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Briskett

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  • Spinaker
    commented on 's reply
    Yeah hear ya man, I think you get all that oil and char on the rim and in the groove of the lid and I think it acts like a gasket to seal that baby up tight. Mine doesn't leak at all because of it. I've never had it stick quite as bad as you did though, it sounds like.

  • JPP
    commented on 's reply
    I have to clean my lid groove and barrel rim... On my last cook, I had to hold the barrel handle whilst pulling up on the lid handle to get it off... Leaked smoke some, but the lid felt like it was vapor locked in place!

  • Spinaker
    commented on 's reply
    So true. I always press my lid down with both hands around the rim, in several different places just to make sure that the lid doesn't leak.

  • Jerod Broussard
    replied
    It is amazing how little of a lid leak will shoot the temp up. All them coals, just beggin' for a little more air flow

    I've had more than one instance where I didn't put the lid back on securely, then find myself staring at my Maverick, wondering why my BBQ probe keeps climbing above my already PSSDT (Pre-Set Settle Down Temp).

    Leave a comment:


  • Spinaker
    replied
    Keep the lid sealed like the others have said. I think this is the most important factor. Also, check to make sure that your bottom damper is fitting tightly to your PBC. If there is a gap between the barrel and the damper pedal it causes excess air to enter the chamber. This was the case with mine, because it didn't match the hole properly, and caused there to be a small gap. I had to shim it with paper to get it to stay at the desired level. (I got tired of sticking my Leatherman in the PBC to tighten the damn thing)

    Another thing to check is how much lit coals you put in the basket. I typically use 3/4 of a chimney of Kingsford Hickory to dump into a 2/3 full PBC basket. Then I put the lid on the PBC right away, so the fire doesn't rage and get to hot. I know the directions say to let it roll for 20 mins with no lid. I found that my PBC gets to hot doing that. So this is how I do it. Plus as you know, its easy to get the temp up in the PBC. When I do it this way, mine generally spikes at about 400 or just north there of but, then drops really quickly to 300 then settles at 250-265 almost like clock work with in 1/2 hr or so.

    I'm not saying my methods are right or wrong, but this is just how I do it and it works great for me. The PBC is close to set and forget, but nothing is truly set and forget in my very humble opinion. There are always tweeks to be made.

    I hope this helps alleviate some of the problems you are having. Keep your PBC head up, the best Que I've made has been cranked outta my PBC!

    Good Luck Brewmaster!

    -John

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerod Broussard
    commented on 's reply
    I don't inject. I dry brine for 24-48 hours.

  • HC in SC
    replied
    Using Kingsford blue, even with the fire basket packed to the gills, my PBC stays right at 265-285 with meat on and lid closed for hours. I'd agree that if you are running wires in between the lid and barrel that is your problem. When the lid is closed securely you should only see smoke from the rebar holes.

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  • _John_
    replied
    The leads under the lid are probably your issue, running through the rebar holes should fix ya. The thing is pretty well tuned, the other day I cracked the lid just a tiny bit and it went to 450. It is not unusual to see flames erupt if you leave the lid open when saucing the ribs.
    I inject my briskets if i'm not going to wrap, wrapping seems to handle the moisture to my liking.

    Run the probes through the rebar holes and let us know how it goes.

    Leave a comment:


  • smarkley
    replied
    Kingsford Mesquite briquettes burn hotter... that is what most people think. If you use them, you definitely need to take steps to close gaps.

    Try comparing it with Kingsford Blue... you might find they work better.

    Leave a comment:


  • alanlipps
    replied
    I am using a chimney, and following the PBC instructions. I used an 8lb bag of Kingsford Mesquite briquettes, took out enough to fill the chimney half way, lit the chimney using newspaper, waited until all the coals were lit (top ones still showed some black), dumped the lit coals into the basket of unlit coals, put the ribs on, and closed the lid. The outside temp was about 32 F. with 100% humidity (mist) so I thought it would take a long time. I came back 1.5 hours later and the ribs were at 210F and the cooker temp was approximately 325-330F and cranking out a lot of smoke. I did have my thermometer leads exiting the cooker between the lid and cooker--so I am guessing the lid was not sealed though there was only a very small gap.

    Anyway, thanks for the feedback. Next time, I will try passing the leads though the rebar holes and using some foil to close the gaps--if the temp gets too hot.

    Is it necessary to inject the brisket with broth/liquid?

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  • smarkley
    replied
    I would have to agree with Jerod on plugging things up and checking the lid. He has cooked more brisket on the PBC than you or I could eat in a year.

    Nice 3 tier mashing setup by the way! Reminds me of my home brewing days.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerod Broussard
    replied
    I would check the lid for leakage. What light up method did you use, lighter fluid, chimney?

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  • alanlipps
    replied
    I recently acquired a PBC after reading many reviews. So far, I have overcooked (destroyed) two expensive briskets. I very recently purchased a new digital thermometer (after killing the briskets) that monitors both meat and cooker temps. I did some ribs this weekend that were at 210 in just 1.5 hours--a little crispy but good flavor. I could not get the cooker below 325; the temperature shot up to near 500 (with flames) when I removed the lid to sauce the ribs. I am considering trying to find something to use as a water pan (maybe a dutch oven?). Any suggestions? (yes I followed the PBC instructions for lighting the fire, used Kingsford briquettes, and set the air intake to 1/2 open as I am at about 2000 ft. above sea level). Any help cooking brisket on a PBC, or reducing the cooking temperature, is appreciated.

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  • Brewmaster
    replied
    I spread the coals around the basket, will try putting them in the middle and blocking the rebar holes next time, thanks for the help

    Leave a comment:


  • _John_
    replied
    Mine can do that if I spread the coals all over the entire basket, so I usually take 40 from 1 spot in a full basket and then put them right back in that spot. Sometimes this requires me to crack the lid a couple times, but I usually get 275 for 10 hours.

    Leave a comment:

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