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Still can't get Smoke through all my Ribs.

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    Still can't get Smoke through all my Ribs.

    Had the same problem with all the smokers I've used, The thick part of the ribs turns nice and dark pink with the brown center, But the thin part turns either white or slightly pink with the white center. I've gotten the thin part of the ribs to change color before, so I know it can be done, but I can never do it consistently. I know I need to keep them under 140 longer, but man the KBQ gets them above 140 fast. If anyone getting the smoke ring on the thin part of the ribs I'd like to know your methods.

    #2
    Decreasing the temp and longer cooking time, maybe? You didn't elaborate on your cook temp or time, so with the info you gave, that sounds to be the culprit. Having said that, I don't stress about smoke rings, as long as the ribs taste good.

    Comment


    • WhiteSmokeExpert
      WhiteSmokeExpert commented
      Editing a comment
      Well, the KBQ doesn't like to run at a precise temp, Obvisioly if I could keep it at 225 this probably wouldn't be a problem, but I had it where it was only peaking at 234 the other day, but it still cooked em too fast. I don't like white rib meat, the texture is crummy, and the flavor is not as good.

    • Strat50
      Strat50 commented
      Editing a comment
      My gear frequently overshoots temps too(gaskets, I'm working on it...), and I don't see that issue.So, maybe it's a moisture thing?

    #3
    Are you starting with the ribs really cold? Do you use a water pan?

    Smoke will adhere best when the ribs are cold and moist. You might even want to use a spritz of water as you apply the final rub to help it adhere and have moisture right on the surface just as they go into the cooker.

    Comment


      #4
      Jeremy Yoder (aka Mad Scientist BBQ) suggests that using just kosher salt & coarse ground pepper allows for maximum smoke penetration. His theory is that rubs with fine ingredients create a barrier that makes if tough for the smoke to penetrate, I plan to try this out soon with 2 racks of ribs. One with just kosher salt & coarse ground pepper, the other with a standard rub.

      Comment


      • efincoop
        efincoop commented
        Editing a comment
        Chiller Phil I have read the reference article and I'm just not seeing anything that disputes Jeremy's theory. I may very well be missing it, but the closest reference I found was in the Smoke & Food section "When smoke particles approach the meat’s surface, they follow that boundary layer around the food. Very few ever touch down.....So using a spice rub not only adds flavor, but it helps break up the boundary layer."

      • Chiller Phil
        Chiller Phil commented
        Editing a comment
        Meathead stated' "using a spice rub not only adds flavor, but it helps break up the boundary layer."
        I contend, this "Increases" the probability of smoke particles attaching to the surface of the food.
        Decreasing the amount of the spice rub "decreases" the probability.
        The rub increases the surface area, thus increasing turbulence of the boundary layer and in turn increases the probability of not only smoke particles encountering the foods surface, but also convection heat energy.

      • efincoop
        efincoop commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks for your feedback Chiller Phil. I plan to experiment with both style to see if there is a noticeable difference. Okay really its just another excuse to cook ribs!

      #5
      WhiteSmokeExpert if I understand your post correctly you are concerned about no smoke ring in the thinner parts of the rib. This is a cosmetic thing and does not affect flavor. However if you wish to achieve it you should put your ribs in the freezer for 30 minutes prior to cooking and then put them directly in to your smoker from the freezer. This should get you what you are looking for.

      Comment


      • WhiteSmokeExpert
        WhiteSmokeExpert commented
        Editing a comment
        When, the meat's white it has a tougher texture to it. Thx for the advice however, I'll try the freezer. That sounds like a great idea.

      • lostclusters
        lostclusters commented
        Editing a comment
        From what you just said I do not think I addressed your concern. Now it seems that what are are describing is loin meat in your ribs WhiteSmokeExpert

      #6
      I am not saying to do this, but adding a little curing/pink salt to your rub may enhance the smoke ring.
      Also sounds like something may be blocking the smoke, perhaps a layer of fat?
      Is it pork or beef ribs?
      And if all else fails, red food coloring, but you didn't hear that from me.

      Comment


      • efincoop
        efincoop commented
        Editing a comment
        If you don't care to use curing salt Harry Soo recommends adding celery seed to your rub. I have done this in the past and it works for me.

      • Backroadmeats
        Backroadmeats commented
        Editing a comment
        Celery seed and curing salt add the same thing. Nitrates.. only difference is you know the amount of nitrate in pink salt,. Celery seed not so much.

      #7
      I know nothing about the KBQ, but also in agreement with lostclusters that it seems yer after looks & I heard little about taste, munchiness vs. cosmetics. Tell us what it tastes like.

      Comment


        #8
        When ribs are overcooked they can get really white... is it possible the thicker parts are perfectly cooked and the thinner parts are over? If you have a lot of variability in the thickness from one end of the rack to the other, it can make it difficult to achieve the right balance.

        Comment


        • WhiteSmokeExpert
          WhiteSmokeExpert commented
          Editing a comment
          I think they just get cooked too fast. I've gotten them pretty dry and still had the coloring I like.

        #9
        And, while this may be obvious, I'll put it out there: Place the thick ends of the ribs towards the back of the cook chamber where the baffles dump the hot gases. The thin ends towards the doors.

        Comment


        #10
        Welcome to The Pit.

        If your ribs are thicker on one end than the other, you could cut them where the thickness change starts and pull each when it's ready.

        Comment


        • bbqLuv
          bbqLuv commented
          Editing a comment
          Too EZ a solution.

        #11
        You’ve had the same problem with all your smokers, so maybe your expectations are too high? Also, there’s no mention of your KBQ poppet settings, and whether you check them frequently during your cooks. I don’t have a KBQ yet, but I’ve read many times that the poppets can move if they aren’t clipped into place.

        Comment


        • Chiller Phil
          Chiller Phil commented
          Editing a comment
          Securing of the Poppet Valves is not required, as they do not alter their position during a cook.
          I attest to that fact as an owner and frequent user.

        • Dr. Pepper
          Dr. Pepper commented
          Editing a comment
          Chiller Phil while it might not make a difference in his cooks, I can attest to often pushing the upper poppet outward when I’m putting wood in the fire chamber. I’ve made it a habit to check out the upper poppet position after I’ve added wood.

        #12
        Welcome to the Pit!

        Are you cooking those "extra meaty" babybacks? Folks have had problems cause one end is too thick.

        Comment


          #13
          the "thin parts" if i am thinking of the right spot likely get super dried out and won't hold a smoke ring.

          do they taste smokey but they just aren't pink? then i wouldn't worry about it

          Comment


            #14
            Squish your ribs fatter when you put them on the cooker. This plumps up the skinny end. Good advice above!

            Comment


              #15
              What temperature monitoring system are you using? If just the thermometer that came with the KBQ that goes in at the top you won't get a true reading of the cook chamber temp. I use a Maverick SR50 and place a probe on the cooking grate on either side of the ribs. Sometimes I put a probe in the thick end but I usually just use the bend test to tell when they are done.

              Comment


              • WhiteSmokeExpert
                WhiteSmokeExpert commented
                Editing a comment
                Yeah, I got the probe that came with the cooker. But I had a couple of inkbird probes in there, I noticed that it's a lotter hotter than the probe at the top, I already had my dial set at 180 as it is, but it read 235ish on the top probe and 250ish on my inkbird probe.

              • 58limited
                58limited commented
                Editing a comment
                One other thing: for shorter cooks like ribs, I'll open the top poppet valve between half way and all the way. Most of my ribs have the smoke ring going all the way through the thin end and most of the way through the thick end.

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