time for that much fire management, so I fell in love with the convenience.

  • 70monte
    commented on 's reply
    I have had meat smoked on a couple of different pellet grills and the food did not have the same level of smoke that I get with my charcoal cookers so I wasn't overly impressed. Not saying the food off of the MAK would be the same. Even though I have bought two grills off of him, I don't know if he would let me cook on it before hand. He is a pretty busy guy. The lifetime warranty would be nice but I also gave that up on the M1 that I bought from him so I guess I could live without it.

  • ItsAllGoneToTheDogs
    commented on 's reply
    I've had a few incidents, but they were always user error or bad pellets. MAK is insanely quick to help you out, I don't know how many times they've called me or sent me schematics or trouble shooting stuff just because I asked a random question on facebook. Also seen them do the same for owners of second hand MAKs, they don't have to stand by their product when it's been re-sold but they usually go above and beyond.

  • glitchy
    commented on 's reply
    Also, I've had absolutely zero issues since I emptied the bag of petrified logs that unluckily came with the grill from the hopper. I think rwalters, GolfGeezer, and ItsAllGoneToTheDogs and a few others here would have a lot longer with theirs to attest to their reliability. In about a decade of pellet use, I've never had a bad bag that caused jams before either, so it was a total fluke.

  • ItsAllGoneToTheDogs
    commented on 's reply
    I assume he lives nearish to you, if so you already have a business relationship so it might be worth asking to cook something like chicken breast to sample the smoke profile from a pellet grill.

  • glitchy
    commented on 's reply
    I saw that post on the FB group. That's a good price on an essentially new cooker. I actually just got the blank flame zone pan and think I'm going to love that. MAKs are not cheap. However, seeing as many pellet grills as I have I don't think it's way overpriced either in comparison to others quality wise. Biggest 2 things would be will you be happy with smoke profile (MAK smoke output is great for pellet grill smoke output) and is the lifetime warranty worth the price difference to you?

  • 70monte
    replied
    Nice update. The guy that I bought my M1 from is selling his 2 star that he has only cooked on four times. His has the full upper shelf, the cover, and I think he said a flat flame zone. I'm still not convinced that a pellet grill is for me. He still wants $2,650 for it. He paid a little over $3,500 with the upgrades.

    Leave a comment:

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