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Starting on stick burning this weekend

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  • Huskee
    commented on 's reply
    That's what I do too, keep the water closer to the heat instead of directly under the meat.

  • dprice
    commented on 's reply
    I have an old Magnalite 3 quart saucepan (with no handle) that I put directly above the fire, instead of under the meat, with water. It's all smokey and nasty, but it does a great job of humidifying the cooking chamber and moderating the heat. When I open the cooker, it's simmering perfectly.

  • Huskee
    commented on 's reply
    Good plan dprice. I too use a sep bowl, similar in size to my Smokey Joe, to preburn my logs. When they get black and start getting the white ember specs, I move them to my old cabinet smoker and keep it sealed up so they stop burning. Then I have a stash of pre-burnt logs ready to go.

    Do you use a water pan since your heat is in the same chamber as your meat? This could help you to buffer some direct heat and keep humidity in there as well. Just a thought.

  • dprice
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks. I've got a Smokey Joe that I'm going to use as a fire box to avoid putting fresh wood directly on the grill.

    My thought is that I'm going to put the meat on when the temp stabilizes. After all, I've used white smoke for years for the first hour or so, using wood pieces on charcoal. It shouldn't be too much (he said, crossing his fingers!).

    Another thing -- watching a smoky wood fire on my grill let me know just how leaky that thing is! I ordered gaskets today. Considering how well it holds heat, if I make it more airtight, I may be able to maintain cooking temp with 3 or 4 charcoals!

  • Huskee
    commented on 's reply
    [Buddum tissss]

    I'm anxious try pear and grapevine, those are my next choices.

  • Huskee
    commented on 's reply
    I don't wait that long most times, it's ideal but not an absolute necessity my book. It's definitely a bit lighter flavored to use thin blue and the white grey can get strong, but won't ruin things if minimal. I would avoid throwing fresh wood on through the whole cook if doing logs, that's just a bad habit to get into.

  • dprice
    replied
    Calibrated the pit last night, and I learned some things, and I have a question.

    First, since the fire is in the same chamber as the food on my cooker, I don't need a lot of wood to generate heat. I'm planning on two 12-inch splits for direct cooking, and 1 12-inch split (with one in the fire box) for indirect.

    Second, it was an hour and a half into the burn before I got blue smoke. Do y'all wait that long to put the meat on for low and slow, or do you start it before then?
    Last edited by dprice; August 2, 2014, 11:30 AM.

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  • Pit Master Apprentice
    replied
    Glad I checked out this thread. I'm going to FruitaWoodChunks.com right now to see what they have. I'm curious to try different wood than is readily available around my neck of the...woods.

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  • David Parrish
    commented on 's reply
    I'll have to run down some Peach chunks. May order them from the fruitawood folks.

  • Huskee
    commented on 's reply
    I though I responded to this but I don't see it here. Peach, I love it. Apricot is very very similar. The smell is like incense when burning, it's awesome. I tend to use more apple since I have lots, but I'd use peach if I had more access to it.

  • dprice
    replied
    I can already vouch for Meathead's assertion that locality matters more than species with respect to wood. The pecan I got from Fruitawood (in Colorado) smells nothing like the pecan I get out of my back yard in Baton Rouge. It doesn't smell bad at all, but it's definitely different. Something to keep in mind going forward ....

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  • Huskee
    commented on 's reply
    I've done boneless/skinless chick boobs via the reverse sear method and probes left in. Dry brined, turned out excellent, juicy! Sliced them for smoked fajitas since they were ragged pieces to start with. I used oak and didn't prefer it on chicken but I think pecan will be very good. Bone-in breasts will be even easier like Dave says. I've pulled breasts at 165-170 and they were still juicy, but like Dave says don't go much over 160 for best results.

    If you were to do bone-in chick pieces I recommend a wet brine. 1 gallon water, 1 C salt, 1 C sugar, 1 hour. If you're doing small amounts, cut the brine in half (1/2 gal, 1/2C salt, 1/2C sugar) but still go an hour. Pat dry thoroughly, and lightly coat skin with oil and pepper. You can omit the sugar but I think it makes smoked chicken go from good to incredible.

  • dprice
    commented on 's reply
    I'll poll the consumers!

  • David Parrish
    commented on 's reply
    It's a relatively short cook, though, so you could always throw burgers on if the chicken didn't turn out.

  • dprice
    commented on 's reply
    Yeah, but chicken breasts in the first run-through with a stickburner? Makes me a little nervous!

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